Is it better to give than receive? Children who experienced compassionate parenting were more generous than peers — ScienceDaily

Young children who have experienced compassionate love and empathy from their mothers may be more willing to turn thoughts into action by being generous to others, a University of California, Davis, study suggests.

In lab studies, children tested at ages 4 and 6 showed more willingness to give up the tokens they had earned to fictional children in need when two conditions were present — if they showed bodily changes when given the opportunity to share and had experienced positive parenting that modeled such kindness. The study initially included 74 preschool-age children and their mothers. They were invited back two years later, resulting in 54 mother-child pairs whose behaviors and reactions were analyzed when the children were 6.

“At both ages, children with better physiological regulation and with mothers who expressed stronger compassionate love were likely to donate more of their earnings,” said Paul Hastings, UC Davis professor of psychology

Read More

Essex 2020 brings online science and history to children

Remember when your chemistry teacher tried to demonstrate an experiment to the class through fire-eating and trapeze skills? No? But it’s 2020 and who says science lessons have to be boring?

We may be stuck at home but youngsters across Essex have been learning about the fascinating worlds of science, technology, engineering, art and maths (STEAM) with the help of some unusual teachers ­— circus artists and dinosaur experts.

As part of the Essex 2020 initiative, schoolchildren have been able to brush up on the curriculum through watching number of colourful STEAM virtual learning workshops which are available for free online. GCSE chemistry, physics biology and PE students, for example, have been learning about their subjects through watching fire breathing stunts and trapeze swinging thanks to Little Stars Circus based in Chelmsford.

Led by founder Dr Diana Entwistle, a professional aerialist and ice skater who also has a PhD in

Read More

Carrying Children In Cargo Bikes Can Be Dangerous, New Report Finds

Cargo bikes are becoming more widely used by transportation and delivery companies. Some studies estimate that in years to come, with the variety of models coming on the market and sales growing rapidly, cargo bikes will be used for about 50% of the delivering of goods. 

Families, too, have recognized the benefits of these increasingly popular modes of transport, but carrying children in them can be dangerous and are only safe if parents strap them in.

Those are the main findings of new research showing that children can safely ride on cargo bikes, but only when the bike is equipped with a seat belt system – and when this system is actually used. The results were released on Thursday by

Read More

EU tech ban seen putting children worldwide at risk of online sex abuse

(Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Online child sexual abuse could become harder to detect due to privacy protections set to take effect in the European Union next month – putting millions of children at increased risk worldwide, critics of the proposals have warned.

Under the changes, big tech firms like Facebook and Microsoft would be banned from using automatic detection tools that are routinely employed to identify material containing images of child abuse, or to detect online grooming.

Opponents say such automatic scanning infringes the privacy of people using chat and messaging apps, but the looming ban has drawn strong criticism around the world – from children’s rights advocates to U.S. actor and tech investor Ashton Kutcher.

“Time is running out to ensure proactive and voluntary online child abuse detection methods are preserved in the EU,” Kutcher wrote on Twitter earlier this month as European lawmakers (MEPs) prepare to vote on

Read More

Why experiences are better gifts for older children — ScienceDaily

What should we get for our kids this holiday? As children get older, giving them something they can experience (live through) instead of material things makes them happier, according to new research led by Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of marketing at the University of Illinois Chicago.

The research, published in the International Journal of Research in Marketing, compared the level of happiness children derive from material goods with the level of happiness they derive from experiences.

Across four studies with children and adolescents, Chaplin and her collaborators demonstrated that children ages 3-12 derive more happiness from material things than from experiences. However, older children derive more happiness from their experiences than from their possessions.

“What this means is, experiences are highly coveted by adolescents, not just expensive material things, like some might think,” Chaplin says.

She goes on to explain, “Don’t get me wrong. Young children do love experiences.

Read More

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is ‘taught a lesson’ — ScienceDaily

Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers — and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows.

Philosophers and psychologists have long argued whether the main reason people punish others for bad behavior is to enact retribution or to impart a moral lesson. In adults, most studies show the answer is that people have both motives. But what about children, who are less steeped in societal values?

“Children are less exposed to social ideas about how to behave in certain ways,” said first author Julia Marshall, who conducted the research in the lab of Molly Crockett, assistant professor of psychology at Yale and senior author of the paper. “We wanted to know if children are interested in punishing others because they want wrongdoers to pay, because they

Read More

PEDSnet report details how COVID-19 pandemic has affected children — ScienceDaily

In the most comprehensive analysis to date of U.S. children tested and treated for COVID-19, an organization representing seven of the nation’s largest pediatric medical centers reports that some groups of children are faring significantly worse than children in general during the pandemic.

Findings from the PEDSnet organization — which includes Cincinnati Children’s — were published Nov. 23, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. The report is based on electronic medical records data from more than 135,000 children who have been tested for infections from the SARS-CoV-2 virus from Jan. 1 through Sept. 8, 2020.

“These findings are important because they improve our understanding of the impact of COVID-19 in the pediatric population,” says Nathan Pajor, MD, a pulmonary medicine specialist at Cincinnati Children’s and a co-author of the study. “We see that relative to adults, kids are less likely to have severe disease or to die from COVID-19. However, we

Read More

Children and adolescents more likely to experience higher rates of depression and anxiety during and after enforced isolation ends — ScienceDaily

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated widespread social isolation, affecting all ages of global society. A new rapid review in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports on the available evidence about children and young people specifically, stating that loneliness is associated with mental health problems, including depression and anxiety-potentially affecting them years later.

The review, which synthesizes over 60 pre-existing, peer-reviewed studies on topics spanning isolation, loneliness and mental health for young people aged between 4 and 21 years of age, found extensive evidence of an association between loneliness and an increased risk of mental health problems for children and young people.

“As school closures continue, indoor play facilities remain closed and at best, young people can meet outdoors in small groups only, chances are that many are lonely (and continue to be so over time),” said lead author, Maria Loades,

Read More

Cesarean section-born children may face higher risk of infection-related hospitalization — ScienceDaily

Children born via cesarean section may be more likely to be hospitalized for infection during early childhood. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Jessica Miller at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Australia and colleagues suggests that compared to vaginally-born children, cesarean-born children may have a higher risk of infection-related hospitalization for up to five years of age.

The global proportion of cesarean section births has nearly doubled since 2000, yet the relationship between mode of birth and common childhood infections beyond the neonatal period is not well understood. To assess the association between mode of birth and infection-related hospitalization, researchers analyzed hospital data of 7,174,787 singleton children in Denmark, Scotland, England, and Australia born between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2015. Children born during this period were followed from their birth-related hospital discharge date until an infection-related hospitalization, death, emigration, 5th birthday, or end of the study period.

Read More

Children with a migration background often misdiagnosed as having an ‘impairment of language acquisition’ — ScienceDaily

Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected “impairment of language acquisition.” In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. A research team of linguists led by Brigitte Eisenwort from the “Outpatient clinic for children with suspected language acquisition impairments” at MedUni Vienna’s Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine has now investigated the problem in the context of a case study. This study applied the “Vienna Model,” which incorporates medical students who are native speakers of the child’s first language to facilitate more accurate diagnosis. The study has now been published in the journal Neuropsychiatrie.

In 2019, an average of around 2.1 million Austrian inhabitants came from a migration background. Due to the changing demographic

Read More