DNA Technology Could Help Investigators In Prince George’s County Reopen Cold Cases : NPR

Prince George’s County will reopen cold cases with the help of DNA technology.

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A $470,000 grant to use new DNA technology could be the answer to solving cold cases in Prince George’s County.

The county was one of 10 in the nation to receive the three-year-long grant from the Department of Justice. The grant will allow the county to reopen cases, some going as far back as 1979, using forensic genetic genealogy — an investigative tool comparing and analyzing DNA samples from crime scenes and popular genealogy websites like 23andMe and Family Tree. The county’s State’s Attorney Aisha Braveboy’s office was the recipient of the grant.

“This is a process that holds great promise for achieving justice and bringing closure for victims of cold case crimes and their loved ones,” Braveboy said in a statement. “It’s important for the community

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Prince George’s will use DNA registries to solve cold cases through new DOJ grant

Prince George’s County is one of 10 jurisdictions across the country that will receive a $470,000 grant from the Justice Department to reopen cold cases using forensic genetic genealogy — a new investigative technique that draws on privately curated DNA databases from popular genealogy websites to compare with samples collected from crimes.

The funding could help investigators reopen as many as 60 cold cases over the next three years, Prince George’s prosecutors and police said at a news conference Thursday.

“This is just another area where we’re going to make a big difference in Prince George’s County,” county State’s Attorney Aisha Braveboy said.

There are more than 600 cases of serious and violent crimes in the county in which DNA was collected from the scene but the sample did not generate a match in the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System, often referred to as CODIS.

The leads ran out,

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