Norepinephrine release to cells is diminished, causing cascade of effects — ScienceDaily

In a new paper, researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) report brain chemistry that may contribute to why drinkers have difficulty paying attention while under the influence.

The work is funded by generous support from the Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation and by grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute of Mental Health. Findings were published Dec. 2 in Nature Communications.

“When we want to focus on something, or when we stand up from a chair and become active, a brain stem nucleus releases a chemical called norepinephrine. Acute exposure to alcohol inhibits this signal in the brain,” said senior author Martin Paukert, MD, assistant professor of cellular and integrative physiology at UT Health San Antonio. When attention is needed for a task, norepinephrine is secreted by a brain

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Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections — ScienceDaily

Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice.

The nano-sized drug delivery method developed at Washington State University successfully treated both the bacterial growth and inflammation in the mice’s lungs. The study, recently published in Communications Biology, shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19.

“If a doctor simply gives two drugs to a patient, they don’t go directly to the lungs. They circulate in the whole body, so potentially there’s a lot of toxicity,” said Zhenjia Wang, the study’s corresponding author and an associate professor in WSU’s College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “Instead, we can load the two types of drugs into these vesicles that specifically target the lung inflammation.”

Wang and his research team have developed a method to essentially peel the membrane from neutrophils, the most common type

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DeepMind Breakthrough Helps to Solve How Diseases Invade Cells

(Bloomberg) — Google’s artificial intelligence unit took a giant step to predict the structure of proteins, potentially decoding a problem that has been described as akin to mapping the genome.



a hand holding a cellphone: A Deepmind Health logo sits displayed on the screen of an Apple Inc. iPhone in this arranged photograph in London, U.K. on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. Three years ago, artificial intelligence company DeepMind Technologies Ltd. embarked on a landmark effort to transform health care in the U.K. Now plans by owner Alphabet Inc. to wrap the partnership into its Google search engine business are tripping alarm bells about privacy.


© Bloomberg
A Deepmind Health logo sits displayed on the screen of an Apple Inc. iPhone in this arranged photograph in London, U.K. on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. Three years ago, artificial intelligence company DeepMind Technologies Ltd. embarked on a landmark effort to transform health care in the U.K. Now plans by owner Alphabet Inc. to wrap the partnership into its Google search engine business are tripping alarm bells about privacy.

DeepMind Technologies Ltd.’s AlphaFold reached the threshold for “solving” the problem at the latest Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction competition. The event started in 1994 and is held every two years to accelerate research on the topic.

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Different folds in a protein determine how it will interact

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Material recreates children’s superior bone-healing ability in adults’ stem cells — ScienceDaily

Scientists have developed a new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster by enhancing adults’ stem cell regenerative ability.

The study, led by researchers from RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences and CHI at Temple Street, is published in the current edition of Biomaterials, the highest ranked journal in the field of biomaterials science.

The researchers had previously discovered a molecule called JNK3, which is a key driver of children’s stem cells being more sensitive to their environment and regenerating better than adults’. This explains, at least partially, why children’s bones are able to heal more quickly. Building on this knowledge, they created a biomaterial that mimics the structure of bone tissue and incorporates nanoparticles that activate JNK3.

When tested in a pre-clinical model, the biomaterial quickly repaired large bone defects and reduced inflammation after a month of use. The biomaterial also proved to be safer and as effective

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Turning off a newly identified enzyme could reverse a natural aging process in cells — ScienceDaily

Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells.

Simulations that model molecular interactions have identified an enzyme that could be targeted to reverse a natural aging process called cellular senescence. The findings were validated with laboratory experiments on skin cells and skin equivalent tissues, and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

“Our research opens the door for a new generation that perceives aging as a reversible biological phenomenon,” says Professor Kwang-Hyun Cho of the Department of Bio and Brain engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), who led the research with colleagues from KAIST and Amorepacific Corporation in Korea.

Cells respond to a variety of factors, such as oxidative stress, DNA damage, and shortening of

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Amorepacific Develops an Original Technology That Reverses the Aging of Skin Cells in Joint Research with KAIST

Press release content from PR Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

SEOUL, South Korea, Nov. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Amorepacific R&D Center, together with KAIST, developed an original technology that reverses the aging process in human dermal fibroblasts. The system’s biology research was conducted in collaboration with a research team led by Professor Cho Kwang-hyun of the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering at KAIST. The result of the research was published in the online edition of an internationally renowned scientific journal, PNAS, on November 23. (The research article is titled “Inhibition of 3-phosphoinositide–dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) can revert cellular senescence in human dermal fibroblasts”.)

As skin cells get older, their ability to divide becomes significantly weakened, slowing down the speed of regeneration and the overall functionality of skin tissue. They also lose the ability to produce collagen and elastic

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DIO additives contribute to efficiency of polymer solar cells

DIO Additives Contribute to Efficiency of Polymer Solar Cells
A schematic of ultrafast interfacial excitons dynamics in the P51:PC71BM blend after photoexcitation. Credit: SIOM

Recently, researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have made progress in ultrafast dynamics of polymer solar cells (PSCs) with Soochow University.

The research team used femtosecond transient absorption technology to study active layer of organic solar cells, explaining the contribution of 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) additives to the efficiency enhancement of PSCs. The results have been published in Nanomaterials.

As a new type of solar cell device, PSCs have the advantages of light weight, mechanical flexibility and low-cost fabrication. But low efficiency is the main limit of its large-scale application.

The research team studied the effect of DIO additives on photocarrier generation in donor materials (P51) and bulk heterojunction films (P51:PC71BM) by pump-probe measurement.

They found that the introduction of DIO additives could improve the

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3 reasons why batteries will power our future trucks, not hydrogen fuel cells

A prominent decarbonization researcher believes battery electric trucks will become the norm for low emissions road freight, as alternatives, like fuel cell vehicles, are more expensive to run.

In an interview with Clean Energy Wire, Auke Hoekstra, an academic researcher from Eindhoven University of Technology, says that fuel cell vehicles “won’t ever be able to compete with electric trucks‘ business case.”

Below are three of the key arguments he makes for why battery electric trucks will become the norm, leaving fuel cell vehicles as a distant concept of a bygone moment.

Battery technology is nearly ready

As he alludes, around 80% of trucks, in the Netherlands at least, travel 750 km (470 miles) per day, at the very most. If you want to haul goods further than this, it starts to get expensive quickly as you’ll need to employ more drivers, and pay overtime.

In reality, most trucks only need

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Researchers uncover the unique way stem cells protect their chromosome ends — ScienceDaily

Telomeres are specialised structures at the end of chromosomes which protect our DNA and ensure healthy division of cells. According to a new study from researchers at the Francis Crick Institute published in Nature, the mechanisms of telomere protection are surprisingly unique in stem cells.

For the last 20 years, researchers have been working to understand how telomeres protect chromosome ends from being incorrectly repaired and joined together because this has important implications for our understanding of cancer and aging.

In healthy cells, this protection is very efficient, but as we age our telomeres get progressively shorter, eventually becoming so short that they lose some of these protective functions. In healthy cells, this contributes to the progressive decline in our health and fitness as we age. Conversely, telomere shortening poses a protective barrier to tumour development, which cancer cells must solve in order to divide indefinitely.

In somatic cells, which

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MESOPHDIO breaking down the bottleneck of cancer cells recognition by artificial intelligence technology

MESOPHDIO breaking down the bottleneck of cancer cells recognition by artificial intelligence technology

The changing landscape of digital medical imaging solutions is enabled by artificial intelligence (AI) technology. And the new challenges in the fast changing development of Bioinformatics, or called BioICT, are becoming one of the key driving forces to lead the way of future smart healthcare solutions. MESOPHDIO Laboratory is a new startup company targeting AI services for professors, doctors and Bio-tech companies to provide AI-powered applications or solutions.

Dealing with high resolution medical images is one of the major out-sourcing services provided by MESOPHDIO Lab. This service requires customized skills to do AI-based image processing. Once customers prepared data sets for AI model training, the rest of works will be handled by MESOPHDIO including digitized data gathering, tagging data and AI model training. It will bring great convenience to customers.

The founder of MESOPHDIO Lab. is Dr.

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