Minneapolis schools face challenging financial future, projections show

Minneapolis Public Schools is again facing a troubling, yet familiar, prediction about the district’s finances: The budget will remain burdened by falling enrollment and revenue that can’t keep pace with operating costs.

The rollout of the controversial district redesign, combined with concerns over distance learning during the pandemic, have exacerbated the decline in enrollment — a pattern that five-year projections show will continue over the next few years. Assuming the plan is fully implemented, enrollment may start ticking back up by the 2025-2026 school year, district officials said.

“Our analysis finds that, regardless of whether the [redesign] succeeds, the district is burdened by an unsustainable fiscal structure,” read the report, which will be presented to the school board Tuesday.

The board will also consider the certification of the 2021 property tax levy at its Tuesday meeting. The recommended levy of $224 million, down about 3.8% from 2020, is the maximum

Read More

New Orleans schools struggle to keep kids in class as the pandemic drags on, challenging families | Coronavirus

Lio Schaefer had long struggled with school attendance. Because he was bored and frequently felt ignored in class, he said he often skipped junior year classes at New Orleans Charter Science and Mathematics High School.

By the time the coronavirus pandemic hit last spring, Schaefer was in a group home for youths with behavioral problems. When he returned to live with his mother he could have re-enrolled in Sci-High. But worries of contracting the virus, coupled with an online learning platform he had no interest in turned that decision from a maybe to a no.

Coronavirus cases have tripled in New Orleans public schools in a week, prompting district leaders to urge students and staff to limit gatheri…

“Going back to high school just seemed like a bad idea,” the 17-year-old said.

Schaefer’s story is a cautionary tale. Despite massive efforts to ramp up virtual instruction and make learning possible

Read More

VCs say big tech often helps startups, challenging House lawmakers

  • When House lawmakers released a 449-report earlier this month calling for new antitrust legislation against big tech companies, it lambasted Google, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook for contributing to an innovation “kill zone” that it said hurts startups. 
  • But a growing number of VCs and industry leaders are challenging such claims, calling them misleading.
  • VCs say that practices like acquisitions, which the report wants to make more difficult for large tech companies to do, actually benefits startups. 
  • They also point to data showing that the rise in venture capital funding in recent years has accompanied the rise of big tech.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Buried in the sprawling, 449-page Congressional report spearheaded by House Democrats about regulating big tech is a recommendation that is making the venture capital world very nervous. 

To make it harder for big tech companies to snuff out young, upstart competitors by buying them,

Read More