Seattle startup Flexe raises $70M as e-commerce rise fuels demand for flexible warehousing platform

The Flexe team, pre-pandemic. (Flexe Photo)

Flexe is raising more capital ahead of schedule as the pandemic-driven e-commerce boom spurs faster-than-expected growth for its warehousing technology platform.

The Seattle startup announced a $70 million Series C round led by new investor T. Rowe Price, with participation from existing backers Activate Capital, Tiger Global, Madrona Venture Group, Redpoint Ventures, Prologis Ventures, and others. Total funding to date in the 6-year-old company is $134 million.

Flexe originally planned to raise another round sometime next year. But investors were ready to put more fuel into the business given its recent metrics.

“Flexe is poised to become an impactful company in the logistics industry for the long term,” Andrew Davis, director of private investments at T. Rowe Price, said in a statement. T. Rowe Price recently led a $2.5 billion round in electric car maker Rivian and was an early backer of Facebook, Twitter,

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Here’s why businesses should embrace flexible pay options

By Joe Korngiebel, executive vice president, chief product and technology officer, Ceridian

Even before the onset of COVID-19, the average American was living paycheck-to-paycheck. Today, approximately 51 million additional Americans have filed for unemployment since the start of the pandemic. According to a recent Ceridian survey of those Americans still employed, one-third said an unexpected expense of $500 would make them unable to meet their financial obligations. The numbers make it impossible to ignore the fact that people are financially stressed.

Beneath all of this lies a systemic issue that attracts fewer headlines than workforce financial topics, like minimum wage, but is equally important: how and when people receive their earned wages. Most employers currently pay their employees in arrears on a bi-weekly or semi-monthly, or even monthly basis. This means that employers retain earned wages, and employees are effectively providing interest-free financing to their employers.

This long-standing practice places

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Flexible Plastic Packaging Market 2020-2024 | Key Vendors, Trends, and Drivers

Shape strategic responses through the phases of industry recovery

Amcor Plc, Berry Global Group Inc., and CCL Industries Inc. will emerge as major flexible plastic packaging market participants during 2020-2024

The flexible plastic packaging market is expected to grow by USD 34.02 billion during 2020-2024, according to Technavio. The report offers a detailed analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the flexible plastic packaging market in optimistic, probable, and pessimistic forecast scenarios.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201110005869/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Flexible Plastic Packaging Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Enterprises will go through Response, Recovery, and Renew phases. Download a Free Sample Report on COVID-19

The flexible plastic packaging market will witness a positive impact during the forecast period owing to the widespread growth of the COVID-19 pandemic. As per Technavio’s pandemic-focused market research, market growth

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Somehow This Flexible Camera Strap Turns Into a Rigid Camera Support at the Flip of a Switch

After buying a nice camera, it doesn’t take long to amass a mountain of “necessary” accessories to help you get the perfect shot. The Conda Strap is a clever alternative to a heavy backpack full of photography gear, instantly turning a flexible neck strap into a rigid camera support.

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A good photographer doesn’t need a bag full of lenses, filters, flashes, or strobes to take good photos, but when you’re spending thousands of dollars on a camera, a neck strap is a highly recommended accessory. It not only makes it easier to carry a camera around all day, it’s also cheap insurance against your shooter taking a catastrophic tumble. Frii Designs, a company known for a clever rotating belt clip that keeps three alternate lenses in easy reach, has revealed its next innovative camera accessory that promises to support your camera whether it’s worn around your neck or

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Large-area flexible organic photodiodes can compete with silicon devices — ScienceDaily

The performance of flexible large-area organic photodiodes has advanced to the point that they can now offer advantages over conventional silicon photodiode technology, particularly for applications such as biomedical imaging and biometric monitoring that require detecting low levels of light across large areas.

The low-noise, solution-processed, flexible organic devices offer the ability to use arbitrarily shaped, large-area photodiodes to replace complex arrays that would be required with conventional silicon photodiodes, which can be expensive to scale up for large-area applications. The organic devices provide performance comparable to that of rigid silicon photodiodes in the visible light spectrum — except in response time.

“What we have achieved is the first demonstration that these devices, produced from solution at low temperatures, can detect as little as a few hundred thousand photons of visible light every second, similar to the magnitude of light reaching our eye from a single star in a dark

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Juggle secures $2.1M to expand its ‘flexible work’ SaaS marketplace for senior execs

As we’ve seen, some startups are pivoting to re-model themselves for the radically different world of the COVID-19 pandemic. But others literally turned out to have a business model which, although they could never have realized it at the time, might have been (almost) tailored-made for this era.

A fascinating example of this is SaaS marketplace Juggle. Originally designed as a marketplace to allow executive-level women to re-enter the world of work in a flexible manner after having a family, it later expanded into a wider market for anyone wanting to work flexibly and for employers who need that kind of workforce. But now, with the world of work totally upended by the pandemic, ‘flexibility’ is literally now the name of the game.

It’s now disclosed its funding of $2.1 million from investors in the UK and the US. Investors include a number of the UK’s leading angels, and also

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Researchers invent flexible and highly reliable sensor — ScienceDaily

Real-time health monitoring and sensing abilities of robots require soft electronics, but a challenge of using such materials lie in their reliability. Unlike rigid devices, being elastic and pliable makes their performance less repeatable. The variation in reliability is known as hysteresis.

Guided by the theory of contact mechanics, a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) came up with a new sensor material that has significantly less hysteresis. This ability enables more accurate wearable health technology and robotic sensing.

The research team, led by Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee from the Institute for Health Innovation & Technology at NUS, published their results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on 28 September 2020.

High sensitivity, low hysteresis pressure sensor

When soft materials are used as compressive sensors, they usually face severe hysteresis issues. The soft sensor’s material properties can change in between repeated touches,

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NUS researchers invent flexible and highly reliable sensor

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IMAGE: Flexible TRACE sensor patches can be placed on the skin to measure blood flow in superficial arteries.
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Credit: National University of Singapore

Real-time health monitoring and sensing abilities of robots require soft electronics, but a challenge of using such materials lie in their reliability. Unlike rigid devices, being elastic and pliable makes their performance less repeatable. The variation in reliability is known as hysteresis.

Guided by the theory of contact mechanics, a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) came up with a new sensor material that has significantly less hysteresis. This ability enables more accurate wearable health technology and robotic sensing.

The research team, led by Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee from the Institute for Health Innovation & Technology at NUS, published their results in the prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on 28 September 2020.

High sensitivity, low hysteresis pressure

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Powering the future: new insights into how alkali-metal doped flexible solar cells work

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IMAGE: Flexible thin-film solar cells constructed via doping with eco-friendly, earth-abundant, and inexpensive alkali metals could be the future of a sustainable energy economy.
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Credit: Pixabay on Pexels

“When eco-friendly, inexpensive, versatile, and efficient solar cells are developed, all thermal and nuclear power plants will disappear, and solar cells installed over the ocean or in outer space will power our world,” says Professor Dong-Seon Lee of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea. His highly optimistic view of the future mirrors the visions of many researchers involved in the effort to improve solar cells.

Over time, in this effort, scientists have come to realize that doping–distorting a crystal structure by introducing an impurity–polycrystalline solar cells made by melting together crystals called CZTSSe with earth-abundant and eco-friendly alkali metals, such as sodium and potassium, can improve their light to electricity conversion efficiency while also leading to the

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A flexible color-changing film inspired by chameleon skin — ScienceDaily

Chameleons can famously change their colors to camouflage themselves, communicate and regulate their temperature. Scientists have tried to replicate these color-changing properties for stealth technologies, anti-counterfeiting measures and electronic displays, but the materials have limitations. Now, researchers have developed a flexible film that changes color in response to stretching, pressure or humidity. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

By tensing or relaxing their skin, chameleons can change the way light reflects from guanine crystals under the surface, producing what’s known as structural coloration. These structural colors are different from the pigments that give many other creatures their hues. Scientists have mimicked the crystalline nanostructures of chameleon skin in various color-changing materials, but they’re typically difficult to produce, or they rely on non-renewable petroleum resources. In contrast, cellulose nanocrystals are a renewable material that can self-assemble into a film with iridescent structural colors. However, the films

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