Seattle startup Flexe raises $70M as e-commerce rise fuels demand for flexible warehousing platform

The Flexe team, pre-pandemic. (Flexe Photo)

Flexe is raising more capital ahead of schedule as the pandemic-driven e-commerce boom spurs faster-than-expected growth for its warehousing technology platform.

The Seattle startup announced a $70 million Series C round led by new investor T. Rowe Price, with participation from existing backers Activate Capital, Tiger Global, Madrona Venture Group, Redpoint Ventures, Prologis Ventures, and others. Total funding to date in the 6-year-old company is $134 million.

Flexe originally planned to raise another round sometime next year. But investors were ready to put more fuel into the business given its recent metrics.

“Flexe is poised to become an impactful company in the logistics industry for the long term,” Andrew Davis, director of private investments at T. Rowe Price, said in a statement. T. Rowe Price recently led a $2.5 billion round in electric car maker Rivian and was an early backer of Facebook, Twitter,

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Global Fingerprint Sensors Market Report 2020: Innovation That Fuels New Deal Flow and Growth Pipelines

Dublin, Nov. 19, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Global Fingerprint Sensors Market, 2020” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The global fingerprint sensors market is competitive and growing quickly. In a field of about 60 global industry participants, the report plotted the top 12 companies.

The selected market participants exhibit expertise in different fingerprint sensor technologies, such as optical, thermal, capacitive, and ultrasonic. The top sensor manufacturers have introduced sensors that are increasingly thin, lightweight, and flexible for integration into various devices and for high-quality image capture.

Globally, biometric fingerprint technology is experiencing increased adoption across industries. Integration of fingerprint sensors in smartphones, tablets, and other Internet of Things (IoT) devices is spurring exponential market growth. Enhanced security, ease of use, and advanced capabilities are making fingerprint sensors popular additions to consumer electronics and subsequently causing a convergence of applications across industries. For example, mobile devices with embedded fingerprint

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Burning Fossil Fuels Helped Drive Earth’s Most Massive Extinction

Paleontologists call it the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, but it has another name: “the Great Dying.” It happened about 252 million years ago, and, over the course of just tens of thousands of years, 96 percent of all life in the oceans and, perhaps, roughly 70 percent of all land life vanished forever.

The smoking gun was ancient volcanism in what is today Siberia, where volcanoes disgorged enough magma and lava over about a million years to cover an amount of land equivalent to a third or even half of the surface area of the United States.

But volcanism on its own didn’t cause the extinction. The Great Dying was fueled, two separate teams of scientists report in two recent papers, by extensive oil and coal deposits that the Siberian magma blazed through, leading to combustion that released greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane.

“There was lots of oil, coal

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Analysis: Battered value bulls wary as vaccine news fuels cheap stock surge

By Lewis Krauskopf

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A long period of underperformance for value stocks has frustrated Mike Mullaney, whose firm’s investing style is “all value, all the time.”

One low point came when Mullaney noticed competing funds in the value space buying up big technology and other momentum stocks – regarded as the antithesis of value – to juice their performance.

“To say it’s been a tough slog is an understatement,” said Mullaney, director of global markets research at Boston Partners, which manages over $60 billion.

Long-suffering value specialists received some vindication this week after Pfizer’s breakthrough in developing a COVID-19 vaccine ignited a rally in shares of energy firms, banks, industrials and other members of the value universe – commonly defined as stocks that trade at discounts to their projected intrinsic worth.

As of Thursday’s close, the Russell 1000 value index <.RLV> was on track to outperform its

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Amazon expands in Brazil as Covid-19 fuels e-commerce surge

Amazon.com delivery trucks in Richmond, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020.

David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Amazon said on Monday it had opened three more logistics centers in Brazil to take advantage of the boost the Covid-19 pandemic has given to e-commerce in South America’s largest economy.

The new units are already operating in the states of Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul and the capital city of Brasilia.

They increase the number of Amazon logistics centers in Brazil to eight, expanding its reach to all corners of the vast country.

The expansion, which adds 75,000 square meters (807,000 square feet) of distribution space, is Amazon’s biggest since it began operating in Brazil in 2012. It will create 1,500 direct jobs, the company said in a statement.

Alex Szapiro, Amazon’s chief executive in Brazil, said the new centers will allow the company to immediately raise

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Big Tech Companies Reap Gains as Covid-19 Fuels Shift in Demand

Tech giants including Amazon.com Inc. and Google reported strong quarterly sales and profits that showed how pandemic-era demand for their digital services and gadgets is driving them to new heights even in the midst of a debate about their market power.

The financial results announced Thursday, which also included record revenue at Facebook Inc., illustrated again how increased remote working and living has elevated use of everything from online retail and social media to cloud-computing services and digital advertising—accelerating shifts in consumer and business behavior that are expected to continue beyond the Covid-19 pandemic.

Amazon, which had delivered record sales in the second quarter of the year, topped that level in the three months through September, with revenue soaring 37% to a record $96.2 billion. Profit nearly tripled to $6.3 billion, propelled by strong online sales as well as digital advertising and growth in its lucrative cloud-computing arm.

“We’re seeing

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Microsoft, World’s Third-Largest Tech Firm, Posts $14 Billion Profit, Shattering Expectations As Pandemic Fuels Cloud Sales

Topline

Two days before a slew of big tech firms are slated to report earnings, Microsoft–the world’s third-largest technology company by market cap–posted quarterly results Tuesday after the market close that shattered Wall Street expectations thanks to a surge in sales of its cloud services–a sign that the pandemic continues to be a boon for tech, while other industries continue to struggle.

Key Facts

Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft reported revenue of $37.2 billion in its first fiscal quarter, up 12% year over year and even more than the $35.7 billion analysts were forecasting.

Net income, meanwhile, soared 30% from last year, hitting $13.9 billion, or $1.82 per share–well above average analyst expectations of $1.54 per share. 

Microsoft

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Coronavirus Pandemic Fuels Global Decline in Internet Freedom | Best Countries

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic that has forced lockdowns and limited access to workspaces, schools and public venues, internet access is more important than ever before. But according to a recent report from Freedom House, not all access is equal around the world, and it’s trending downward.

Globally, internet freedom saw its 10th consecutive year of decline, according to the annual report, which evaluated internet freedom in 65 countries. While 23 countries registered net gains in internet freedom, 26 countries saw worse scores than last year.

“The coronavirus pandemic is accelerating a dramatic decline in global internet freedom,” according to the authors of the report. “For the 10th consecutive year, users have experienced an overall deterioration in their rights, and the phenomenon is contributing to a broader crisis for democracy worldwide.”

Iceland maintained the highest score in internet freedom, while the United States ranked seventh, Estonia, Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom

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The future of energy is about technology, not fossil fuels [Opinion]

Oil forecasters have had the same long-term challenge for decades: figuring out how much of the world’s liquid hydrocarbons will be in demand years into the future, and where, and in what mix of products and uses. And for decades, the long-term view has been pretty much consistent: in aggregate, global demand increases as the economy and population grow. Near-term lines are jagged (current oil demand is more than ten million barrels per day lower than it was a year ago, thanks to Covid-19); long-term lines are smooth and moving up.



a windmill on top of a grass covered field: Wind turbines and oil pumpjack in action Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015, north of Stanton, Texas.


© James Durbin / James Durbin

Wind turbines and oil pumpjack in action Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015, north of Stanton, Texas.


There’s something different though in the two most recent long-term forecasts, from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and the International Energy Agency. Those lines, eventually, stop going up. Demand comes very, very close to peaking, even in

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The Future of Energy is About Technology, Not Fossil Fuels

(Bloomberg) — Oil forecasters have had the same long-term challenge for decades: figuring out how much of the world’s liquid hydrocarbons will be in demand years into the future, and where, and in what mix of products and uses. And for decades, the long-term view has been pretty much consistent: in aggregate, global demand increases as the economy and population grow. Near-term lines are jagged (current oil demand is more than ten million barrels per day lower than it was a year ago, thanks to Covid-19); long-term lines are smooth and moving up.

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There’s something different though in the two most recent long-term forecasts, from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and the International Energy Agency. Those lines, eventually, stop going up. Demand comes very, very close to peaking, even in the most conservative (and for oil, most bullish) scenarios. OPEC and the IEA see demand continuing to

Read More