Physicists capture the sound of a perfect fluid — ScienceDaily

For some, the sound of a “perfect flow” might be the gentle lapping of a forest brook or perhaps the tinkling of water poured from a pitcher. For physicists, a perfect flow is more specific, referring to a fluid that flows with the smallest amount of friction, or viscosity, allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Such perfectly fluid behavior is rare in nature, but it is thought to occur in the cores of neutron stars and in the soupy plasma of the early universe.

Now MIT physicists have created a perfect fluid in the laboratory, and listened to how sound waves travel through it. The recording is a product of a glissando of sound waves that the team sent through a carefully controlled gas of elementary particles known as fermions. The pitches that can be heard are the particular frequencies at which the gas resonates like a plucked string.

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Physicists capture the sound of a ‘perfect’ fluid

Physicists capture the sound of a "perfect" fluid
MIT physicists have created a perfect fluid in the laboratory, and recorded the sound of that “perfect flow.” The way that sound travels through this fluid can be used to calculate the sound, and “quantum friction,” in neutron stars and other perfect fluids. Credit: Christine Daniloff, MIT

For some, the sound of a “perfect flow” might be the gentle lapping of a forest brook or perhaps the tinkling of water poured from a pitcher. For physicists, a perfect flow is more specific, referring to a fluid that flows with the smallest amount of friction, or viscosity, allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Such perfectly fluid behavior is rare in nature, but it is thought to occur in the cores of neutron stars and in the soupy plasma of the early universe.


Now MIT physicists have created a perfect fluid in the laboratory, and listened to how sound waves travel

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Golar and Black & Veatch Announce Collaboration in Floating Ammonia Production, Carbon Capture, Green LNG and other emerging technologies

Golar LNG Limited (“Golar” or “the Company”) announces today that it has agreed with Black & Veatch Corporation (“B&V”) to expand on their long-standing FLNG relationship and enter into a collaboration agreement in the field of floating ammonia production, carbon capture, green LNG and hydrogen. Golar brings to the relationship its deep experience of delivering and operating paradigm shifting low cost floating LNG infrastructure that works, and B&V, as a leading provider of LNG technology also bring a deep expertise in green technologies. Within 2020, Golar and B&V intend to jointly publish a thought leadership paper on our first area of interest for collaboration, floating ammonia production with carbon capture and storage (“Floating Blue Ammonia”). In subsequent months, Golar and B&V intend to continue to jointly publish our thoughts as we focus in on the technical and commercial viability of the most prospective floating applications of the green and blue

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New technology allows cameras to capture colors invisible to the human eye

New research from Tel Aviv University will allow cameras to recognize colors that the human eye and even ordinary cameras are unable to perceive.

The technology makes it possible to image gases and substances such as hydrogen, carbon and sodium, each of which has a unique color in the infrared spectrum, as well as biological compounds that are found in nature but are “invisible” to the naked eye or ordinary cameras. It has groundbreaking applications in a variety of fields from computer gaming and photography as well as the disciplines of security, medicine and astronomy.

The research was conducted by Dr. Michael Mrejen, Yoni Erlich, Dr. Assaf Levanon and Prof. Haim Suchowski of TAU’s Department of Physics of Condensed Material. The results of the study were published in the October 2020 issue of Laser & Photonics Reviews.

“The human eye picks up photons at wavelengths between 400 nanometers and

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New Industrial Machine Vision Cameras From Canon Utilize Next-Gen 19 Micron Sensor Technology For Color Low-Light Image Capture

MELVILLE, N.Y., Nov. 4, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today introduced the Company’s next generation of multi-purpose cameras, the ML-100, and the ML-105i, which deliver amazingly high sensitivity to capture Full HD Color video with a minimum subject illumination of less than 0.0005 lux (at maximum 75 dB gain setting, equivalent to an ISO sensitivity of over 4,500,000). With the ability to capture color low-light images, these multi-purpose cameras can be utilized in industrial system design, where seeing color images is critical during day and night.

Canon’s new series of multi-purpose industrial machine vision cameras employ a next-generation 19um, 35mm full-frame CMOS sensor. The modular design of the cameras allows implementation and integration into industrial machine vision environments.

The ML series is available in two models with two different lens mounts and two video output configurations to choose from,

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Baker Hughes Signs Agreement to Acquire Compact Carbon Capture Technology to Advance Industrial Decarbonization

Baker Hughes (NYSE: BKR) announced today it is acquiring Compact Carbon Capture (3C), a pioneering technology development company specializing in carbon capture solutions. The acquisition underpins Baker Hughes’ strategic commitment to lead in the energy transition by providing decarbonization solutions for carbon-intensive industries, including oil and gas and broader industrial operations.

The advancement of carbon capture technology solutions is widely considered critical to delivering the additional CO2 emissions reduction needed to meet global 2050 climate targets. In the energy and industrial sectors, carbon capture technology is among the most viable decarbonization paths for both retrofitting existing assets as well as for greenfield projects. 3C’s technology can address CO2 capture from different emission sources and can contribute significantly to the decarbonization of customers’ operations.

3C’s technology differs from traditional carbon capture solvent-based solutions by using rotating beds instead of static columns, effectively distributing solvents in a compact and modularized

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Premium Models Will Capture 80 Percent of All Smartphone Revenues in Western Europe in 2021

According to the latest research from Strategy Analytics, premium smartphone models will capture a record 80 percent marketshare of all smartphone revenues generated in Western Europe in 2021. Soaring 5G adoption and a new wave of affordable-premium handsets, such as Apple iPhone SE, will drive the premium smartphone category to an all-time high next year.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201026005153/en/

Figure 1: Western Europe Smartphone Revenue Forecast by Wholesale Price-Tier: % of Total (Graphic: Business Wire)

Boris Metodiev, Associate Director, at Strategy Analytics, said, “We estimate premium smartphone models accounted for 73 percent of all smartphone wholesale revenues generated in Western Europe during 2019, rising to a forecast 77 percent in 2020, and a record 80 percent in 2021. Premium models completely dominate the smartphone revenue landscape across Western Europe.”

Linda Sui, Director at Strategy Analytics, added, “The premium smartphone market in Western Europe

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Scientists capture world’s first 3,200-megapixel photos

Scientists at the Menlo Park, California-based SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have taken the world’s first 3,200-megapixel digital photos, using an advanced imaging device that’s built to explore the universe.

“We will measure and catalog something like 20 billion galaxies.” said Steven Kahn, director of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory in Chile. That observatory is where the world’s largest digital camera will become the centerpiece of a monumental effort to map the night sky. The camera will spend 10 years capturing the most detailed images of the universe ever taken.  



a screen shot of a tiled wall: A head of romanesco broccoli captured at 3,200 megapixels. SLAC


© Provided by CNET
A head of romanesco broccoli captured at 3,200 megapixels. SLAC

“Most parts of the night sky have actually never been imaged at all by telescopes.” Kahn said. “No part of the sky has really been imaged with this kind of time, sequencing and time cadence, where you can watch how things change.”

The team working on the

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Wearable motion capture tech uses a single fisheye camera

Typically, motion capture systems are confined to one studio containing multiple cameras, and they require subjects to wear sensor-equipped body suits. A new setup, however, is based around a single chest-mounted camera.

Known as MonoEye, the experimental system was designed by a Tokyo Institute of Technology team led by Prof. Hideki Koike, working with colleagues from Carnegie Mellon University.

It incorporates a camera fitted with an ultra-wide-angle lens, that is worn on the subject’s chest. With its 280-degree field of view, that camera is able to image not only the environment in front of the subject, but also that person’s arms, legs and face.

The video is analyzed via three specially designed deep neural networks, which respectively estimate the subject’s three-dimensional body pose, their head pose, and the camera’s orientation within its surroundings. That data is used to build an animated wire-frame computer model of the subject, which replicates their

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If Your Business Is Not Working In Real Time, You’re Out Of Time To Capture The Business Moment

Domenic Ravita is MemSQL Field CTO, applying new technology to strategic initiatives. He previously worked at TIBCO, Accenture, and S1 Corp.

Business is about serving the needs of customers. But customer expectations are changing quickly, and most organizations are not truly aware of how fast that’s happening.

Most businesses are moving in slow motion relative to their customers. That means they miss out on opportunities to make decisions about and act on the moments that matter.

In the past, lag time was accepted. Nielsen called people on the phone to understand their TV viewing habits. Broadcast TV networks set advertising rates and advertisers gauged viewership based on Nielsen ratings. It took a long time for a legion of people to collect this data, and once they got the data, it was typically a small and outdated sample size. But this was the best available method given the technology of

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