Global Blood Lipids Detector Market 2020 Business Growth, Technology and Production Analysis, Opportunities and Regional Market Scope by 2026

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Nov 29, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
Global Blood Lipids Detector Market 2020 by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2026 offers end to end industry from the definition, product specifications, and demand till forecast prospects. The report studies the industry coverage, current market status, and market outlook and forecast by 2026. This is an all-inclusive document that comprises crucial information about top players, market trends, pricing analysis, and an overview of the market. The report states industry developmental factors, historical performance from 2015-2026. The segmental market view by types of products, applications, end-users, and top vendors is given. Then it covers market size estimation, share, growth rate, global position, and regional analysis of the market. The report also covers forecast estimations for investments in the global Blood Lipids Detector industry from 2020 to 2026.

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COVID SCIENCE-Type O blood linked to lower risk, taking Vitamin D unlikely to help

Nov 27 (Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Certain blood groups less likely to get COVID-19

A large study adds to evidence that people with type O or Rh−negative blood may be at slightly lower risk from the new coronavirus. Among 225,556 Canadians who were tested for the virus, the risk for a COVID-19 diagnosis was 12% lower and the risk for severe COVID-19 or death was 13% lower in people with blood group O versus those with A, AB, or B, researchers reported on Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine. People in any blood group who were Rh-negative were also somewhat protected, especially if they had O-negative blood. People in these blood type groups may have developed antibodies that can recognize some

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GRAIL and UK Government to Make Galleri Multi-Cancer Early Detection Blood Test Available to Patients

MENLO PARK, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov 26, 2020–

GRAIL, Inc., a healthcare company whose mission is to detect cancer early, when it can be cured, today announced a partnership with the United Kingdom’s (UK) National Health Service (NHS) to help transform cancer outcomes by making GRAIL’s multi-cancer early detection blood test, Galleri™, available to UK patients starting in 2021.

The commercial partnership program aims to confirm Galleri’s clinical and economic performance in the NHS system as a precursor to its routine use by the NHS.

The partnership program will involve approximately 165,000 people in the UK and includes two groups. The first will include 140,000 people over the age of 50 without any suspicion of cancer, and the second will include 25,000 people aged 40 and above with suspicious signs or symptoms of cancer. Based on data from this program, access to the test could be expanded to around one million people

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High blood pressure in midlife is linked to increased brain damage in later life — ScienceDaily

Higher than normal blood pressure is linked to more extensive brain damage in the elderly, according to a new study published today (Thursday) in the European Heart Journal.

In particular, the study found that there was a strong association between diastolic blood pressure (the blood pressure between heart beats) before the age of 50 and brain damage in later life, even if the diastolic blood pressure was within what is normally considered to be a healthy range.

The findings come from a study of 37,041 participants enrolled in UK Biobank, a large group of people recruited from the general population aged between 40 and 69 years, and for whom medical information, including MRI brain scans was available.

The research, carried out by Dr Karolina Wartolowska, a clinical research fellow at the Centre for Prevention of Stroke and Dementia, University of Oxford, UK, looked for damage in the brain called

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Genetic study shows that the risk of pre-eclampsia is related to blood pressure and BMI — ScienceDaily

Pre-eclampsia, usually diagnosed by increased blood pressure and protein in urine, affects up to 5% of pregnant women. It contributes worldwide to the death of estimated 50 000 women and up to one million babies annually. The condition is also associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases among mothers and their children later in life. There is an inherited risk, with women with a family history of pre-eclampsia at greater risk of developing the condition themselves.

In the InterPregGen study, researchers from the UK, Iceland, Finland, Norway, Denmark, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan studied how maternal genetic variation influences the risk of pre-eclampsia. The team studied the genetic make-up of 9,515 pre-eclamptic women and 157,719 control individuals.

The results, reported today in Nature Communications, pinpointed DNA variants in the ZNF831 and FTO genes as risk factors for pre-eclampsia. These genes have previously been associated with blood pressure, and the FTO

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Researchers connect blood clots to an increased risk of death from COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

While respiratory issues continue to be the most common symptom of a COVID-19 infection, new research indicates the disease could also be associated with hypercoagulability, or increased tendency of the blood to clot. In a new study published November 20, 2020 in the journal EClinical Medicine by The Lancet, researchers from UC San Diego Health found that blood clots led to an increased risk of death by 74 percent.

Led by Mahmoud Malas, MD, division chief of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery at UC San Diego Health, researchers reviewed 42 different studies involving more than 8,000 patients diagnosed with COVID-19. Using random models, the team produced summary rates and odds ratios of mortality in COVID-19 patients with thromboembolism, blood clots — and compared them to patients without these conditions to determine what effect blood clots may have on risk of death.

“We began to notice a really unusual manifestation of

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Smelling blood, Huawei’s Chinese mobile rivals look to capitalise on its U.S. woes

SHENZHEN, China (Reuters) – Chinese handset rivals of Huawei Technologies including Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo are making aggressive moves to seize market share from their giant rival, after stepped-up U.S. sanctions hobbled Huawei’s supply chains, industry insiders say.

FILE PHOTO: The Huawei logo is seen at Huawei Connect in Shanghai, China, Sept. 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song

Last week Huawei said it has sold its budget Honor subrand for an undisclosed figure in a bid to safeguard the latter’s supply chain from U.S. action, which has made it difficult to source essential components.

All the same, Huawei’s Chinese rivals smell blood in the mid-to high-end phone market. In August a Huawei executive said the company will not be able to produce its flagship processors that power its high-end smartphones.

“What we can see now, whether from Xiaomi, Oppo or Vivo, is that they’re raising their forecasts for next year,” said Derek

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Biofriendly protocells pump up blood vessels — ScienceDaily

An international team comprising researchers from the University of Bristol, and Hunan and Central South Universities in China, have prepared biocompatible protocells that generate nitric oxide gas — a known reagent for blood vessel dilation — that when placed inside blood vessels expand the biological tissue.

In a new study published today in Nature Chemistry, Professor Stephen Mann and Dr Mei Li from Bristol’s School of Chemistry, together with Associate Professor Jianbo Liu and colleagues at Hunan University and Central South University in China, prepared synthetic protocells coated in red blood cell fragments for use as nitric oxide generating bio-bots within blood vessels.

Coating the protocells led to increased levels of biocompatibility and longer blood circulation times. Critically, the team trapped an enzyme inside the protocells which, in the presence of glucose, produced hydrogen peroxide. This was then used by haemoglobin in the protocell membrane to degrade the drug

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Biomedical engineers use computer modeling to investigate low blood oxygen in COVID-19 patients — ScienceDaily

Scientists are still solving the many puzzling aspects of how the novel coronavirus attacks the lungs and other parts of the body. One of the biggest and most life-threatening mysteries is how the virus causes “silent hypoxia,” a condition when oxygen levels in the body are abnormally low, which can irreparably damage vital organs if gone undetected for too long. Now, thanks to computer models and comparisons with real patient data, Boston University biomedical engineers and collaborators from the University of Vermont have begun to crack the mystery.

Despite experiencing dangerously low levels of oxygen, many people infected with severe cases of COVID-19 sometimes show no symptoms of shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. Hypoxia’s ability to quietly inflict damage is why it’s been coined “silent.” In coronavirus patients, it’s thought that the infection first damages the lungs, rendering parts of them incapable of functioning properly. Those tissues lose oxygen

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Social isolation during COVID-19 pandemic linked with high blood pressure — ScienceDaily

Lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increase in high blood pressure among patients admitted to emergency. That’s the finding of a study presented at the 46th Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC).

SAC 2020 is a virtual meeting during 19 to 21 November. Faculty from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) will participate in joint scientific sessions with the Argentine Society of Cardiology as part of the ESC Global Activities programme.

“Admission to the emergency department during the mandatory social isolation period was linked with a 37% increase in the odds of having high blood pressure — even after taking into account age, gender, month, day and time of consultation, and whether or not the patient arrived by ambulance,” said study author Dr. Matías Fosco of Favaloro Foundation University Hospital, Buenos Aires.

Mandatory social isolation due to COVID-19 was implemented on 20 March in Argentina as a

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