Business Insider names top 36 public relation experts in technology

  • Tech companies have no shortage of PR needs, whether it’s handling crises like antitrust concerns or promoting a new product.
  • Business Insider identified 36 top public relations pros working in the tech industry.
  • They include names from venture capital firms, SaaS companies, startups, established PR firms, and small agencies.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tech companies are often in the news for issues ranging from antitrust concerns to unsavory content proliferating on their platforms.

But besides tamping down crises, these companies also need to promote their products and drive sales.

To do that, they turn to public relations professionals to win over journalists and pitch stories.

Business Insider identified 36 of the top PR pros working in tech. They represent everything from tech giants and enterprise software companies to startups and small agencies.

The list includes well-known Silicon Valley PR’s like Ash Spiegelberg, partner and head of the

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Ash Carter: How the U.S. Congress and STEM Experts Must Work Together

The incoming Biden-Harris administration brings hope that scientific expertise will once again be a cornerstone of good governance. 

There are good reasons to expect that Washington will do so. As President-elect Biden said during his victory speech, “Americans have called on us to marshal…the forces of science and the forces of hope in the great battles of our time.”

We are in the midst of one such great battle now. Despite promising news on several potential vaccines, COVID-19’s trajectory of cases portends a dark pandemic winter. 

At times like these, we need all hands on deck. Especially critical to our efforts will be enlisting more scientists and technologists into the policymaking process. So, let me speak directly to those engineers, coders, geneticists, and others on the front lines of innovation who may be considering public service. 

Any service to the country is valuable. Should you decide that the best way

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Startup founded by ‘Love Lab’ experts releases new platform and tech tools to assess relationships

(Affective Software Image)

Affective Software Inc., the startup founded by the leaders of the famed Gottman Institute, is releasing a new portal and products to harness technology in assessing and improving relationships.

The startup, which first revealed its plans back in May, has raised $400,000 in new funding from angel investors, adding to previous seed funding and bringing the company’s total to date to $2.9 million.

Affective Software was co-founded by Drs. John and Julie Gottman, who found fame with their research-based love and therapy Institute and the so-called “Love Lab,” which opened in 1986 at the University of Washington and was considered at the time to be the world’s original couples laboratory.

Microsoft veteran Rafael Lisitsa, a longtime engineer and technology executive, is also a co-founder and is Affective’s CEO and president.

The startup uses artificial intelligence and machine learning technology to bring the Gottman’s techniques to personal computing

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Wiping down groceries? Experts say keep risk in perspective

NEW YORK (AP) — Cleaning wipes are harder to find on store shelves, and businesses are reassuring customers with stepped up sanitation measures. In New York, the subway system is shut down nightly for disinfecting.

To avoid any traces of the coronavirus that might be lurking on surfaces, Americans have been wiping down groceries, wearing surgical gloves when they go out and leaving mail packages out for an extra day or two. But experts say the national fixation on scrubbing sparked by the pandemic can sometimes be overkill.

“It’s important to clean surfaces, but not to obsess about it too much in a way that can be unhealthy,” said Dr. John Brooks, chief medical officer for the COVID-19 response at the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control.

Health officials knew less about the virus in the early days of the pandemic, but say it’s become clearer the main way it

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U.S. should look at how other high-income countries regulate health care costs, experts urge — ScienceDaily

Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States’ health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study.

The study, published in the journal Health Affairs, examined how other high-income countries that use a fee-for-service model regulate health care costs.

Although the United States has the highest health care prices in the world, the specific mechanisms commonly used by other countries to set and update prices are often overlooked. In most countries with universal health insurance, physicians are paid on a fee-for-service basis, yet health care prices there are lower than in the U.S. To lower health care spending, American policymakers have focused on eliminating fee-for-service reimbursement, which provides an incentive for performing additional services rather than setting up price negotiations to address the main factor that drives health care spending.

U.S. policy

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Students, SRS experts engage in ‘STEMulating’ conversations | Savannah River Site

Students are becoming pen pals with Savannah River Site employees whose degrees and careers involve science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in a new program called “STEMulating Conversations with SRS Experts.”

To date, 74 teachers and academic officials from local schools have enrolled in the pilot program in which K-12 grade students send letters via email to the SRS experts to learn about a range of STEM careers.

Managed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, STEMulating Conversations offers students the opportunity to develop career aspirations and interests in STEM by communicating with scientists, engineers, IT, and other STEM professionals from SRS.

Through this program, they can ask SRS experts questions about STEM and their careers.

Students in the STEM Lab at Diamond Lakes Elementary in Hephzibah, Georgia, have been exchanging information with chemical engineer Joel Maul and electrical engineer Pamela Finklin at SRS. Their different engineering focuses give students a variety

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How 3 Experts Think About Stock Market Volatility

2020 has been a brutally volatile year for stocks. While the market is on track to finish solidly higher than it started on an incredible bounce back from the lows of late March, plenty of individual investors haven’t enjoyed the same successes as the overall market. 

On the Oct. 26 edition of “The Wrap” on Motley Fool Live, host Jason Hall engaged Motley Fool contributor Brian Feroldi and analyst Emily Flippen in a conversation about strategies to deal with the market’s volatility. Looking to improve your returns and better manage the market’s ups and downs? These three experts explain how they manage it in their own investing practices. 

Jason Hall: What I want to do is just have a little round table conversation. What do you do? What’s your process? How do you think about volatility and how does it form your investing decisions?

Brian Feroldi: I came prepared.

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Artificial intelligence could be used to hack connected cars, drones warn security experts

Cyber criminals could exploit emerging technologies including artificial intelligence and machine learning to help conduct attacks against autonomous cars, drones and Internet of Things-connected vehicles, according to a report from the United Nations, Europol and cybersecurity company Trend Micro.

While AI and machine learning can bring “enormous benefits” to society, the same technologies can also bring a range of threats that can enhance current forms of crime or even lead to the evolution of new malicious activity.

“As AI applications start to make a major real-world impact, it’s becoming clear that this will be a fundamental technology for our future,” said Irakli Beridze, head of the Centre for AI and Robotics at the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute. “However, just as the benefits to society of AI are very real, so is the threat of malicious use,” he added.

SEE: Cybersecurity: Let’s get tactical (ZDNet/TechRepublic special feature)

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Data Experts and Enthusiasts From All Over APAC to Get Together at Denodo’s Virtual Annual User Conference

SINGAPORE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov 18, 2020–

Denodo, the leader in data virtualization, today announced it will be hosting its 3 rd annual user conference, Denodo DataFest, in APAC. Denodo DataFest 2020 will be webcasted as a two-day event with half-day programs scheduled for each day. The event brings together some of the most respectable and well known industry and subject matter experts from across the APAC region, to share their experiences and insights on why logical data fabric, enabled by data virtualization, is the future of data management and the backbone of today’s and tomorrow’s digital enterprises.

Register for the online live stream across APAC, here.

“We are thrilled to be participating in Denodo DataFest 2020 and sharing our logical data fabric journey,” said Johan de Coning, business intelligence manager at Silver Chain Group, Australia. “Data virtualization has been one of the most critical components of our enterprise

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Sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly.

NIST’s superconducting thermometer measures temperatures below 1 Kelvin (minus 272.15 ?C or minus 457.87 ?F), down to 50 milliKelvin (mK) and potentially 5 mK. It is smaller, faster and more convenient than conventional cryogenic thermometers for chip-scale devices and could be mass produced. NIST researchers describe the design and operation in a new journal paper.

Just 2.5 by 1.15 millimeters in size, the new thermometer can be embedded in or stuck to another cryogenic microwave device to measure its temperature when mounted on a chip. The researchers used the thermometer to demonstrate fast, accurate measurements of the heating of a superconducting microwave amplifier.

The technology is a spinoff of NIST’s custom superconducting

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