Why spending a long time on your phone isn’t bad for mental health — ScienceDaily

General smartphone usage is a poor predictor of anxiety, depression or stress say researchers, who advise caution when it comes to digital detoxes.

The study published in Technology, Mind, and Behavior was led by Heather Shaw and Kristoffer Geyer from Lancaster University with Dr David Ellis and Dr Brittany Davidson from the University of Bath and Dr Fenja Ziegler and Alice Smith from the University of Lincoln.

They measured the time spent on smartphones by 199 iPhone users and 46 Android users for one week. Participants were also asked about their mental and physical health, completing clinical scales that measure anxiety and depression symptoms. They also completed a scale which measured how problematic they perceived their smartphone usage to be.

Surprisingly, the amount of time spent on the smartphone was not related to poor mental health.

Lead author Heather Shaw of Lancaster University’s Department of Psychology said: “A person’s daily

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Is This Trend a Bad Omen for Office REITs?

Office building owners have been under pressure this year due to the impact the COVID-19 outbreak has had on the sector. Many companies easily adapted to working remotely thanks to the rapid adoption of communication tools like Zoom (NASDAQ: ZM) and Slack (NYSE: WORK). That drove concerns that many workers might not return to the office even after the pandemic has ended. Those worries caused the average office real estate investment trust’s (REIT’s) stock to tumble more than 35% this year, according to Nareit.

While most office REITs firmly believe that their tenants will return to the office as they had in the past once the outbreak is over, the current wave of new cases is causing more office workers to stay home, according to recent data. That’s delaying the return to normal that these landlords had hoped to see.

Opting to stay home

According to Kastle Systems, the recent

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Carson Block’s ‘Insane Alpha’ Disappears in Bad Year for Shorts

Carson Block is having an unusually tough time betting against Chinese stocks.

The famed short seller’s recent calls to unload shares of GSX Techedu Inc., TAL Education Group and Joyy Inc. have largely backfired after the stocks rallied following brief dips when his reports were first posted.

“GSX, after we reported it, tripled,” Block said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. “There is clearly something wrong.”

Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, isn’t questioning his methods. He blames options traders, small floats and investors taking advantage of low volumes to push the Chinese stocks back up after his calls.

The result has been a grim year of shorting China equities for Block, who earned his reputation following successful bets against companies like Noble Group Ltd., the commodities firm in Singapore, and Sino-Forest Corp., a Canada-based timber company that operated in China.

GSX, the online education firm that Muddy Waters called

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Opinion | So, Did ‘Bad Things Happen’ With the Election in Philadelphia?

Joe Biden’s lead in the presidential election results in Pennsylvania has now surpassed 81,000 votes, far exceeding Donald Trump’s 44,000-vote victory margin there four years ago. Yet the Trump campaign continues to claim in court huge but incalculable levels of fraud, particularly in Philadelphia.

As with cases filed elsewhere around the country, Mr. Trump will not succeed. Even a cursory examination of the data refutes any notion of substantial voting fraud.

As a threshold matter, it is important to understand how eerily similar the 2020 results in Philadelphia were to 2016. As of Tuesday evening, 743,966 votes for president had been counted in Philadelphia — an increase of 34,348 votes from 2016. This 4.8 percent increase in turnout is less than half of the 11.6 percent increase in turnout seen in the state as a whole.

Not only was the increase in the number of ballots cast in Philadelphia from

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Americans Got Tired of Looking Bad on Zoom

In the mid-2000s, news anchors found themselves with a problem: They didn’t look so hot anymore. Their real-life visages hadn’t changed, but the technology that beamed them into millions of households had outpaced their faces’ ability to keep up. High-definition cameras proliferated, as did the enormous HDTVs that render blemishes, pancake makeup, and flyaways in larger-than-life detail. Local newscasters with limited budgets fretted over judgment from viewers. CNN’s Anderson Cooper considered plastic surgery. Makeup and lighting crews scrambled to adjust.



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© Asia Pietrzyk


When the pandemic hit, the same thing happened to millions of Americans. This was hardly our worst problem in March, but it was a problem nonetheless. While people had been living their in-person life, blissfully unaware of their expression at any given moment, the cameras around them had been multiplying and improving. Once office work and socializing went online, everyone looked terrible. Americans had spent the past

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The sale of the duelling dinosaurs fossil may be bad news for science

An artist's model of the Montana Dueling Dinosaurs based on geographical placement of the fossils.
An artist’s model of the Dueling Dinosaurs

CK Preparations. Courtesy of Bonhams

The Duelling Dinosaurs are just the sort of remains that fossil fans dream about. Encased in huge lumps of tan sandstone are the dark bones of two dinosaurs that were buried together more than 66 million years ago.

One of the fossils is a familiar three-horned Triceratops. The other is a young Tyrannosaurus, a probable cousin of T. rex, a rare representative of what the “tyrant king” was like during its gangly, awkward years. There’s no evidence that these two dinosaurs died in combat but they have still been the subject of palaeontological gossip for a decade.

Enough cash has now finally been stumped up to give the bones a home. Rather than a private bidder, a museum has paid – probably millions – for the fossilised duo. Although palaeontologists should be

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The sale of an amazing dinosaur fossil could be bad news for science

An artist's model of the Montana Dueling Dinosaurs based on geographical placement of the fossils.
An artist’s model of the Dueling Dinosaurs

CK Preparations. Courtesy of Bonhams

The Duelling Dinosaurs are just the sort of remains that fossil fans dream about. Encased in huge lumps of tan sandstone are the dark bones of two dinosaurs that were buried together more than 66 million years ago.

One of the fossils is a familiar three-horned Triceratops. The other is a young Tyrannosaurus, a probable cousin of T. rex, a rare representative of what the “tyrant king” was like during its gangly, awkward years. There’s no evidence that these two dinosaurs died in combat but they have still been the subject of palaeontological gossip for a decade.

Enough cash has now finally been stumped up to give the bones a home. Rather than a private bidder, a museum has paid – probably millions – for the fossilised duo. Although palaeontologists should be

Read More

SpaceX’s Starlink still provides rapid internet speeds in bad weather

  • Users of SpaceX’s Starlink satellite-internet service said how impressed they were with download speeds in snow and high-speed winds on the Reddit Starlink community.
  • One user reported speeds reaching 175 Mbps in the colder air, which is 20 Mbps faster than usual.
  • The Starlink terminal even withstood a user’s 175 mph leafblower.
  • The terminal – or “UFO on a stick” – heats up enough to melt the snow on top of it. But some users said internet speeds drop as the snow initially builds up.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

SpaceX’s Starlink satellite-internet service gives users rapid speeds reaching 175 Mbps even in high-speed winds, deep snow, and freezing temperatures.

Users of SpaceX’s “Better Than Nothing Beta” test have posted pictures and videos on the Reddit Starlink community proving that the Starlink terminal still works in extreme weather conditions – and in some cases, it’s even faster.

The

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Green Deal: Good for a climate-neutral Europe – bad for the planet: Import of millions of tons of cereal and meat every year undermines EU agricultural standards – damage to the environment is outsourced –

Europe is to become the first climate-neutral continent by 2050 — this goal of the “Green Deal” was announced by the EU in late 2019. Carbon emissions shall be reduced, while forestation, agriculture, environmentally friendly transport, recycling, and renewable energies shall be pushed. In Nature, scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) now show that this “Green Deal” might be a bad deal for the planet, as the EU will outsource environmental damage by high imports of agricultural products. The researchers recommend actions for the deal to push global sustainability.

The “Green Deal” adopted by the European Commission is to change European agriculture significantly in the next years and to contribute to making Europe the first climate-neutral continent. By 2030, about a quarter of all agricultural areas shall be farmed organically. Use of fertilizers and pesticides shall be reduced by 20 and 50 percent, respectively. In addition, the EU

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My Gaming PC Has Become The Bad Screen During The Pandemic

I’ve had access to Undertale on Steam for some time now, and have probably started three or four new saves of the game during the pandemic. Each time I start it up, I barely scrape the edge of the first checkpoint before quitting. But last week, I realized the game was also available on the Nintendo Switch at a price that I could squeeze into my budget. I bought the game and booted it up, thinking that I had spent $15 in worse ways if my fifth attempt at the game ended just as quickly as the last four. Two days later, I had beaten the game and become an Undertale fanatic.

The game isn’t just good: it’s great. It completely blew away my expectations, managing to keep me invested emotionally while also getting a real laugh or two out of me. It was such a positive experience, that

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