Meet Ireland’s Latest Tech Startups Wednesday 2nd Dec at Demo Day!

Next week on Wednesday December 2nd it begins!

Well technically it begins at 4pm, but what exactly begins? Our Demo Day for the Startup Boost 2020 Ireland Pre Accelerator!

Over a 6 week volunteer lead program we have had the chance to work with speakers and mentors from including entrepreneurs, angel investors, VC’s, government and industry experts who all gave their time freely to help prepare our 8 startups for their next steps in building their companies, and we need your help.

After all of this amazing work it’s time to showcase all of this early stage tech talent at Demo Day. On the day we kick off at 4pm where you will get to watch for the first time at our hybrid live event pitches from this years Startup Boost Ireland cohort followed by a panel thoughtfully titled, “Show Me The Money!”

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This investment focussed panel features our Program

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SpaceX launches 2nd crew, regular station crew flights begin

Sunday’s launch follows by just a few months SpaceX’s two-pilot test flight. It kicks off what NASA hopes will be a long series of crew rotations between the U.S. and the space station, after years of delay. More people means more science research at the orbiting lab, according to officials.

“This is another historic moment,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said Friday. But he noted: “Make no mistake: Vigilance is always required on every flight.”

The flight to the space station — 27 1/2 hours door to door — should be entirely automated, although the crew can take control if needed.

With COVID-19 still surging, NASA continued the safety precautions put in place for SpaceX’s crew launch in May. The astronauts went into quarantine with their families in October. All launch personnel wore masks, and the number of guests at Kennedy was limited. Even the two astronauts on the first SpaceX

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Astronauts arrive at launch site for 2nd SpaceX crew flight

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Four astronauts arrived at Kennedy Space Center on Sunday for SpaceX’s second crew launch, coming up next weekend.

For NASA, it marks the long-awaited start of regular crew rotations at the International Space Station, with private companies providing the lifts. There will be double the number of astronauts as the test flight earlier this year, and their mission will last a full six months.

“Make no mistake: Every flight is a test flight when it comes to space travel. But it’s also true that we need to routinely be able to go to the International Space Station,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in welcoming the astronauts to Kennedy.


The crew of three Americans and one Japanese are scheduled to rocket away Saturday night, provided approaching Tropical Storm Eta doesn’t interfere. It will be a speedy trip to the space station, a six-orbit express lasting under

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Astronauts head to launch site for SpaceX’s 2nd crew flight

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Four astronauts headed to Kennedy Space Center on Sunday for SpaceX’s second crew launch, coming up next weekend.

For NASA, it marks the long-awaited start of regular crew rotations at the International Space Station, with private companies providing the lifts. There will be double the number of astronauts as the test flight earlier this year, and their mission will last a full six months.

The crew of three Americans and one Japanese are scheduled to rocket away Saturday night. It will be a speedy trip to the space station, a six-orbit express lasting under nine hours.

The astronauts have named their Dragon capsule Resilience given all the challenges of 2020: coronavirus and social isolation, civil unrest and a particularly difficult election and campaign season. They have been in quarantine for a week and taking safety precautions — masks and social distancing — long before that.

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November 2nd, 2020 | Vol. 196, No. 16 | U.S.

Vote Time Magazine Cover
Illustration by Shepard Fairey for TIME

I don’t often use this space to direct your attention to other publications, but I do recommend you check out an article Science published online on Sept. 24. Titled Singing in a Silent Spring, it adds a new entrant to the list of uplifting changes in the natural world that occurred when we humans went into temporary retreat at the start of the pandemic. It appears that in the relative hush of the San Francisco Bay Area this past April and May, the song of the white-crowned sparrow became quieter and sweeter than it had been before.

This has been a year of so much pain, hardship, chaos and loss. And yet as nations around the world begin to rebuild from the pandemic, it is clear that we also have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to change our tune. Our issue this week, in partnership

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