11 Expert Tips For Young Tech Execs Recovering From A Devastating Hack

Dealing with a major systems hack doesn’t just mean addressing the present problem; it also requires building better protections so it’s less likely to happen again. This can be especially challenging for young tech executives with minimal experience troubleshooting, diagnosing and revamping vulnerable systems.

The seasoned tech leaders of Forbes Technology Council have experience both in overcoming hacks and taking important steps to improve security. Below, they offer actionable tips to help new tech execs recover from a hack and shore up their defenses.

1. Minimize platform complexity.

Take steps to reduce future platform complexity to better identify areas of risk. Whether it’s systems, networking or software architecture, the more complex the system, the harder it is to secure. If you implement a more modular design and reduce the number of tools, libraries and languages being used, there is less opportunity for vulnerabilities to get introduced. – Chris Sullivan,

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3 DevOps Trends Tech Execs Need To Know For 2021

Get—and stay—ahead of the curve with these vital emerging technologies. 

If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that none of us have a crystal ball vision into the future. But as we head into 2021, I feel confident making at least one prediction: Digital experiences and solutions will only become more and more important.    

After all, digital capabilities were the key to developing and deploying rapid innovation during the pandemic.  

Take American University. Using automated workflows, they reduced the time it takes to set up remote virtual teams in Microsoft Teams from 29 hours to just 8 minutes. And they’re not alone in quickly implementing new innovations, due in part to the adoption of agile principles inherent in a DevOps-centric approach to technology.  

As we head into 2021, there are three trends within DevOps that will further accelerate the pace of 

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Zuckerberg says Facebook execs expected Trump to falsely claim victory

Mark Zuckerberg has said that Facebook fully expected Donald Trump to falsely claim electoral fraud, saying that they had put into place policies in September in anticipation of the president’s actions.



a close up of Mark Zuckerberg looking at the camera


© Provided by The Independent


The Facebook CEO testified at a congressional hearing on Tuesday, called to explore the content moderation practices of Facebook and Twitter, as Republicans accuse social media companies of censoring conservative speech.

In October, Republican politicians on the Senate judiciary committee voted unanimously to approve formal summons for Mr Zuckerberg and Mr Dorsey. Democrats on the panel did not vote on the subpoena.

The subpoenas were approved right after the social media platforms decided to block stories from the New York Post that made claims about the son of then-Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

Cory Booker, senator for New Jersey, said the US was “in dangerous waters”, adding that if what is going on in

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A Boeing Exec’s $20 Million Bet on Teaching College Students to Think

BLACKSBURG, Va.—It’s been a choppy ride for many of the folks relying on paychecks from Boeing Co. Slammed by the pandemic and the grounding of its most important plane, the aerospace giant said recently that it expects to end 2021 with 30,000 fewer workers than it started this year.

“Decisions like these are not easy,” Boeing Chief Executive David Calhoun said on a webcast. These job cuts come as the airline industry weathers an unprecedented travel drought and Boeing endures a “year that is among the most difficult in our 100-year history.”

Even as Mr. Calhoun shows current employees the exit, he is pushing forward a program at Virginia Tech, his alma mater, designed to better prepare the next-generation’s workforce to avoid a similar fate.

An accountant by training, the 63-year-old executive recently told me Corporate America mislabels what he calls a “discovery gap” as the “skills gap.” Colleges, he

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Singapore looks to woo global tech execs with special visa

FILE PHOTO: A view of the central business district in Singapore May 24, 2018. REUTERS/Edgar Su

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Singapore on Thursday announced a new work visa for foreign executives of technology firms, a sector the low-tax global business hub hopes will power future economic growth.

Under the Tech.Pass programme launching in January, up to 500 experienced executives can apply for the two-year visas, which allow participants to operate a business, invest in or become a director in Singapore-based companies, and mentor start-ups.

“Tech.Pass will add to the critical mass of established tech talent in Singapore and create a flywheel effect to further strengthen our position as a leading tech hub for the region,” trade minister Chan Chun Sing said, announcing the programme.

Armed with lucrative grants and incentives, Singapore has in recent years been ramping up its efforts to lure tech firms and investors, including global players like Facebook,

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Mastercard execs share a vision of an advanced global payment system

  • According to a recent Mastercard global consumer study, more consumers are using contactless cards or their smartphone to make payments, noting a large increase in the use of digital wallets.
  • Because of the economic trends prompted by the pandemic, two Mastercard executives predict a future in which passwords and one-time pins, powerful tools to verify transactions in the present, will become relics of the past.
  • Ari Sarker, co-president of Mastercard, Asia Pacific, and Sandeep Malhotra, the company’s executive vice president of products and innovation, share their vision of what an advanced global payment system might look like for consumers and merchants.
  • Because of his work, Business Insider named Ari Sarker to our annual list of the 10 leaders transforming finance in Asia.
  • Visit Business Insider’s Transforming Business homepage for more stories.

The COVID-19 outbreak has accelerated the adoption of digital tools that allow us to work from home, shop

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Juggle secures $2.1M to expand its ‘flexible work’ SaaS marketplace for senior execs

As we’ve seen, some startups are pivoting to re-model themselves for the radically different world of the COVID-19 pandemic. But others literally turned out to have a business model which, although they could never have realized it at the time, might have been (almost) tailored-made for this era.

A fascinating example of this is SaaS marketplace Juggle. Originally designed as a marketplace to allow executive-level women to re-enter the world of work in a flexible manner after having a family, it later expanded into a wider market for anyone wanting to work flexibly and for employers who need that kind of workforce. But now, with the world of work totally upended by the pandemic, ‘flexibility’ is literally now the name of the game.

It’s now disclosed its funding of $2.1 million from investors in the UK and the US. Investors include a number of the UK’s leading angels, and also

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The Political Donations Of Top Video Game Execs

Illustration for article titled The Political Donations Of Top Video Game Execs

Image: Activision

An elderly man contest is happening today. It is the product not of a functioning democracy, but a system fueled by corporate lobbying, vast fortunes, and the whims of the wealthy. So let’s have a look at what some video game executives have been up to recently.

(This information was obtained using OpenSecrets.org, a database of federal campaign contributions and lobbying data.)

Bobby Kotick (CEO, Activision)

Illustration for article titled The Political Donations Of Top Video Game Execs

Image: OpenSecrets.org

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Marc Merrill (Co-chairman, Riot Games)

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Strauss Zelnick (CEO, Take-Two Interactive)

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Gabe Newell (President, Valve)

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Phil Spencer (Executive VP of gaming, Microsoft)

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Robert Altman (CEO, ZeniMax)

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Mike Morhaime (Former CEO, Blizzard)

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Humam Sakhnini (President, King Digital Entertainment)

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Emmett Shear (CEO, Twitch)

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Soylent Founder’s Unhinged Politics Rant Shows Tech Execs Don’t Understand the World

“I am so sick of politics. Politics are suddenly everywhere. I cannot avoid them.” Another 5,300 words follow these declarations, written by Soylent co-founder, former CEO, and current chairman Rob Rhinehart in a blog to explain why he is voting for Kanye West in the 2020 general election. 

The blog, which starts somewhat normal and becomes increasingly bizarre, is rife with conspiracy theories. At one point, he seemingly invents a conspiracy theory about former Vice President Joe Biden, who he professes at one point to have “never heard of until very recently.” 

“Did you know Biden threw innocent Guatemalans in jail because they did not give a government contract to his company Hunter Medical Devices?” he asks, with no hyperlinks or evidence. A Google search for “Hunter Medical Devices” turns up just three pages of results with no relevant hits aside from Rhinehart’s own blog. 

In the blog, Rhinehart describes

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SF tech execs apologize for addicting features in Netflix doc

During the writing of this article, I visited Facebook at least a dozen times, fell into just as many Twitter doomscrolls, and I’m a bit embarrassed to admit, made a few swipes on a dating app.

I barely noticed it, but in the process, every refresh likely came with a new ad sold to the highest bidder.

Social media has given the world many wonderful things, and in exchange it has shattered our attention spans and turned us into tech industry cash cows. For many people, myself included, daily life has started to feel like a series of push notifications. Some of my workday social media fidgeting is necessary to do my job, with companies like Facebook squeezing dollars out of me even as I research stories. And these apps have so many potential distractions that oftentimes I’ll forget why I even went to them in the first place.

The

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