Scientists develop an energy-efficient strategy to reversibly change ‘spin orientation’ or magnetization direction in magnetite at room temperature — ScienceDaily

Over the last few decades, conventional electronics has been rapidly reaching its technical limits in computing and information technology, calling for innovative devices that go beyond the mere manipulation of electron current. In this regard, spintronics, the study of devices that exploit the “spin” of electrons to perform functions, is one of the hottest areas in applied physics. But, measuring, altering, and, in general, working with this fundamental quantum property is no mean feat.

Current spintronic devices — for example, magnetic tunnel junctions — suffer from limitations such as high-power consumption, low operating temperatures, and severe constraints in material selection. To this end, a team of scientists at Tokyo University of Science and the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Japan, has recently published a study in ACS Nano, in which they present a surprisingly simple yet efficient strategy to manipulate the magnetization angle in magnetite (Fe3O

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Make your home more energy-efficient for $5 a month

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This story is part of Tech for a Better World, stories about the diverse teams creating products, apps and services to improve our lives and society.

Maybe you want to take steps toward more sustainable living in your home, but don’t know where to start? On Thursday, consumer technology company Arcadia launched a $5-a-month subscription service that lets you power your home with renewable energy from wind and solar farms. 

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Your payment goes toward renewable energy certificates, which track renewable energy in the power grid. When a wind, solar, hydro or geothermal power plan produces 1 megawatt-hour of electricity, it creates one renewable energy certificate. The service aims to get people to invest more in community solar energy projects and increase clean energy sources in the grid. 

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Spin Hall effect in Weyl semimetal for energy-efficient information technology

Spin Hall effect in Weyl semimetal for Energy-efficient Information Technology
Fig 1. A schematic presentation of spin Hall effect in Weyl semimetal 1T’ WTe2, showing the separation of spin-polarized electrons (up and down spin) on the surfaces of a sample by just passing a charge current. Credit: Bing Zhao

The discovery of topological Weyl semimetals in 2017 has revealed opportunities to realize several extraordinary physical phenomena in condensed matter physics. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated the direct electrical detection of a large spin Hall effect in this topological quantum material. Weyl semimetal takes advantage of its strong spin-orbit coupling and novel topological spin-polarized electronic states in its band structure. These experimental findings can pave the way for the utilization of spin-orbit induced phenomena in developing next-generation of faster and energy-efficient information technology and have been published in the scientific journal Physical Review Research.


As our society is becoming more integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) and Internet-of-Things

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