Space Startup Earns $1B In U.S. Military Contracts Amid Launch Drone Unveiling

Aevum CEO Jay Skylus with the Ravn X. Aevum Space startup Aevum received several government contracts worth nearly $1 billion, including opportunities with the United States Space Force and United States Air Force (USAF). Aevum is constructing autonomous drones called Ravn X, which take off and land horizontally like airplanes; […]

Space startup Aevum received several government contracts worth nearly $1 billion, including opportunities with the United States Space Force and United States Air Force (USAF).

Aevum is constructing autonomous drones called Ravn X, which take off and land horizontally like airplanes; today (Thursday, Dec. 3) also marks the rollout of the Ravn X vehicle. Aevum is also building a global logistics network to take on as many launch duties as possible themselves.

This work recently garnered them the upcoming ASLON-45 mission with the United States Space Force, which is the first formal small launch mission contracted by the U.S. Department of Defense.

Aevum also received a USAF AFWERX Small Business Innovation Research Phase I contract for rapid launch and space logistics, along with a separate indefinite delivery and quantity contract with the USAF Space and Missile Systems Center’s Launch Enterprise Small Launch and Targets Division. The latter contract gives Aevum the chance to compete for 20 missions over a nine-year period.

“We’ve been effectively putting our launch vehicle design and our services to the test underneath contracts under the past year,” said Jay Skylus, CEO of Aevum, in an interview, adding, “They’ve really put us through the wringer, and that’s good. It puts our services to test and technology to test.”

Watch the live unveiling at 12 p.m. EST (1700 GMT) Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020

With these two reference customers in hand, he said, the company is discussing moving into the commercial market with technology already certified by some of the top launch providers in the United States. Simultaneously, Aevum has been able to expand its facilities in a so-far undisclosed U.S. city, along with adding capacity through strategic partnerships, even amid the global pandemic.

“We have been adding more personnel to the team, not necessarily by hiring more people, but by creating more partnerships and contracts for our people,” he said. “Aevum has a technology and logistics focus, and so whenever we are operating our autonomous platforms, we will be looking for operators rather than engineers.”

In 2020, the company made most of its money through revenues and was able to move mostly away from the traditional angel and venture capital funding needed for technology-heavy startups, Skylus said. “As far as the business landscape, we’re quite fortunate that our particular segment [revenues] haven’t been impacted [by COVID],” he said, although the company is implementing remote working and physical distancing like other space companies around the world.

“I’m excited to see the bold innovation and responsiveness in development today by our small launch industry partners to support emerging warfighter needs,” stated Lt. Col. Ryan Rose, chief of the Space and Missile Systems Center’s small launch and targets division at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico.

“The U.S. Space Force is proactively partnering with industry to support U.S. space superiority objectives,” Rose added. “Having a robust U.S. industry providing responsive launch capability is key to ensuring the U.S. Space Force can respond to future threats.”

Source Article

Next Post

Supernova surprise creates elemental mystery -- ScienceDaily

Michigan State University (MSU) researchers have discovered that one of the most important reactions in the universe can get a huge and unexpected boost inside exploding stars known as supernovae. This finding also challenges ideas behind how some of the Earth’s heavy elements are made. In particular, it upends a […]

Subscribe US Now