The findings may lead to more effective treatments of flu-like symptoms — ScienceDaily

The role of a protein in detecting the common cold virus and kickstarting an immune response to fight infection has been uncovered by a team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and the National University of Singapore.

In a study published in the journal Science on 22 October 2020, they showed that the protein NLRP1, found on the skin and in the airways, is a sensor that detects the human rhinovirus (HRV). When NLRP1 breaches the respiratory tract, it triggers an immune response leading to inflammation in the lungs and causes symptoms of the common cold.

HRV is a major cause of the common cold and acute respiratory disease in children and adults, which in severe cases, leads to bronchiolitis and pneumonia.

The research team said that discovering NLRP1’s purpose could lead to new treatments for the symptoms of

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Automotive Augmented Reality Market Demand, Revenue, Key Findings and Latest Technology, Forecast Research Report 2022

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

New York, United States, Mon, 30 Nov 2020 04:40:17 / Comserve Inc. / — Augmented reality displays are a more intuitive and safer way to use navigation, access information, make calls, and listen to music without moving the eyes away from the road.

Augmented reality displays are a more intuitive and safer way to use navigation, access information, make calls, and listen to music without moving the eyes away from the road. All the information can be displayed on the windshield, a projector screen to decrease the driver’s distraction and offer safety and convenience.

Download Sample of This Strategic Report:https://www.kennethresearch.com/sample-request-10065129

Market Dynamics
The key drivers of this technology is that there is no need for the driver to look at the GPS box or dashboard because the GPS navigation system is displayed right on the windshield and

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SaaS Security Industry Market Revenue, Key Findings and Latest Technology, Forecast Research Report 2027

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

New York, United States, Sun, 29 Nov 2020 03:43:06 / Comserve Inc. / — The report covers the forecast and analysis of the SaaS Security Industry market on a global and regional level.

The report covers the forecast and analysis of the SaaS Security Industry market on a global and regional level. The study provides historical data from 2013 to 2018 along with a forecast from 2019 to 2027 based on revenue (USD Million). The study includes drivers and restraints of the SaaS Security Industry market along with the impact they have on the demand over the forecast period. Additionally, the report includes the study of opportunities available in the SaaS Security Industry market on a global level.

In order to give the users of this report a comprehensive view of the SaaS Security Industry market, we

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Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Treatment Devices Market Revenue, Key Findings, Latest Technology, Industry Expansion Strategies till 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

New York, United States, Sat, 28 Nov 2020 14:36:21 / Comserve Inc. / — The report covers a forecast and an analysis of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Treatment Devices market on a global and regional level.

The report covers a forecast and an analysis of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Treatment Devices market on a global and regional level. The study provides historical data for 2016, 2017, and 2018 along with a forecast from 2019 to 2025 based on volume (Kilotons) and revenue (USD Million). The study includes drivers and restraints of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Treatment Devices market along with the impact they have on the demand over the forecast time period. Additionally, the report includes the study of opportunities available in the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Treatment Devices on a global level.

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Findings could inform design of environmental technologies behind water purification processes and electric energy storage — ScienceDaily

A research team led by Northwestern University engineers and Argonne National Laboratory researchers have uncovered new findings into the role of ionic interaction within graphene and water. The insights could inform the design of new energy-efficient electrodes for batteries or provide the backbone ionic materials for neuromorphic computing applications.

Known for possessing extraordinary properties, from mechanical strength to electronic conductivity to wetting transparency, graphene plays an important role in many environmental and energy applications, such as water desalination, electrochemical energy storage, and energy harvesting. Water-mediated electrostatic interactions drive the chemical processes behind these technologies, making the ability to quantify the interactions between graphene, ions, and charged molecules vitally important in order to design more efficient and effective iterations.

“Every time you have interactions with ions in matter, the medium is very important. Water plays a vital role in mediating interactions between ions, molecules, and interfaces, which lead to a variety

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Phosphine Signals Actually Fainter As Scientists Re-Analyze Earlier Findings

KEY POINTS

  • A September study made the headlines for detecting phosphine on Venus
  • After reanalyzing the data, the researchers found that phosphine is actually much fainter on the planet
  • These recent findings have reignited the interest in exploring Venus

The scientists who made big waves in September for their study about the presence of possible markers of life on Venus have adjusted their findings, revealing much fainter traces of phosphine on the planet.

It was in September when a study made the headlines for its claim of detecting traces of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus, suggesting the possibility that there might be microbial life on the planet. Suddenly, the harsh planet that even rovers couldn’t stand for prolonged periods of time might be harboring life, and interest in the planet was reignited. Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin even said then that Venus was a “Russian planet.

Now,

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New family of quasiparticles in graphene-based materials: Findings to help achieve Holy Grail of 2D materials – superfast electronic devices –

A group of researchers led by Sir Andre Geim and Dr Alexey Berdyugin at The University of Manchester have discovered and characterised a new family of quasiparticles named ‘Brown-Zak fermions’ in graphene-based superlattices.

The team achieved this breakthrough by aligning the atomic lattice of a graphene layer to that of an insulating boron nitride sheet, dramatically changing the properties of the graphene sheet.

The study follows years of successive advances in graphene-boron nitride superlattices which allowed the observation of a fractal pattern known as the Hofstadter’s butterfly — and today (Friday, November 13) the researchers report another highly surprising behaviour of particles in such structures under applied magnetic field.

“It is well known, that in zero magnetic field, electrons move in straight trajectories and if you apply a magnetic field they start to bend and move in circles,” explain Julien Barrier and Dr Piranavan Kumaravadivel, who carried out the experimental

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Findings suggest that Isaac Newton’s 17th-century masterpiece was more widely read — ScienceDaily

In a story of lost and stolen books and scrupulous detective work across continents, a Caltech historian and his former student have unearthed previously uncounted copies of Isaac Newton’s groundbreaking science book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, known more colloquially as the Principia. The new census more than doubles the number of known copies of the famous first edition, published in 1687. The last census of this kind, published in 1953, had identified 187 copies, while the new Caltech survey finds 386 copies. Up to 200 additional copies, according to the study authors, likely still exist undocumented in public and private collections.

“We felt like Sherlock Holmes,” says Mordechai (Moti) Feingold, the Kate Van Nuys Page Professor of the History of Science and the Humanities at Caltech, who explains that he and his former student, Andrej Svoren?ík (MS ’08) of the University of Mannheim in Germany, spent more than a

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New findings could provide a tool for people with bipolar disorder and clinicians to predict relapse and intervene in a timely manner — ScienceDaily

Relapse in people with bipolar disorder can be predicted accurately by their tendency towards having pessimistic beliefs, according to a study published today in eLife.

The results could provide an urgently needed tool for doctors to predict upcoming relapse and provide timely treatment.

Bipolar disorder is characterised by successive periods of elation (mania) and depression, interspersed with asymptomatic phases, called euthymia. People who have shorter periods of asymptomatic euthymia are more likely to suffer disability, unemployment, hospitalisation and increased suicidal feelings. However, predicting relapses using existing clinical diagnostic tools or demographic information has proven largely ineffective in bipolar disorder.

“It is already known that people with depression tend to give negative information more weight than positive information, leading to pessimistic views that may make symptoms worse,” explains lead author Paolo Ossola, Research Fellow at the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Italy. “We wanted to test the

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New findings for viral research on bicycle crashes at railroad crossings — ScienceDaily

New research by Professor Chris Cherry follows his previous research that drew worldwide attention to the frequency of bicycle crashes at a railway crossing near his UT office.

His new work, “A jughandle design will virtually eliminate single bicycle crashes at a railway crossing,” was published in the Journal of Transport & Health and provides a unique opportunity to assess the before and after safety performance of fixing a skewed rail crossing for single bicycle crashes.

A jughandle design realigns the bicycle approach to about 60 degrees, virtually eliminating the risk of a rider’s tire being caught in the gap between the rail and the pavement, a cause of serious crashes. This significant finding varies from previous design recommendations of a 90-degree approach.

The initial study conducted in 2017 evaluated video data, shown below, that was collected for two months, capturing 13,247 cyclists crossing two sections of the railway along

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