Young scientist s named TIME’s first-ever Kid of the Year for technology that leads social change

TIME Magazine has announced its first-ever Kid of the Year – 15-year-old scientist and inventor Gitanjali Rao. 

Roa’s love for science began at the age of 10 when she discovered carbon nanotube sensor technology, which uses molecules to detect chemicals in water, and her passion grew from there.

Prior to being named Kid of the Year, Roa was listed on the Forbes 30 Under 30 List for developing a mobile device in 2017 to test for lead in drinking water – an innovation she made to address the Flint, Michigan water crisis.

Her most recent project is an app called Kindly that uses artificial intelligence to detect cyberbullying online at an early stage.

Roa was selected from a group of more than 5,000 nominees, but judges were astonished by her use of technology to combat a number of social issues ranging from contaminated water to opioid addiction and cyberbullying.

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Climate change: Why it could be time to cut back on new gadgets and HD streams

We need to cut global emissions, and fast – and in doing so, tech businesses are both part of the the problem – and the solution. A new report from the UK’s Royal Society finds that as technologies keep growing at pace, the onus is on the digital sector not only to reduce its own carbon footprint, but also to come up with innovative ways to reverse climate change globally. 

While there is no exact figure that sums up the impact of digital technologies on the environment, the report estimates that the sector currently represents between 1.4% and 5.9% of global greenhouse gas emissions. At the same time, the industry is projected to make huge strides in the coming years: for example, the total number of internet users is expected to reach 5.3 billion by 2023, up from less than four billion in 2018. 

All this extra connectivity comes at

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Bill Gates calls for creation of National Institutes of Energy Innovation to better address climate change

Wind power in Washington state. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)

In the midst of one global disaster, Bill Gates is thinking about how to prevent the next. And while the world clearly wasn’t prepared to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the Microsoft co-founder thinks there is one solution that could help address climate change.

In a new GatesNotes blog post on Thursday, the Microsoft co-founder is calling for a better national way to evaluate and nurture great ideas around clean energy research. Specifically, Gates would like to see the federal government create the National Institutes of Energy Innovation.

“This the most important thing the U.S. can do to lead the world in innovations that will solve climate change,” Gates said.

Rather than having research and ideas spread across departments such as Energy, Transportation, Defense and even NASA, Gates said the idea would follow the successful model demonstrated by the National

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This new Google Maps feature may completely change how you use the app



a room filled with furniture and a large window: Google Maps


© Provided by BGR
Google Maps

  • Google Maps has launched a new Facebook-style news feed within the app, incorporating recommendations and suggestions from Maps users.
  • The feed builds on other tools Google has added to Maps this year that help people learn more about the places they want to go to, which they can then use Google Maps to help them actually navigate to.
  • 2020 is the 15th anniversary of Google Maps.

One of the things I’ve been fascinated to watch over the past year or more, in a way that certainly pre-dates the coronavirus pandemic, is the extent to which Google has woken up to all the latent potential inside one of its least-sexy apps, but one which is almost as utilitarian and relied upon as the company’s signature search app. I’m talking, of course, about Google Maps, which celebrated its 15th anniversary earlier this year by rolling out

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In an unusual move, Trump administration will protect a pine tree due to climate change

with Alexandra Ellerbeck

In an unexpected decision, the Trump administration announced that a lethal fungus, a rapacious beetle and even a changing climate jeopardize the survival of an iconic tree of the American West.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is set to propose Wednesday listing the whitebark pine as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. 

Granting federal protections to the tree is a “watershed decision,” said Diana Tomback, professor of integrative biology at the University of Colorado at Denver who has studied the tree for decades.

The whitebark pine’s habitat spans over 80 million acres across seven states and Canada. In its official filing, the agency acknowledged that rising temperatures are pushing the high-elevation tree’s habitat up to higher altitudes, hurting the chances of survival for a pine whose nutritious seeds provide sustenance for everything from red squirrels to black bears.



a man standing next to a tree: A dead whitebark pine tree in the mountains east of Jackson Hole, Wyo. (Mead Gruver/AP)


© Mead Gruver/AP
A dead whitebark pine

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Climate change warms groundwater in Bavaria — ScienceDaily

Groundwater reservoirs in Bavaria have warmed considerably over the past few decades. A new study by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) compares temperatures at 35 measuring stations, taken at different depths, with data from the 1990s. Water found at a depth of 20 metres was almost one degree warmer on average than 30 years ago. The findings were published in the journal “Frontiers in Earth Science.”

As the air warms, the ground also becomes warmer over time — ultimately resulting in warmer groundwater. Geologists call this thermal coupling. “Unlike the atmosphere, however, the earth’s sub-surface is very sluggish,” explains Professor Peter Bayer, a geoscientist at MLU and co-author of the study. Because the ground below the surface does not react to short-term temperature fluctuations and thus tends to reflect long-term trends, it is a good indicator of climate change.

“This ground warming effect has been known

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China’s Chang’e 5 lands on moon, gets readies to dig in the lunar dirt

China’s Chang’e 5 mission has touched down on the surface of the moon, the country’s media reports. Next, the lander will drill to collect volcanic moon rock samples and scoop up some lunar dirt for return to Earth later this month.



a store inside of a building: The Long March rocket carrying Chang'e 5, prepared for launch. CNSA


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The Long March rocket carrying Chang’e 5, prepared for launch. CNSA

China’s space agency launched the Chang’e 5 mission atop of one of its Long March 5 rockets on Nov. 23. The lunar-sample return marks the first such mission by any country in decades.

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The landing came just before 7:15 a.m. PT on Tuesday. The gear is now expected to gather its samples and stow them in a small spacecraft atop the lander, which will then lift off in about 48 hours. After that, the ascent vehicle will transfer the samples to an orbiter now circling the moon that will transport them back

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Viomi Technology Co., Ltd Announces Management Change

GUANGZHOU, China, Nov. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Viomi Technology Co., Ltd (“Viomi” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ: VIOT), a leading IoT @ Home technology company in China, today announced that Mr. Shun Jiang has tendered his resignation as Chief Financial Officer of the Company for personal reasons, effective immediately. The Company has commenced the search for Mr. Jiang’s replacement and is committed to moving quickly to fill the role. The Company’s finance team will report to Mr. Xiaoping Chen, Founder, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer of Viomi, in the interim.

Mr. Xiaoping Chen commented, “On behalf of the Board of Directors and management team, I want to thank Mr. Jiang for his contributions to Viomi and wish him all the best in his future endeavors.”

About Viomi Technology

Viomi’s mission is to redefine the future home via the concept of IoT @ Home.

Viomi has

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Investigators say humanity’s oldest sculptures may be linked to climate change, diet — ScienceDaily

One of world’s earliest examples of art, the enigmatic `Venus’ figurines carved some 30,000 years ago, have intrigued and puzzled scientists for nearly two centuries. Now a researcher from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus believes he’s gathered enough evidence to solve the mystery behind these curious totems.

The hand-held depictions of obese or pregnant women, which appear in most art history books, were long seen as symbols of fertility or beauty. But according to Richard Johnson, MD, lead author of the study published today in the journal, Obesity, the key to understanding the statues lays in climate change and diet.

“Some of the earliest art in the world are these mysterious figurines of overweight women from the time of hunter gatherers in Ice Age Europe where you would not expect to see obesity at all,” said Johnson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine

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China’s Chang’e 5 enters lunar orbit for historic attempt to return moon samples

China’s Chang’e 5 spacecraft has entered orbit around the moon ahead of an historic attempt to collect samples from the moon and return to Earth.



a close up of the moon: An artist's illustration of China's Chang'e 5 moon orbiter entering lunar orbit for the country's first moon sample-return mission.


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An artist’s illustration of China’s Chang’e 5 moon orbiter entering lunar orbit for the country’s first moon sample-return mission.

The 18,100-lb. (8,200 kilograms) Chang’e 5 launched on a Long March 5 rocket on Monday (Nov. 23) from the country’s Wenchang Spacecraft Launch Site on Hainan Island and reached the moon today (Nov. 28) after an 112-hour journey. 

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The Chang’e 5 orbiter module fired its main engine at 7:58 a.m. EST (1258 UTC; 8:58 p.m. Beijing time) when 249 miles (400 kilometers) away from the moon, the China Lunar Exploration Program announced just under an hour later.  

In pictures: China on the moon! A History of Chinese lunar missions

The spacecraft fired its 3,000-Newton engine for around 17 minutes. This

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