New questions: What did David Perdue know about COVID technology before big stock buyback?

Earlier this year, embattled Sen. David Perdue of Georgia, one of two multimillionaire Republicans facing tight runoff elections that could decide control of the Senate, sold $1 million worth of stock in Cardlytics, a financial firm where he once sat on the board. What makes this stock sale especially interesting is that six weeks later, an executive shake-up at Cardlytics that sent the stock tumbling. After the share price hit its low point in March, Perdue bought back up to $500,000 worth of stock, which has since quadrupled in value.

The trades drew federal scrutiny, but Perdue argued that he did not personally direct any of his transactions. The New York Times reported last week, however, that Department of Justice investigators have found that Perdue had instructed his Goldman Sachs wealth manager to make the sale two days after receiving a personal email from the Cardlytics CEO that advised of

Read More

Trump Threatens to Veto Military Funding Bill Over ‘Big Tech’ and Their ‘Very Dangerous & Unfair Section 230’



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by Mediaite


Photo by Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

President Donald Trump threatened to veto the military’s spending bill on Tuesday night due to a completely unrelated topic: his hatred of the legal protections afforded to social media platforms.

“Section 230, which is a liability shielding gift from the U.S. to “Big Tech” (the only companies in America that have it – corporate welfare!), is a serious threat to our National Security & Election Integrity.” Trump tweeted. “Our Country can never be safe & secure if we allow it to stand. Therefore, if the very dangerous & unfair Section 230 is not completely terminated as part of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), I will be forced to unequivocally VETO the Bill when sent to the very beautiful Resolute desk. Take back America NOW. Thank you!”

Read More

Salesforce’s $27.7B Slack deal combines two Amazon allies, creates big new rival for Microsoft

Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff calls it a “match made in heaven.” (GeekWire Illustration / Photo by Kevin Lisota)

Salesforce confirmed its plan to acquire Slack and revealed the purchase price, $27.7 billion in cash and stock, perhaps not coincidentally topping Microsoft’s $26.2 billion LinkedIn acquisition in the rankings of the largest tech deals of all time.

If the deal works out as Marc Benioff and Stewart Butterfield hope, it won’t be the last time the two San Francisco companies best the Redmond tech giant.

Salesforce and Slack “will shape the future of enterprise software,” said Benioff, the Salesforce CEO, in a statement announcing the deal.

“The opportunity we see together is massive,” added Butterfield, the Slack CEO.

Read More

Apple might need Samsung for a big iPhone camera upgrade



iPhone 13 Rumors


© Provided by BGR
iPhone 13 Rumors

  • New reports say Apple is working on a big iPhone camera upgrade that might depend on key technology from Samsung, its biggest rival and business partner.
  • Apple is reportedly shopping for periscope cameras that would significantly increase the zoom capabilities of the iPhone.
  • It’s unclear whether the iPhone 13 will deliver this tech, with an insider having previously said that Apple is eying 2022 for the camera zoom upgrade.

The newest iPhone is one of the best cameras you can buy this year, although it’s not the only great camera experience that fits in your pocket. The Pixel 5, Galaxy S20/Note 20, and the latest Huawei flagships (if you can find them) also offer high-end photography features. We’ve seen plenty of camera reviews for each phone that highlight the strengths and weaknesses of their multi-lens camera systems, and it’s ultimately a matter of

Read More

What did David Perdue know about COVID technology before big stock buyback?



David Perdue wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by Salon
David Perdue

U.S. Sen. David Purdue (R-GA) speaks to the crowd of supporters during a “Defend the Majority” rally at the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agriculture Center on November 19, 2020 in Perry, Georgia. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Loading...

Load Error

Earlier this year, embattled Sen. David Perdue of Georgia, one of two multimillionaire Republicans facing tight runoff elections that could decide control of the Senate, sold $1 million worth of stock in Cardlytics, a financial firm where he once sat on the board. What makes this stock sale especially interesting is that six weeks later, an executive shake-up at Cardlytics that sent the stock tumbling. After the share price hit its low point in March, Perdue bought back up to $500,000 worth of stock, which has since quadrupled in value.

The trades drew federal scrutiny, but Perdue argued that he did not personally direct any of his

Read More

How to set up HomeKit security camera activity zones in macOS Big Sur

With macOS Big Sur, you can make your HomeKit Secure Video camera notify you of movement only in selected portions of its field of view.

As convenient and reassuring as security cameras are, it’s also hard to position them in exactly the right place. You need them to cover certain areas, but you don’t want them covering others.

So for instance, maybe the security camera on the back of your house can see your neighbor’s garden, and they are forever having barbecues there. Or perhaps the one on the front of your house has to be tilted to see the end of your drive, but then can’t help but include where the school bus stops.

Now with macOS Big Sur, HomeKit cameras can have the option to set what are called activity zones. The cameras will still show their entire field of view, and if they are recording then

Read More

Big Tech’s stock market reign may finally be about to end

Who says investing is hard?



a person standing in front of a store: In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, trader Ashley Lara uses her handheld device as she works on the trading floor, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020. U.S. stocks rose broadly in morning trading Tuesday, sending the S&P 500 toward another record high, as investors focus on the possibility that coronavirus vaccines could soon help usher in a fuller global economic recovery. (Colin Ziemer/New York Stock Exchange via AP)


© Colin Ziemer/New York Stock Exchange/AP
In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, trader Ashley Lara uses her handheld device as she works on the trading floor, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020. U.S. stocks rose broadly in morning trading Tuesday, sending the S&P 500 toward another record high, as investors focus on the possibility that coronavirus vaccines could soon help usher in a fuller global economic recovery. (Colin Ziemer/New York Stock Exchange via AP)

All you needed to do for the past few years to enjoy solid gains in the stock market was buy an S&P 500 or Nasdaq 100 index fund. That provided exposure to market darlings like the FAANG quintet of Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google owner Alphabet as well as Microsoft.

Loading...

Load Error

The Big Tech stocks have boomed thanks to strong gains in revenue, market share and earnings

Read More

Zoom reports big 3Q gains, but slowing growth sinks stock

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Zoom’s videoconferencing service remains a fixture in pandemic life, but its breakneck growth is showing signs of tapering off as investors debate whether the company will be able to build upon its recent success after a vaccine enables people to intermingle again.

For now, Zoom is thriving as tens of millions of people who never heard of the service at the beginning of the year rely on its video meeting tools to connect with their co-workers, teachers, friends and family while efforts to fight contain the pandemic prevent them from going into offices, schools and most many other places. That dependence boosted Zoom’s fortunes, producing a pandemic-driven success story that was highlighted again Monday with the release of the company’s quarterly results for the August-October period.

Zoom’s revenue more than quadrupled from the same time last year to $777 million, yielding a profit of $198

Read More

Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed — ScienceDaily

The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes.

In research published in the open-access journal BMC Medical Ethics, Elizabeth Evans, associate professor in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences, sought to identify concerns and develop recommendations for the ethical handling of opioid use disorder (OUD) information stored in the Public Health Data Warehouse (PHD).

“Efforts informed by big data are saving lives, yielding significant benefits,” the paper states. “Uses of big data may also undermine public trust in government and cause other unintended harms.”

Maintained by the Massachusetts Department of Health, the PHD was established in 2015 as an unprecedented public health monitoring and research tool to link state government data sets and provide timely information to

Read More

Obama criticizes Americans for liking ‘cheap gas and big cars’ more than ‘the environment’

Former President Barack Obama, in his latest memoir, criticized Americans for liking “cheap gas and big cars” more than they care about “the environment” – even during a catastrophic event like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

The comments came during a section in Obama’s 700-page book, “A Promised Land,” released earlier this month.

On page 570, the former commander in chief recounts a press conference he gave more than a month into the oil spill – now considered one of the largest in history – saying his comments did not adequately express the frustration he truly felt.

FILE: Former President Barack Obama speaking at the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance Summit in Oakland, Calif.  (AP)

“Reading the transcript now, a decade later, I’m struck by how calm and cogent I sound,” Obama writes in his book. “Maybe

Read More