In Monterey Bay, California, scientists grab the chance to study white sharks up close

Growing over six meters (20 feet) long and armed with hundreds of serrated, razor-sharp teeth, white sharks are the world’s largest predatory fish.



a fish swimming under water


© Stanford University


In late summer and fall, up to 250 white sharks congregate in Monterey Bay, off the central Californian coast, to feast on marine mammals — including elephant seals and sea lions — that gather here to breed.

From a shark’s perspective, “think of Monterey Bay as having one of the best fast food restaurants on the planet,” says shark expert and Stanford professor, Barbara Block.

Video: In Monterey Bay, scientists are tagging and tracking white sharks (CNN)

In Monterey Bay, scientists are tagging and tracking white sharks

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Block also travels to Monterey Bay because the annual marine mammal “buffet” offers her an ideal opportunity to study the sharks up close. She and her team lure the “curious” sharks alongside

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Unemployment claims drop, but Bay Area tech firms prep layoffs

SAN JOSE — Unemployment claims in California fell to their lowest levels since coronavirus-linked business shutdowns began in March — but a few Silicon Valley tech companies and at least one big services firm that caters to the tech sector have prepped new layoffs.

In November alone, Hitachi Vantara, Boston Scientific, Marvell Semiconductor and PayPal have revealed plans for job cuts in Silicon Valley, according to official state filings.

Despite the improvement in unemployment claims in California, the tech industry layoffs and weekly jobless filings that remain far higher than what is typical are disquieting reminders that the economy in the state and the Bay Area remains feeble.

“The California economy is in a suspended state,” said Michael Bernick, a former director of the state Employment Development Department and an employment attorney with law firm Duane Morris. “There is little new hiring and no economic uptick over the past two

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Researchers successfully track ‘bottle tags’ through Ganges River system into Bay of Bengal — ScienceDaily

A new study demonstrates the potential for plastic bottles tagged with tracking devices to deepen our understanding of how plastic pollution moves through rivers. Emily Duncan of the University of Exeter, U.K., and colleagues present this research in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on Dec 2, 2020.

Plastic pollution threatens natural ecosystems and human health worldwide. Previous research suggests that rivers transport up to 80 percent of the plastic pollution found in oceans. However, while ocean modeling and tracking technology have revealed detailed insights into how plastic litter moves and accumulates within oceans, river transport of plastic pollution remains poorly understood.

To help address this knowledge gap, Duncan and colleagues developed a new, low-cost, open-source tracking method that uses reclaimed 500 mL plastic bottles to house custom-designed electronics, allowing the bottles to be tracked via GPS cellular networks and satellite technology. These “bottle tags” mimic plastic beverage bottles, in the

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Bay Area tech worker awarded $10M after being shot by deputy in Tahoe

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A Northern California county has paid nearly $10 million to settle a lawsuit by a Silicon Valley software engineer who was having a mental health crisis two years ago when a deputy shot him, paralyzing him from the waist down.

Placer County paid Samuel Kolb, 50, and his family $9.9 million to settle the lawsuit the family filed after a deputy shot him twice on Jan. 14, 2018, inside a North Lake Tahoe rental cabin where Kolb and his teenage son were vacationing, Kolb said.

“There’s a measure of relief in not having to go through this and not having to put my family through any more legal challenges. But I would trade all the money plus interest to have my old life back, to not have gone through this and put my family through this, to have full use of my body. No amount of

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GGBA Member Spotlight: Karla Campbell of 4 Directions Consulting & Coaching – San Francisco Bay Times

Karla Campbell, Founder of 4 Directions Consulting and Coaching LLC, helps leaders create a new definition of leadership for themselves and their organizations. That definition accounts for the emerging challenges that arise from a workforce containing new technology, low employee engagement, and multiple generations working together. Leaders become lost because current leadership models do not account for these complicated times—made all the more challenging due to the pandemic. Here, Campbell shares more about her work and offers valuable advice to those thinking of starting a business of their own.

GGBA: What inspired you to create your business?

Karla Campbell: I created 4 Directions Consulting and Coaching to provide the tools, support, and guidance existing and emerging leaders need to demonstrate their best every day while facing an ever-changing workforce landscape.

I believe that one, “the answers are always in the room,” and two, “the magic is in the mess.” The

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Bay Area Council, Stanford win as Trump admin rules nixed

The Bay Area Council, Stanford University and a host of other business and educational groups scored a legal victory over the administration of President Donald Trump on Tuesday, with a federal judge tossing out new rules for the H-1B visa.

“This is a major win for our economy and for our ability to recover from the worst downturn in generations,” Bay Area Council CEO Jim Wunderman said in a statement. “H-1B workers fill an important need in our economy and provide immense benefits not only to the companies they work for but the communities where they live. Many of the leading and fastest-growing technology companies in the Bay Area have been founded by entrepreneurs from other countries who first came here on visas.”

The rules issued in October by the federal departments of Labor and Homeland Security had imposed a one-year limit on placement of H-1B workers at third-party firms,

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Can Bay Area startup’s firefighting drones save us from catastrophe?

With flame-ravaged Bay Area communities still mired in a tough recovery after California’s worst fire season destroyed more than 1,000 Bay Area homes, a Silicon Valley startup says its artificially intelligent firefighting drones could help stop future catastrophes.

If drones from Rain Industries had been in position around the Bay Area during this August’s lightning storms, the aircraft could have contained 72% of the fires within 10 minutes of ignition, the Palo Alto firm’s co-founder and CEO Maxwell Brodie said. “This is a transformative technology,” Brodie said. “If it is us or someone else that does this, it doesn’t really matter. This will happen.”

After starting out with a smaller, six-rotor prototype drone that successfully doused small fires by dropping balls full of retardant, Rain is now testing autonomous aircraft resembling small helicopters that it says can fly preemptively during potentially hazardous wildfire conditions and use their infrared sensors to

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Bay Area families furious as Good Eggs fails to deliver Thanksgiving meals

A system failure left some Bay Area customers of the San Francisco grocery delivery startup Good Eggs incensed that no one told them their Thanksgiving deliveries weren’t coming.

In a long Twitter thread, Good Eggs CEO Bentley Hall explained that early Wednesday morning, the company “experienced a multi-hour warehouse system outage.”

“On Tuesday, we fell behind on picking orders. This resulted in delivery delays early in the day, and a driver shortage later. To address this, we pushed some deliveries to early Wednesday morning,” Hall explained in a statement. “Early Wednesday morning, on our biggest batch of the year, we experienced a warehouse system outage for several hours. This created a cascading set of more material challenges during the day. We were unable to recover fully from them.

“I made some poor decisions earlier in the day that led to a lack of timely, clear communication. We left many

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Bay Area’s DoorDash to pay $2.5 million after allegedly tip theft

Bay Area restaurant-delivery firm DoorDash has agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle a government lawsuit alleging it stole drivers’ tips and deceived customers into thinking their tip money was going to drivers.

Washington, D.C. attorney general Karl Racine filed the civil suit last year, and in a news release accused the San Francisco company of “lowering labor costs by swiping tips left for workers.”

Racine claimed “DoorDash led consumers to believe that any tips would go directly to food delivery workers, while instead effectively treating this money as extra profit for the company.”

The suit in District of Columbia Superior Court alleged DoorDash would reduce drivers’ pay for each job by the amount of any tip. For example, if a customer left no tip on a job that was to pay $10 to the driver — called a “Dasher” by the company — DoorDash would pay the driver $10,

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New technology at Green Bay Austin Straubel airport makes it easier for TSA to detect explosives



a desk with a computer: Two state-of-the-art advanced 3D scanners are in use by TSA agents at Austin Straubel International Airport.


© Courtesy of the Transportation Security Administration
Two state-of-the-art advanced 3D scanners are in use by TSA agents at Austin Straubel International Airport.

ASHWAUBENON – Those still traveling for the holidays this year may notice some new 3D scanners at Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport’s security checkpoints. 

Transportation Security Administration officers are using two state-of-the-art advanced technology computed tomography scanners to inspect passengers’ carry-on luggage, according to a news release from the TSA.

The scanners use sophisticated algorithms to detect explosives by creating 3D images that TSA officers can manipulate on a screen to get a better view of what is inside bags. The scanners create such a clear image of a bag’s contents that the system can automatically detect explosives, including liquids, according to TSA. 



a person sitting on a bench: A passenger approaches the TSA security desk Friday at Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport.


© Ebony Cox/USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin
A passenger approaches the TSA security desk Friday at Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport.

“This new technology

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