Researchers discover life in deep ocean sediments at or above water’s boiling point — ScienceDaily

An international research team that included three scientists from the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography has discovered single-celled microorganisms in a location where they didn’t expect to find them.

“Water boils on the (Earth’s) surface at 100 degrees Celsius, and we found organisms living in sediments at 120 degrees Celsius,” said URI Professor of Oceanography Arthur Spivack, who led the geochemistry efforts of the 2016 expedition organized by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology and Germany’s MARUM-Center for Marine and Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen. The study was carried out as part of the work of Expedition 370 of the International Ocean Discovery Program.

The research results from a two-month-long expedition in 2016 will be published today in the journal Science.

The news follows an announcement in October that microbial diversity below the seafloor is as rich as on Earth’s surface. Researchers

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Voyager Probes Spot Previously Unknown Phenomenon in Deep Space

Artistic conception of a Voyager spacecraft.

Artistic conception of a Voyager spacecraft.
Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Voyager spacecraft may be billions of miles away and over 40 years old, but they’re still making significant discoveries, as new research reveals.

A paper published today in the Astronomical Journal describes an entirely new form of electron burst, a discovery made possible by the intrepid Voyager probes. These bursts are happening in the interstellar medium, a region of space in which the density of matter is achingly thin. As the new paper points out, something funky is happening to cosmic ray electrons that are making their way through this remote area: They’re being reflected and boosted to extreme speeds by advancing shock waves produced by the Sun.

By itself, this process, in which shock waves push particles, is nothing new. What is new, however, is that these bursts of electrons are appearing far ahead of the advancing

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Singapore wants co-investors to pump $112M into deep tech startups

Singapore is seeking co-investors from the private sector with the goal to plow up to SG$150 million into its early-stage, deep tech startup community. It hopes to identify 10 to 15 such partners and target startups in three key sectors including health and biomedical sciences. 

Led by Enterprise Singapore’s investment arm Seeds Capital, the initiative will tap funds from the Startup SG Equity scheme, under which the government may invest in funds or work with qualified third-party investors to make direct co-investments into eligible startups.

With the new call-for-partnership, Seeds said in a statement Thursday it aimed to refresh and diversity its current pool of 30 co-investment partners across the three deep tech sectors, including advanced manufacturing and engineering as well as urban solutions and sustainability. These market segments were aligned with the country’s Research, Innovation, and Enterprise 2020 (RIE2020) Technology Domains, which aimed to boost Singapore’s research capabilities and

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How IISc’s Society for Innovation and Development (SID) supports Deep Science startu

[This article is part of Startup Hatch, a series by YourStory on incubators, accelerators, makerspaces, and coworking spaces in the startup ecosystem. See earlier profiles of initiatives at IIT BombayIIM Bangalore, BITS PilaniNCLTata Elxsi, AxilorNIDIIIT-BangaloreIIIT-HyderabadVellore Institute of TechnologyPSG CoimbatoreElectropreneur Park, Workbench ProjectsMakers AsylumNetApp Excellerator, TechStars, Indigram Labs, WeWork, Z Nation Lab, Sandbox Startups, Brigade REAP, Target India Accelerator, Maersk, Anthill Studio, UnternehmerTUM, AZO, EXIST, InsurTech Hub Munich, Afthonia Lab, Supreme Incubator, CoWorks Foundry, and Ashoka Innovators.]

CS Murali is the Chairman of STEM Cell, SID (Society for Innovation and Development), at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc). He was earlier the Chief of Corporate Affairs at Cognizant Technology Solutions; Operating Partner at Connect Capital Ventures; Chief Operating Officer at HP Globalsoft; and President and CEO of

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Mars microbes may have been able to live deep below the planet’s surface

This processed image shows a sideways view of a water-carved channel on Mars.


ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO. 3D rendered and colored by Lujendra Ojha

Humanity is super-stoked about the idea of finding signs of ancient life on Mars. So much so we keep sending increasingly more advanced machines, like NASA’s Perseverance rover, to search for evidence. But we might need to take a much deeper look into the matter, a new study suggests. 

A research team led by Rutgers University planetary scientist Lujendra Ojha examined a perplexing problem when it comes to the long-ago habitability of Mars: the paradox of the faint young sun.

The sun wasn’t always the perky ball of heat and light we know today. “About 4 billion years ago, the sun was much fainter so the climate of

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Mars microbes may have been able to live deep below planet’s surface

This processed image shows a sideways view of a water-carved channel on Mars.


ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO. 3D rendered and colored by Lujendra Ojha

Humanity is super-stoked about the idea of finding signs of ancient life on Mars. So stoked we keep sending increasingly more advanced machines, like NASA’s Perseverance rover, to search for evidence. A new study suggests we might need to take a much deeper look into the matter. 

A research team led by Rutgers University planetary scientist Lujendra Ojha examined a perplexing problem when it comes to the long-ago habitability of Mars: the paradox of the faint young sun.

The sun wasn’t always the perky ball of heat and light we know today. “About 4 billion years ago, the sun was much fainter so the climate of early Mars

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Transportation of water into the deep Earth by Al-phase D — ScienceDaily

Researchers have recently measured the propagation speed of ultrasonic waves in an aluminum-rich hydrous mineral called Al-phase D at pressure conditions relevant to the Earth’s deep mantle. Their results suggest that seismic shear anomalies observed locally beneath subduction zones may reveal the presence of hydrous minerals in the uppermost lower mantle, which would have important implications for the Earth’s interior because hydrogen affects considerably the physical and chemical properties of mantle minerals.

Since the discovery of a water-bearing ringwoodite specimen trapped in a superdeep diamond from Brazil by Pearson et al., in 2014 (published in Nature), there is a regained interest for finding and characterizing the potential carrier and host minerals of water in the deep Earth’s interior. Among the candidate minerals, Dense Hydrous Magnesium Silicates (DHMSs) are considered as primary water carriers from the shallow lithosphere to the deep mantle transition zone (MTZ; 410-660 km in depth), but

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Australian Telescope Maps Deep Space at Record Speed | Top News

MELBOURNE (Reuters) – A powerful new telescope in outback Australia has mapped vast areas of the universe in record-breaking time, revealing a million new galaxies and opening the way to new discoveries, the country’s national science agency said on Tuesday.

The radio telescope, dubbed the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), was able to map about three million galaxies in just 300 hours. Comparable surveys of the sky have taken as long as 10 years.

“It’s really a game changer,” said astronomer David McConnell, who led the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) study of the southern sky at the Murchison Radioastronomy Observatory in Western Australia.

What makes this telescope unique is its wide field of view, using receivers designed by CSIRO, which allow it to take panoramic pictures of the sky in sharper detail than before.

The telescope only needed to combine 903 images to map the sky,

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New technology to create fuel and oxygen on Mars could help humans explore the deep sea here on Earth

  • A new technology developed by a team of engineers at the Washington University in St Louis can directly coerce oxygen and hydrogen from salty water, making the process much cheaper.
  • When humans eventually do visit Mars, this new technology could help them breathe on the alien planet and create fuel for the trip back home.
  • Meanwhile, on Earth, the same technology could allow for longer submarine missions and deep-sea exploration of uncharted waters.

A new technology that turns Mars’ salty water into fuel and oxygen could be an even bigger boon for defence and exploration here on Earth.

Taking briny water and turning it into hydrogen and oxygen isn’t easy. Still, engineers at the Washington University in St Louis have found a new way to coerce oxygen and hydrogen directly from saltwater.

The process can produce 25 times more oxygen than the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilisation Experiment (MOXIE) using

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Global Deep Sea Mining Technology Market 2020 Emerging Technologies, Opportunity Assessment, Projections and Future Opportunities by 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 29, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
MarketQuest.biz has recently published Global Deep Sea Mining Technology Market 2020 by Company, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025, assuming the historical data of the market to forecasts time-period from 2020 to 2025. The report thoroughly evaluates the current trends, market drivers, opportunities, and restraints to provide a clear understanding of the current market landscape of the global Deep Sea Mining Technology market. It thoroughly evaluates the current trends, market drivers, opportunities, and restraints. The report focuses on industry competitors, the sales channel, growth potential, market trends, industry product innovations, and the volume of size, market segments, and market share of the best performers or products.

Report Overview:

Present market trends and dynamics are evaluated which helps in planning the way of the global Deep Sea Mining Technology

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