Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield’s life and career rise, in photos

  • Stewart Butterfield founded Slack in 2013 after selling his first startup, Flickr, to Yahoo for more than $20 million.
  • Slack became one of the fastest-growing companies ever, achieving a $1 billion valuation less than a year after it officially launched.
  • Butterfield, whose birth name was Dharma before he changed it at age 12, was born in British Columbia and majored in philosophy in college. 
  • He’s currently engaged to a fellow tech founder: Jennifer Rubio, the cofounder of luggage startup Away.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Stewart Butterfield is on a roll.

In the early 2000s, Butterfield created Flickr, which sold to Yahoo for over $20 million. Now, his latest venture, Slack, one of the fastest-growing business apps ever, has been acquired by Salesforce for $27.7 billion.

The workplace messaging app, born out of a now-defunct gaming startup Tiny Speck, will help Salesforce compete with its chief rival, Microsoft,

Read More

Watch: 12-year-old boy accepted to Georgia Tech, seeks NASA career

Nov. 24 (UPI) — A 12-year-old Georgia boy who has been accepted to attend Georgia Tech said he plans to study aerospace engineering for a career in space exploration.

Caleb Anderson, 12, who is dual-enrolled in high school and Chattahoochee Technical College, is aiming to start classes at Georgia Tech next fall, his family said.

“I think I am going to go to Mars, and do more school, I think, and try to get my master’s at Georgia Tech,” Anderson told WSB-TV.

“Then do an internship with Elon Musk, and then I’ll probably get my Ph.D. at MIT. And then I think I’ll start working at either NASA or SpaceX.”

The boy’s parents said they noticed their son was exceptionally intelligent at a very young age.

“At 3 weeks old, I did notice that Caleb was trying to mimic some of my words. … By 4 months, he was picking

Read More

Fulton County’s Mobile Career Center Comes To Roswell Tuesday

ROSWELL, GA — Fulton County residents looking for help to find successful employment will have a new and innovative way to access career support services when Fulton County’s Mobile Career Center bus rolls into Roswell, starting Tuesday.

The Mobile Career Center is a service of WorkSource Fulton, which serves more than 10,000 Fulton County residents each year, providing job training, career advisement, and job search support in an effort to connect job seekers with in-demand careers. WorkSource staff will be providing help with resumes and interview skills, as well as providing guidance to help residents in their job search at the following locations/on the following dates, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day.

Dates

Location

Tuesday, Nov. 17
Wednesday, Dec. 2

City Hall
38 Hill Street
Roswell, GA 30075

Thursday, Nov. 19
Wednesday, Dec. 9

East Roswell Park
9000 Fouts Road
Roswell, GA 30076

Tuesday, Dec. 15

Hembree Park

Read More

Side hustles as career recovery during COVID-19

In a matter of months, the makeup of America’s workforce has been completely overturned. Swift transitions to remote work have resulted in, according to Gallup, 7 in 10 employees working from home today. And even though unemployment in the U.S. fell to 8.4% in August 2020, the number of available jobs still remains far below pre-pandemic levels.

The global pandemic has redefined what it means to have job—and financial—stability. The coronavirus has challenged many businesses and working professionals, forcing them to act fast, mitigate loss, and respond to disruptions during an uncertain time. With people spending more time than ever at home, the side hustle has emerged as an opportunity for people to not only keep themselves occupied in the evenings after their eight-hour days and during their extra free time, but also as a way to take their job and financial security into their own hands.

As we continue

Read More

‘It’s still a work in progress’: Analysis shows racial inequity in who takes career, tech courses – News – The Herald News, Fall River, MA

Alphina Kamara wonders what might have happened if she’d been introduced to science and engineering careers at her high school in Wilmington, Delaware.

Kamara, who is Black, was enrolled in an “audio engineering” course that taught her how to make music tracks and videos instead of a regular engineering course that she recalls was mostly filled with white students.

When she asked an administrator at Mount Pleasant High School about this apparent disparity, she said she was told that the audio engineering course was created for “regular students.”

“They thought we would be more interested in audio engineering than engineering,” said Kamara, now a junior at Wesleyan University studying English and sociology. “That was a hard pill to swallow.”

Historically, career and technical education (CTE) was seen as a dumping ground for students who weren’t considered college material. A two-tier educational system tracked predominantly low-income students and students of color

Read More

Student Faced Racial Inequity When She Took Career Tech Courses

Alphina Kamara wonders what might have happened if she’d been introduced to science and engineering careers at her high school in Wilmington, Delaware.

 

Kamara, who is Black, was enrolled in an “audio engineering” course that taught her how to make music tracks and videos instead of a regular engineering course that she recalls was mostly filled with white students.

 

When she asked an administrator at Mount Pleasant High School about this apparent disparity, she said she was told that the audio engineering course was created for “regular students.” 

 

“They thought we would be more interested in audio engineering than engineering,” said Kamara, now a junior at Wesleyan University studying English and sociology. “That was a hard pill to swallow.”

 

Historically, career and technical education (CTE) was seen as a dumping ground for students who weren’t considered college material. A two-tier educational system tracked predominantly low-income students and students of color

Read More

Analysis: Racial inequity in who takes career, tech courses

title=

ADVANCE FOR RELEASE OCT. 22, 2020 AND THEREAFTER — Alphina Kamara at Wesleyan University, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Middletown, Conn. Kamara, a junior at Wesleyan University studying English and sociology, says she was never encouraged to explore options like an engineering course while in high school.

AP

Alphina Kamara wonders what might have happened if she’d been introduced to science and engineering careers at her high school in Wilmington, Delaware.

Kamara, who is Black, was enrolled in an “audio engineering” course that taught her how to make music tracks and videos instead of a regular engineering course that she recalls was mostly filled with white students.

When she asked an administrator at Mount Pleasant High School about this apparent disparity, she said she was told that the audio engineering course was created for “regular students.”

“They thought we would be more interested in audio engineering than engineering,”

Read More

Racial inequity in who takes career, tech courses

Alphina Kamara wonders what might have happened if she’d been introduced to science and engineering careers at her high school in Wilmington, Delaware.

Kamara, who is Black, was enrolled in an “audio engineering” course that taught her how to make music tracks and videos instead of a regular engineering course that she recalls was mostly filled with white students.

When she asked an administrator at Mount Pleasant High School about this apparent disparity, she said she was told that the audio engineering course was created for “regular students.”


“They thought we would be more interested in audio engineering than engineering,” said Kamara, now a junior at Wesleyan University studying English and sociology. “That was a hard pill to swallow.”

Historically, career and technical education (CTE) was seen as a dumping ground for students who weren’t considered college material. A two-tier educational system tracked predominantly low-income students and students of color

Read More

Diversity benefits career choices: AppDynamic’s GM follows a non-traditional path into tech

The skills gap in information technology has placed a focus on teaching science, technology, engineering, and math. But following the STEM straight-and-narrow isn’t the only path into a career in tech.

A diversity of life experiences can add up to create an employee with a wider viewpoint and skill set than someone who has stayed in the same field since high school.

Take Linda Tong (pictured), who was recently appointed general manager for AppDynamics LLC. Her journey started on the STEM path when she enrolled as a math major in the pre-med track at Yale. But a side step led to her unintentionally graduating with a bachelor’s degree in economics.

“I kept taking these math and econ classes,” she said. “And when I was at the end of my third year of college, I’d finished the economics major.”

This week, theCUBE spotlights Linda Tong in our Women in Tech feature.

Read More

Diversity benefits career choices: AppDynamics GM follows a nontraditional path into tech

The skills gap in information technology has placed a focus on teaching science, technology, engineering, and math. But following the STEM straight-and-narrow isn’t the only path into a career in tech.

A diversity of life experiences can add up to create an employee with a wider viewpoint and skill set than someone who has stayed in the same field since high school.

Take Linda Tong (pictured), who was recently appointed general manager for AppDynamics. Her journey started on the STEM path when she enrolled as a math major in the pre-med track at Yale. But a side step led to her unintentionally graduating with a bachelor’s degree in economics.

“I kept taking these math and econ classes,” she said. “And when I was at the end of my third year of college, I’d finished the economics major.”

This week, theCUBE spotlights Linda Tong in our Women in Tech feature.

Constant

Read More