New telescope in works at Green Bank to detect, map Fast Radio Bursts | News

A new radio-telescope linked to similar telescopes at two sites in Canada will be built at the Green Bank Observatory, following the National Science Foundation’s award of a $1.7 million grant to a WVU professor studying Fast Radio Bursts.

The horizontal, 60-meter long, 20-meter wide telescope features a cylindrical profile similar to a snowboarding half-pipe. According to iNFOnews.ca, it will operate in concert with similar “Outrigger” telescopes planned for construction at the Algonquin Radio Observatory in Ontario and at a site near Allenby, British Columbia.

The three Outrigger scopes will in turn connect with the similar, but much larger, CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) radio-telescope in operation since 2017 at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory near Kaleden, British Columbia. The Outrigger telescopes will triangulate the positions of targeted objects, allowing the CHIME telescope to pinpoint their locations.

The grant to build the new telescope at Green Bank was awarded

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Bursts of radio waves in space may be from cores of dead stars

This is an Inside Science story.



The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) telescope is used by researchers to observe a radio burst believed to be from a massive dead star with a powerful magnetic field.


© Andre Renard/CHIME Collaboration via Inside Science
The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) telescope is used by researchers to observe a radio burst believed to be from a massive dead star with a powerful magnetic field.

Astronomers have spotted a handful of extremely intense and brief blasts of radio waves since 2007 but have yet to pin down exactly what’s creating them. The blasts have fueled all sorts of speculation about their origins, from exploding or colliding stars to alien civilizations.

Now the speculation soon may be resolved, with three teams of scientists finally finding a clear and plausible source for the puzzling pulses, known as “fast radio bursts,” or FRBs. Using different telescopes, teams in the United States, Canada and China independently studied an FRB from April that originated 30,000 light-years away and lasted just a millisecond, and all three came to

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Astronomers discover clues that unveil the mystery of fast radio bursts — ScienceDaily

Fast radio bursts, or FRBs — powerful, millisecond-duration radio waves coming from deep space outside the Milky Way Galaxy — have been among the most mysterious astronomical phenomena ever observed. Since FRBs were first discovered in 2007, astronomers from around the world have used radio telescopes to trace the bursts and look for clues on where they come from and how they’re produced.

UNLV astrophysicist Bing Zhang and international collaborators recently observed some of these mysterious sources, which led to a series of breakthrough discoveries reported in the journal Nature that may finally shed light into the physical mechanism of FRBs.

The first paper, for which Zhang is a corresponding author and leading theorist, was published in the Oct. 28 issue of Nature.

“There are two main questions regarding the origin of FRBs,” said Zhang, whose team made the observation using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in Guizhou,

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The first star in our galaxy caught sending out fast radio bursts is doing it again

A little dead star that dazzled us earlier this year is not done with its shenanigans.



background pattern: A magnetar is a superdense neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field. In this illustration, the magnetar is emitting a burst of radiation.


© Provided by Live Science
A magnetar is a superdense neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field. In this illustration, the magnetar is emitting a burst of radiation.

Magnetar SGR 1935+2154, which in April emitted the first known fast radio burst from inside the Milky Way, has flared up once more, giving astronomers yet another chance to solve more than one major cosmic mystery.

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On 8 October 2020, the CHIME/FRB collaboration detected SGR 1935+2154 emitting three millisecond radio bursts in three seconds. Following up on the CHIME/FRB detection, the FAST radio telescope found something else – a pulsed radio emission consistent with the magnetar’s spin period.

“It’s really exciting to see SGR 1935+2154 back again, and I’m optimistic that as we study these bursts more carefully, it will help us better

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