Scientists develop an energy-efficient strategy to reversibly change ‘spin orientation’ or magnetization direction in magnetite at room temperature — ScienceDaily

Over the last few decades, conventional electronics has been rapidly reaching its technical limits in computing and information technology, calling for innovative devices that go beyond the mere manipulation of electron current. In this regard, spintronics, the study of devices that exploit the “spin” of electrons to perform functions, is one of the hottest areas in applied physics. But, measuring, altering, and, in general, working with this fundamental quantum property is no mean feat.

Current spintronic devices — for example, magnetic tunnel junctions — suffer from limitations such as high-power consumption, low operating temperatures, and severe constraints in material selection. To this end, a team of scientists at Tokyo University of Science and the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Japan, has recently published a study in ACS Nano, in which they present a surprisingly simple yet efficient strategy to manipulate the magnetization angle in magnetite (Fe3O

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Direction decided by rate of coin flip in quantum world — ScienceDaily

Flip a coin. Heads? Take a step to the left. Tails? Take a step to the right. In the quantum world? Go in both directions at once, like a wave spreading out. Called the walker analogy, this random process can be applied in both classical and quantum algorithms used in state-of-the-art technologies such as artificial intelligence and data search processes. However, the randomness also makes the walk difficult to control, making it more difficult to precisely design systems.

A research team based in Japan may be moving toward a more controlled walk by unveiling the mechanism underlying the directional decision of each quantum step and introducing a way to potentially control the direction of movement. They published their results on October 16 in Scientific Reports, a Nature Research journal.

“In our study, we focused on the coin determining the behavior of the quantum walk to explore controllability,” said paper

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Japan PM’s meddling in science panel a ‘dangerous direction’: scholars

By Rocky Swift



Yoshihide Suga wearing a suit and tie sitting in front of a curtain: FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: Yoshihide Suga speaks during a news conference following his confirmation as Prime Minister of Japan in Tokyo


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: Yoshihide Suga speaks during a news conference following his confirmation as Prime Minister of Japan in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Scholars excluded from Japan’s top science advisory panel said the move was unconstitutional and a dangerous sign of how newly installed Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga will wield power.

Suga broke precedent in rejecting membership to six scholars to the Science Council of Japan (SCJ), a body set up after World War Two to provide independent scientific input for policy-making.

The spurned academics had previously criticised government policy, including 2015 laws to allow Japanese troops to fight overseas.

Among the six were legal and constitutional scholars who said Suga’s move was illegal and could prompt both parliamentary and criminal inquiries.

One of them, Ritsumeikan University law professor Takaaki Matsumiya told reporters on Friday that Suga was acting “similar to a dictator.”

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Japan PM’s meddling in science panel a ‘dangerous direction’

By Rocky Swift

TOKYO (Reuters) – Scholars excluded from Japan’s top science advisory panel said the move was unconstitutional and a dangerous sign of how newly installed Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga will wield power.

Suga broke precedent in rejecting membership to six scholars to the Science Council of Japan (SCJ), a body set up after World War Two to provide independent scientific input for policy-making.

The spurned academics had previously criticised government policy, including 2015 laws to allow Japanese troops to fight overseas.

Among the six were legal and constitutional scholars who said Suga’s move was illegal and could prompt both parliamentary and criminal inquiries.

One of them, Ritsumeikan University law professor Takaaki Matsumiya told reporters on Friday that Suga was acting “similar to a dictator.”

“He is reinterpreting Article 15 of the constitution in a way that he will be able to appoint or dismiss all public servants just

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