UK, France sign new deal to curb Channel migrant crossings | France

UK interior minister Priti Patel said under the deal the number of officers patrolling French beaches would double.

The United Kingdom and France have signed a new agreement to try to stop undocumented migration across the Channel, upping patrols and technology in the hope of closing off a dangerous route used by migrants and refugees to try to reach the UK on small boats.

UK Home Secretary Priti Patel said that under the deal signed on Saturday the number of officers patrolling French beaches would double, and new equipment including drones and radar would be employed.

“Thanks to more police patrols on French beaches and enhanced intelligence sharing between our security and law enforcement agencies, we are already seeing fewer migrants leaving French beaches,” she said.

Amnesty International called the agreement “profoundly disappointing”.

Aid and human rights groups have said the best way to stop the journeys is to provide

Read More

Britain to curb Google and Facebook with tougher competition rules

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain will impose a new competition regime next year to prevent Google and Facebook using their dominance to push out smaller firms and disadvantage consumers.

The code will be enforced by a dedicated unit within the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), which this year said it needed new laws to keep the tech giants in check.

Google and Facebook dominate digital advertising, accounting for around 80% of 14 billion pounds spent in 2019, Britain’s competition regulator the CMA said.

The two U.S. companies have said they are committed to working with the British government and regulator on digital advertising, including giving users greater control over their data and the ads they are served.

While “unashamedly pro-tech”, Britain’s Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden said there was a growing consensus that the concentration of power in a small number of companies was curtailing growth, reducing innovation and having negative impacts

Read More

Stocks rise on cyclical boost but megacaps curb gains

NEW YORK (Reuters) – U.S. stocks rose in a choppy session on Monday as hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine boosted economically sensitive sectors such as energy and industrials, but a pullback in megacap shares held gains in check.

FILE PHOTO: The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is seen as people walk in silhouette in the financial district of New York, U.S., November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Cyclical sectors led gains, with energy ahead by more than 5% and industrials and financials each up more than 1%, as data showed monthly business activity expanded at the fastest rate in more than five years.

Energy shares also got a boost from oil prices, which have risen on anticipation a vaccine will help demand recover.

But declines in technology and tech-related heavyweight names such as Apple Inc and Facebook Inc muted gains as investors rotated out of stocks seen as safe bets following

Read More

EU auditors: Antitrust probes too slow to curb tech giants

A report says that the EU’s efforts to rein in the power of big tech companies such as Google and Facebook through antitrust investigations have taken too long, dulling their effectiveness

Legal tools available to the bloc’s competition regulators, meanwhile, have not kept pace with digital markets, allowing Silicon Valley giants to eliminate rivals, said the report by the European Court of Auditors, which examined the EU’s enforcement of competition rules over the past decade.

European Union authorities have been at the forefront of global efforts to bring the tech giants to heel but they’ve been criticized for lengthy investigations that have resulted in

Read More

Governments can curb over-fertilization in agriculture — ScienceDaily

The world is awash with nitrogen. In agriculture, nitrogen is used as a fertiliser to increase output, but this causes one of the biggest environmental problems of our time. Nitrogen pollution has detrimental effects on water and soil and is also harmful to human and animal health. What’s more, when the air or rain carry nitrogen into unfertilised habitats, such as bogs or forests, it causes a decline in natural biodiversity.

National governments have it within their power to curb the problem. What is required are national and international policies that steer the global food system towards higher yields and a much lower environmental impact. However, research to date has barely touched on the extent to which countries actually influence their nitrogen pollution and their crop yields.

Quantifying countries’ overall impact

Now, ETH researchers David Wüpper and Robert Finger from the Chair of Agricultural Economics and Policy have joined forces

Read More

China Unveils New Regulations To Curb Antitrust Practices

KEY POINTS

  • Internet platforms not outside of antitrust laws: Regulators
  • A week ago, regulators grounded Ant Group’s $35-billion IPO
  • New rules by regulators for internet transactions will be released by June 2021

Upsetting China’s super-rich and its investors alike, the Communist nation is stepping up efforts to control some of its biggest technology companies in a bid to weed out antitrust practices.

On Tuesday, Beijing announced new regulations to curb monopolistic practices in the internet industry and reduce the influence of big corporations like Alibaba and Tencent in the market, Bloomberg reported. This comes a week after Beijing put new restrictions on the financial markets and in turn, suspended the $35-billion IPO of the Ant Group, which was expected to be the largest on the planet.

With the new regulations, Beijing seeks to create a framework, wherein anti-competitive practices can be stopped. These practices include sharing customer data and mergers

Read More

Millions spent on efforts to curb illegal activity not effective — ScienceDaily

Cities across the country have sought ways to improve neighborhood safety and in recent years have pointed to demolishing abandoned housing as a way to achieve the goal. While millions of dollars have been spent on the efforts, a recent University of Kansas study found a program demolishing more than 500 abandoned residential properties in Kansas City, Missouri, did not significantly reduce nearby violent or property crime.

Since the housing foreclosure crisis of 2007-08, the number of abandoned homes across the country has rapidly increased, drawing attention to dilapidated and abandoned residential properties and their effect on neighborhoods, including elevated crime rates. Hye-Sung Han, assistant professor of public affairs & administration at KU, conducted a study in which she examined 559 abandoned properties in Kansas City, Missouri, and nearby crime rates in the surrounding area. She found the demolition did not lead to a reduction in nearby crime and that

Read More

Voters in Maine and California opt to curb government use of AI tech

  • Global spending on smart city projects is expected to more than double in the next five years.
  • But in a sign of public skepticism of the government’s ability to responsibly use certain smart city technologies, voters in Maine and California voted to limit government use of facial recognition and carceral risk assessment algorithms, respectively.
  • Insider Intelligence publishes hundreds of insights, charts, and forecasts on the Connectivity & Tech industry with the Connectivity & Tech Briefing. You can learn more about subscribing here.

Global spending on smart city projects is expected to more than double in the next five years, growing from $131 billion in 2020 to $295 billion by 2025, per Insider Intelligence estimates from March 2020. Smart city projects promise to reduce commute times by 15-20%, shrink a city’s environmental footprint by 10-30%, and overall make citizens happier and more engaged, per McKinsey.

facial recognition ces A live demonstration uses artificial intelligence and facial recognition in dense crowd spatial-temporal technology at the Horizon Robotics exhibit at the Las Vegas Convention Center during CES 2019 in Las Vegas on January 10, 2019. (Photo by DAVID MCNEW / AFP) (Photo credit should read DAVID MCNEW/AFP via Getty Images)

More cities are beginning to crack

Read More

EU digital boss: New rules to curb big tech aim for fairness

LONDON (AP) — The European Union is set to propose new laws to rein in the power of big tech companies, including measures to ensure customers are protected, smaller rivals are treated fairly, and illegal content is dealt with, the bloc’s digital and antitrust chief said on Thursday.

Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager outlined two draft laws that the EU’s executive Commission plans to introduce in early December. They amount to a sweeping overhaul of digital regulations, though the final version will depend on negotiations with the EU Parliament and the bloc’s 27 member states.

The first, the Digital Services Act, aims to update EU e-commerce rules by making tech companies take more responsibility for dangerous products, such as requiring them to check sellers’ ID in order to weed out “dodgy traders.” But it will also place a greater onus on the companies to deal with illegal content such as

Read More

New rules to curb big tech aim for fairness

LONDON (AP) — The European Union is set to propose new laws to rein in the power of big tech companies, including measures to ensure customers are protected, smaller rivals are treated fairly, and illegal content is dealt with, the bloc’s digital and antitrust chief said on Thursday.



FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020 file photo, European Commissioner for Europe fit for the Digital Age Margrethe Vestager speaks during an online news conference at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels. The European Union is set to propose new laws to rein in the power of big tech companies, including measures to ensure customers are protected, smaller rivals are treated fairly, and illegal content is dealt with, the bloc's digital and antitrust chief said on Thursday, Oct, 29. Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager outlined two draft laws that the EU's executive Commission plans to introduce in early December.  (Yves Herman/Pool Photo via AP, file)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020 file photo, European Commissioner for Europe fit for the Digital Age Margrethe Vestager speaks during an online news conference at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels. The European Union is set to propose new laws to rein in the power of big tech companies, including measures to ensure customers are protected, smaller rivals are treated fairly, and illegal content is dealt with, the bloc’s digital and antitrust chief said on Thursday, Oct, 29. Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager outlined two draft laws that the EU’s executive Commission plans to

Read More