VW’s Hitzinger says complexity of new cars will drive consolidation

FRANKFURT — The auto industry faces a new wave of consolidation as cars become electric, connected and add highly automated driving functions, Alexander Hitzinger, head of Volkswagen Group’s Project Artemis said on Wednesday.

“There will be consolidation. Not everybody will be able to afford these complex platforms. We will see emerging a smaller number of very large players who will drive this transformation,” Hitzinger told the Financial Times Future of the Car summit.

The need to connect autonomous driving sensors to electric motors, batteries and high-definition maps is forcing automakers to design vehicle underpinnings and car software operating systems in house rather than stitching together legacy code and systems provided by a myriad of suppliers.
Project Artemis is VW’s attempt to do just that.

“Cars are so complex that the traditional concept where you outsource to tier one manufacturers does not work anymore,” Hitzinger explained in a Webcast.

The investment

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The complexity of new cars will lead to consolidation, says VW’s Hitzinger

FRANKFURT — The auto industry faces a new wave of consolidation as cars become electric, connected and add highly automated driving functions, Alexander Hitzinger, head of Volkswagen’s Project Artemis, said on Wednesday.

“There will be consolidation. Not everybody will be able to afford these complex platforms. We will see emerging a smaller number of very large players who will drive this transformation,” Hitzinger told the FT’s Future of the Car summit.

The need to connect autonomous driving sensors to electric motors, batteries and high-definition maps is forcing carmakers to design vehicle underpinnings and car software operating systems in house rather than stitching together legacy code and systems provided by a myriad of suppliers.

Project Artemis is VW’s attempt to do just that.

“Cars are so complex that the traditional concept where you outsource to tier one manufacturers does not work anymore,” Hitzinger said in a webcast.

The investment sums and

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Volkswagen’s Hitzinger says complexity of new cars to drive consolidation

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The auto industry faces a new wave of consolidation as cars become electric, connected and add highly automated driving functions, Alexander Hitzinger, head of Volkswagen’s Project Artemis said on Wednesday.



a car parked in front of a building: FILE PHOTO: VW shows electric SUV "ID 4" during a photo workshop


© Reuters/MATTHIAS RIETSCHEL
FILE PHOTO: VW shows electric SUV “ID 4” during a photo workshop

“There will be consolidation. Not everybody will be able to afford these complex platforms. We will see emerging a smaller number of very large players who will drive this transformation,” Hitzinger told the FT’s Future of the Car summit.

The need to connect autonomous driving sensors to electric motors, batteries and high-definition maps is forcing carmakers to design vehicle underpinnings and car software operating systems in house rather than stitching together legacy code and systems provided by a myriad of suppliers.

Project Artemis is VW’s attempt to do just that.

“Cars are so complex that the traditional concept where you outsource to

Read More

VW’s Hitzinger says complexity of new cars to drive consolidation

FILE PHOTO: The new electric Volkswagen model ID. 4 is shown during a media presentation in Zwickau, Germany, September 18, 2020. Picture taken September 18. REUTERS/Matthias Rietschel/File Photo

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The auto industry faces a new wave of consolidation as cars become electric, connected and add highly automated driving functions, Alexander Hitzinger, head of Volkswagen’s Project Artemis said on Wednesday.

“There will be consolidation. Not everybody will be able to afford these complex platforms. We will see emerging a smaller number of very large players who will drive this transformation,” Hitzinger told the FT’s Future of the Car summit.

The need to connect autonomous driving sensors to electric motors, batteries and high-definition maps is forcing carmakers to design vehicle underpinnings and car software operating systems in house rather than stitching together legacy code and systems provided by a myriad of suppliers.

Project Artemis is VW’s attempt to do just

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Obama criticizes Americans for liking ‘cheap gas and big cars’ more than ‘the environment’

Former President Barack Obama, in his latest memoir, criticized Americans for liking “cheap gas and big cars” more than they care about “the environment” – even during a catastrophic event like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

The comments came during a section in Obama’s 700-page book, “A Promised Land,” released earlier this month.

On page 570, the former commander in chief recounts a press conference he gave more than a month into the oil spill – now considered one of the largest in history – saying his comments did not adequately express the frustration he truly felt.

FILE: Former President Barack Obama speaking at the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance Summit in Oakland, Calif.  (AP)

“Reading the transcript now, a decade later, I’m struck by how calm and cogent I sound,” Obama writes in his book. “Maybe

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Images of Hyundai’s Walking Cars

  • According to a Bloomberg report, Softbank is reportedly looking to sell Boston Dynamics to Hyundai for $1 billion.
  • If true, that could mean Spot, the famous robot dog, could be getting a new owner.
  • We’re speculating that this has something to do with the South Korean automaker’s wild walking car concept.

    For its next trick, Spot—the world’s favorite robot dog, known for perusing the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, narcing on social distancing rule-breakers, and even working on oil rigs—could be getting a major treat from Hyundai.

    Softbank is reportedly in talks with the South Korean auto manufacturer to sell off its robotics company, Boston Dynamics Inc, according to a Bloomberg report. Supposedly, the transaction could be worth up to $1 billion.

    🤖You like badass robots. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    Why is Hyundai so interested in the robot dog? We have a theory, and it has something

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    Self-driving cars: A level-by-level explainer of the road to autonomy

    Self-driving cars have started to wear out their welcome, and they aren’t even here yet. Much of the promise and disappointment around them centers on Level 4, one of six levels of technology that allow cars to operate without our input to some degree.

    I largely agree with former Alphabet Chairman Eric Schmidt’s view that “it’s a bug that cars were invented before computers.” In terms of sheer technical elegance, we never should have been at the controls in the first place. 

    Imagine we hadn’t yet invented automobiles. Suppose I Iaid out a vision for using 3,300 pound machines to typically transport just our 175-pound selves in a process requiring we pay rapt attention to the use of a steering wheel and pedals to navigate roads composed of asphalt, brightly colored suggestions and

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    Volvo is using gaming technology to work on safety of cars

    Volvo has come up with a new way to test the safety of its car and it seems rather entertaining for the engineers working on the project. The company has built “the ultimate driving simulator” which it claims is a “ground-breaking mixed-reality simulator”. The company clams this setup is used to make new developments in safety and autonomous driving technology.

    The setup includes a moving driving seat, a steering wheel with haptic feedback and a virtual reality headset. The driver also gets a full-body Teslasuit that provides haptic feedback from a virtual world, while also monitoring bodily reactions.

    The software uses real-time 3D development platform Unity. It also employs the assistance of Finnish virtual and mixed reality experts Varjo. The simulator involves driving a real car on real roads. It combines life-like, high definition 3D graphics.

    The combination of software and hardware allows Volvo Cars engineers to simulate traffic scenarios

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    Volvo is now Utilising Gaming Technology To Manufacture Safer Cars



    a close up of a sign: Volvo is now Utilising Gaming Technology To Manufacture Safer Cars


    © Provided by News18
    Volvo is now Utilising Gaming Technology To Manufacture Safer Cars

    Technological innovations have always been a part of the industry and just like every other industry, the automobile world is also rapidly advancing in contemporary times to make their cars more refined. Over the last century, car manufacturers have witnessed several technological advances to make their vehicles adapt to changing tastes and needs.

    In one such case, Volvo Cars – the premium carmaker – has taken the help of gaming technology to make new improvements in safety and autonomous driving technology. The Swedish auto giants are taking the concept a step ahead by employing the use of state-of -the-art simulators, which offer an immersive experience making it hard to distinguish the simulation from reality.

    Volvo has set-up features, including a high definition virtual reality headset which offers crystal clear views, a moving driving seat and a

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    Artificial intelligence could be used to hack connected cars, drones warn security experts

    Cyber criminals could exploit emerging technologies including artificial intelligence and machine learning to help conduct attacks against autonomous cars, drones and Internet of Things-connected vehicles, according to a report from the United Nations, Europol and cybersecurity company Trend Micro.

    While AI and machine learning can bring “enormous benefits” to society, the same technologies can also bring a range of threats that can enhance current forms of crime or even lead to the evolution of new malicious activity.

    “As AI applications start to make a major real-world impact, it’s becoming clear that this will be a fundamental technology for our future,” said Irakli Beridze, head of the Centre for AI and Robotics at the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute. “However, just as the benefits to society of AI are very real, so is the threat of malicious use,” he added.

    SEE: Cybersecurity: Let’s get tactical (ZDNet/TechRepublic special feature)

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