More evidence that cellular ‘death by iron’ could be promising avenue of cancer treatment — ScienceDaily

If there is a silver lining in cancer’s chaotic biology, it’s that the same traits that give cancer cells a growth advantage often present opportunities for sabotaging them.

That’s the central idea behind a new research paper published November 23 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by Xuejun Jiang, a cell biologist in the Sloan Kettering Institute, and Craig Thompson, President and CEO of Memorial Sloan Kettering. They found that cancer cells often exhibit metabolic changes that make them vulnerable to a particular type of cell death called ferroptosis.

Ferroptosis — literally, death by iron — is often triggered by oxidative stress, the buildup in cells of free radicals and other corrosive chemicals that are byproducts of using oxygen to burn fuel for energy. But many cancer cells, which need abundant amounts of energy to grow and divide, have found a way around this problem.

“Genetic mutations

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Glucosamine may reduce overall death rates as effectively as regular exercise, study suggests — ScienceDaily

Glucosamine supplements may reduce overall mortality about as well as regular exercise does, according to a new epidemiological study from West Virginia University.

“Does this mean that if you get off work at five o’clock one day, you should just skip the gym, take a glucosamine pill and go home instead?” said Dana King, professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, who led the study. “That’s not what we suggest. Keep exercising, but the thought that taking a pill would also be beneficial is intriguing.”

He and his research partner, Jun Xiang — a WVU health data analyst — assessed data from 16,686 adults who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010. All of the participants were at least 40 years old. King and Xiang merged these data with 2015 mortality figures.

After controlling for various factors — such as participants’ age, sex,

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The Future Of Death Tech

The death of a friend or family member can be one of the most traumatizing experiences of their life. In recent months, because of the Covid-19 pandemic, many people have come to realize the importance of coming together emotionally, while staying physically apart. This has led to death tech startups introducing technologies that allow mourners to deal with death in new, compassionate, and even more environmentally sustainable ways.

 While technology cannot replace the feeling of physical togetherness, it can stimulate a sense of togetherness in times when physical connection is difficult. Virtual funerals enable mourners to keep in communication with those most important to us in the midst of a global crisis.

One such company, a death tech app called Everydays, allows families to plan funerals and share memories from thousands of miles apart. While physical gatherings are ideal, Everydays allows users to mourn from remote locations, so they

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The Life and Death of the Instagram Influencer Who Never Was

Instagram is full of wannabes, but there was only one Sylvia. Describing herself as a “coffee-operated robot living her best life,” Sylvia was born in May 2020, made her online debut on July 4 at the age of 30, and passed away last week at the grand old age of 80.

Sylvia made a lot of friends in that brief window of time, saw a lot of people sliding into her DMs, and experienced everything a woman could in cyberspace, from protestations of love from middle-aged men to innocent requests for boy advice from 13-year-old girls. Much of this surfaced at an emotional online wake for Sylvia, which was held online as part of documentary festival IDFA’s new media strand, after Ziv Schneider’s art project had its world premiere in the DocLab Competition for Digital Storytelling.

One of the inspirations for Schneider’s creation was Lil Miquela, a 19-year-old Brazilian-American girl

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Research suggests that sharp rise in water temperatures led to death and disappearance of some species from the shallow water of Israeli shores — ScienceDaily

Researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) embarked on an underwater journey to solve a mystery: Why did sponges of the Agelas oroides species, which used to be common in the shallow waters along the Mediterranean coast of Israel, disappear? Today, the species can be found in Israel mainly in deep habitats that exist at a depth of 100 meters (330 feet).

The researchers believe that the main reason for the disappearance of the sponges was the rise in seawater temperatures during the summer months, which in the past 60 years have risen by about 3°C (37°F).

The study was led by Professor Micha Ilan and PhD student Tal Idan of TAU’s School of Zoology at the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences and Steinhardt Museum of Natural History. The article was published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science in November 2020.

“Sponges are marine animals of great importance

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One-of-a-kind fossil shows T. rex and Triceratops locked in battle to the death

When you imagine dinosaurs battling it out, the first match-up that comes to mind is Triceratops vs. T. rex. In our collective imagination they are fighting eternally. It’s the clash of the titans. But did these battles actually take place?



a herd of cattle walking across a river: Artist Anthony Hutchings' rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences


© Provided by CNET
Artist Anthony Hutchings’ rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

Yes. Yes they did. We have the fossil to prove it, and for the first time ever, the public will be able to take a look.

The fossil — nicknamed “Dueling Dinosaurs” — was initially discovered in 2006, but until now has only been seen by a select few. It shows a T. rex and a Triceratops in mid-battle, literally fighting to the death. The pair are preserved in a fossil going on display for the first time at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, The

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Researchers connect blood clots to an increased risk of death from COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

While respiratory issues continue to be the most common symptom of a COVID-19 infection, new research indicates the disease could also be associated with hypercoagulability, or increased tendency of the blood to clot. In a new study published November 20, 2020 in the journal EClinical Medicine by The Lancet, researchers from UC San Diego Health found that blood clots led to an increased risk of death by 74 percent.

Led by Mahmoud Malas, MD, division chief of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery at UC San Diego Health, researchers reviewed 42 different studies involving more than 8,000 patients diagnosed with COVID-19. Using random models, the team produced summary rates and odds ratios of mortality in COVID-19 patients with thromboembolism, blood clots — and compared them to patients without these conditions to determine what effect blood clots may have on risk of death.

“We began to notice a really unusual manifestation of

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Incredible fossil shows T. rex and Triceratops locked in battle to the death

When you imagine dinosaurs battling it out, the first match-up that comes to mind is Triceratops vs. T. rex. In our collective imagination they are fighting eternally. It’s the clash of the titans. But did these battles actually take place?



a herd of cattle walking across a river: Artist Anthony Hutchings' rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences


© Provided by CNET
Artist Anthony Hutchings’ rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

Yes. Yes they did. We have the fossil to prove it and for the first time ever, the public will be able to take a look.

The fossil — nicknamed “Dueling Dinosaurs” — was initially discovered in 2006, but until now has only been seen by a select few. It shows a T. rex and a Triceratops in mid-battle, literally fighting to the death. The pair are preserved in a fossil going on display for the first time at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, The

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How We Build Cities Is Literally A Matter Of Life And Death

Covid-19 has been a monumental wake-up call across generations – succinctly put, a health crisis for older people and an economic crisis for the young. It calls for a substantial overhaul of the way elder care is provided, in light of the disproportionately high death rates in nursing homes—47 percent of recorded coronavirus deaths across 26 countries. 

But so far, there hasn’t been discussion of an equivalent overhaul for young people, who appear to be the most deeply impacted, long term, on social and financial levels. Millions of young workers filed for unemployment since Covid-19 hit, and many young adults are hitting the pause button on getting married or having kids.  Here I’d like to discuss how living conditions for young and old, particularly those in cities, needs to be newly envisioned to support life and promulgate social instincts, rather than foster isolation and death.

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Death, rehospitalization, and problems with basic activities, jobs, mental health and finances seen in many patients treated at 38 Michigan hospitals — ScienceDaily

Surviving a case of COVID-19 that’s bad enough to land you in the hospital is hard enough. But life after the hospital stay — and especially after an intensive care stay — is no bed of roses, either, according to a new study.

Within two months of leaving the hospital, nearly 7% of the patients had died, including more than 10% of the patients treated in an ICU. Fifteen percent had ended up back in the hospital. The data come from more than 1,250 patients treated in 38 hospitals across Michigan this spring and summer, when the state was one of the earliest to experience a peak in cases.

When researchers interviewed 488 of the surviving patients by phone around 60 days after their hospitalization, they heard a litany of health and life woes. They’ve published their findings in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

“These data suggest that the

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