Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected — ScienceDaily

Decarbonizing U.S. electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels. A generator-level model described in the December 4 issue of the journal Science suggests that most fossil fuel power plants could complete normal lifespans and still close by 2035 because so many facilities are nearing the end of their operational lives.

Meeting a 2035 deadline for decarbonizing U.S. electricity production, as proposed by the incoming U.S. presidential administration, would eliminate just 15% of the capacity-years left in plants powered by fossil fuels, says the article by Emily Grubert, a Georgia Institute of Technology researcher. Plant retirements are already underway, with 126 gigawatts of fossil generator capacity taken out of production between 2009 and 2018, including 33 gigawatts in 2017 and 2018 alone.

“Creating an electricity system that does not contribute to climate change is actually two processes —

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Fossil Reveals ‘Buck-toothed Toucan’ That Lived With Dinosaurs

The discovery of a creature described as resembling a “buck-toothed toucan” that lived some 68 million years ago has upended assumptions about diversity in the birds that lived alongside dinosaurs.

At less than nine centimetres (3.5 inches) long, the delicate skull of the bird scientists have dubbed Falcatakely forsterae might be easily overlooked.

In fact, it almost was, sitting in a backlog of excavated fossils for years before CT scanning suggested the specimen deserved more attention.

It turns out that its tall, scythe-like beak, while resembling the toucan, is something never before seen in the fossil record.

Birds in the Mesozoic era — between 250 million and 65 million years ago — had “relatively unspecialised snouts”, Patrick O’Connor, lead author of a study on the new creature, told AFP.

“Falcatakely just changed the game completely, documenting a long, high beak unlike anything known in the Mesozoic,” added O’Connor, professor of

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One-of-a-kind fossil shows T. rex and Triceratops locked in battle to the death

When you imagine dinosaurs battling it out, the first match-up that comes to mind is Triceratops vs. T. rex. In our collective imagination they are fighting eternally. It’s the clash of the titans. But did these battles actually take place?



a herd of cattle walking across a river: Artist Anthony Hutchings' rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences


© Provided by CNET
Artist Anthony Hutchings’ rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

Yes. Yes they did. We have the fossil to prove it, and for the first time ever, the public will be able to take a look.

The fossil — nicknamed “Dueling Dinosaurs” — was initially discovered in 2006, but until now has only been seen by a select few. It shows a T. rex and a Triceratops in mid-battle, literally fighting to the death. The pair are preserved in a fossil going on display for the first time at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, The

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Methane Hits Record High in Atmosphere as Fossil Fuel Companies Diverge

More than 60 oil and gas companies committed to a new framework today to report methane emissions as the United Nations reported that atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas reached a record high.

The plan from the Climate & Clean Air Coalition’s Oil and Gas Methane Partnership (OGMP) tasks companies with reporting methane emissions from both their core operations as well as joint ventures. As a part of the voluntary framework, companies will share their own methane reduction targets with OGMP, an initiative managed by the U.N. Environment Programme.

The plan revamps an existing OGMP framework and calls on companies to outline how they will realize their objectives to cut methane emissions. The 62 companies that have joined OGMP represent an estimated 30% of global oil and gas production, according to the partnership. The group said it seeks to deliver a 45% reduction in the oil and gas industry’s methane

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Incredible fossil shows T. rex and Triceratops locked in battle to the death

When you imagine dinosaurs battling it out, the first match-up that comes to mind is Triceratops vs. T. rex. In our collective imagination they are fighting eternally. It’s the clash of the titans. But did these battles actually take place?



a herd of cattle walking across a river: Artist Anthony Hutchings' rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences


© Provided by CNET
Artist Anthony Hutchings’ rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

Yes. Yes they did. We have the fossil to prove it and for the first time ever, the public will be able to take a look.

The fossil — nicknamed “Dueling Dinosaurs” — was initially discovered in 2006, but until now has only been seen by a select few. It shows a T. rex and a Triceratops in mid-battle, literally fighting to the death. The pair are preserved in a fossil going on display for the first time at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, The

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We’ve Found An Ancient ‘Fossil Galaxy’ Inside Our Milky Way, Say Scientists

Galaxies like ours are the result of many, many mergers. Exactly how galaxies form is a mystery, but we know these vast seas of stars often bump into each other and mix to form something new, and bigger.

Just last week scientists developed the first family tree of our home galaxy, but another paper published this week in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society claims to have discovered a hitherto unknown “fossil galaxy” hidden in the inner depths of our Milky Way.

It’s thought to have collided with the Milky Way about 10 billion years ago. The Milky Way is 13.5 billion years old, but this collision appears to have been responsible for adding

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Scientists spot signs of ‘fossil galaxy’ lurking in the heart of the Milky Way

This image shows the Milky Way seen from Earth. The reddish rings highlight where the stars of Heracles linger within our galaxy.


Danny Horta-Darrington (Liverpool John Moores University), ESA/Gaia, and the SDSS

Our very own Milky Way galaxy had a dramatic childhood. Astronomers have unveiled a new chapter in its memoir with the discovery of a likely “fossil galaxy” hidden near its heart.

The proposed fossil galaxy is named Heracles for the Greek hero. It probably tangled with the Milky Way around 10 billion years ago, back when our galaxy was a baby.

“Stars originally belonging to Heracles account for roughly one third of the mass of the entire Milky Way halo today — meaning that this newly-discovered ancient collision must have been a major event in the history of our galaxy,” the Sloan Digital

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‘Dueling Dinosaurs’ fossil, hidden from science for 14 years, could finally reveal its secrets

For more than a decade, paleontologists have speculated about a single fossil that preserves skeletons of two of the world’s most famous dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops. Not only are the bones arranged as they once were in life, but the dinosaurs are practically intertwined.

Each specimen is among the best of its kind ever found. Together, the pair—nicknamed the “Dueling Dinosaurs”—present a paleontological mystery: Did the beasts just happen to be entombed together by chance, perhaps as carcasses caught on the same river sandbar? Or had they been locked in mortal combat? Nobody has been able to study the fossil to find out.

The Dueling Dinosaurs fossil may represent a lethal struggle between a Triceratops and a juvenile T. rex, shown here in this artist’s reconstruction of prehistoric Montana.

Illustration by Anthony Hutchings

But that’s about to change. After years of legal battles that left the fossil locked

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Burning Fossil Fuels Helped Drive Earth’s Most Massive Extinction

Paleontologists call it the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, but it has another name: “the Great Dying.” It happened about 252 million years ago, and, over the course of just tens of thousands of years, 96 percent of all life in the oceans and, perhaps, roughly 70 percent of all land life vanished forever.

The smoking gun was ancient volcanism in what is today Siberia, where volcanoes disgorged enough magma and lava over about a million years to cover an amount of land equivalent to a third or even half of the surface area of the United States.

But volcanism on its own didn’t cause the extinction. The Great Dying was fueled, two separate teams of scientists report in two recent papers, by extensive oil and coal deposits that the Siberian magma blazed through, leading to combustion that released greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane.

“There was lots of oil, coal

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‘Dueling Dinosaurs’ fossil of T. rex, triceratops sold for $6 million

  • The “Dueling Dinosaurs” fossil is made up of intertwined T. rex and triceratops skeletons. 
  • The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences bought it for $6 million and will display the fossils starting in 2022.
  • Researchers there will examine the bones in detail and investigate whether the dinosaurs actually died in a duel. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A 67-million-year-old fossil pair known as “Dueling Dinosaurs” consists of a remarkably preserved T. rex alongside the bones of an equally intact Triceratops.

For years, the skeletons languished in labs and warehouses as ranchers and paleontologists fought a legal battle over their ownership. On Tuesday, that fight ended: The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences bought the dinosaurs for $6 million, according to the Charlotte Observer. The 30,000-pound fossils will soon arrive at the museum, which plans to begin work on a new Dueling Dinosaurs exhibit in May. 

The display, slated

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