New heart pump technology helps aid recovery in heart attack patients



a man and woman riding on the back of a bicycle: John Hays (left), with his wife, Gwen, suffered a heart attack Aug. 25 and underwent surgery six days later. Doctors performed the procedure with the new Impella 5.5 technology, which enables heart recovery in patients whose hearts are too weak to effectively pump blood.


© [Courtesy of Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center]
John Hays (left), with his wife, Gwen, suffered a heart attack Aug. 25 and underwent surgery six days later. Doctors performed the procedure with the new Impella 5.5 technology, which enables heart recovery in patients whose hearts are too weak to effectively pump blood.

PALM BEACH GARDENS – John Hays had his first heart attack at age 35.

He had his second three decades later while mountain biking in Dyer Park.

A former triathlete and grandfather of two, the 65-year-old North Palm Beach resident went home before being transported to nearby Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, where doctors saved his life by using cutting-edge technology called an Impella 5.5 with SmartAssist heart pump.

More: Q&A: Palm Beach Gardens doctor reveals what he’s learned in six months of COVID-19 care

The device, which is temporarily implanted in a patient’s heart during surgery,

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Designer’s past in video games helps shape technology in new Ford F-150

Mark Sich took everything he learned as a video game designer and put it into the 2021 Ford F-150.

Ford reveals the 2021 F-150 pickup truck and it is full of innovation

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Essential to making the all-new pickup a success is easy-to-use technology.

“We realized that the truck customer is not a technophile,” he said. “They’re not interested in technology for technology’s sake.”

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This is a man who has bachelor’s degrees in physics, architecture and civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, plus a master’s degree in science, design and computation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Not an underachiever.



a car parked in a parking lot: Mark Sich, design manager of the 2021 Ford F-150, is standing next to the King Ranch in September 2020.


© Ford Motor Co.
Mark Sich, design manager of the 2021 Ford F-150, is standing next to the King Ranch in September 2020.

Sich, 51, of Romeo is responsible for 23

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New technology helps aid heart recovery in heart attack patients


John Hays of North Palm Beach benefited from the cutting-edge technology.

Jodie Wagner
 
| Palm Beach Post

PALM BEACH GARDENS – John Hays had his first heart attack at age 35.

He had his second three decades later while mountain biking in Dyer Park.

A former triathlete and grandfather of two, the 65-year-old North Palm Beach resident was able to get home before being transported to nearby Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, where doctors saved his life by using cutting-edge technology called an Impella 5.5 with SmartAssist heart pump.

More: Q&A: Palm Beach Gardens doctor reveals what he’s learned in six months of COVID-19 care

The device, which is temporarily implanted in a patient’s heart during surgery, enables heart recovery in patients whose hearts are too weak to effectively pump blood on their own after a heart attack.

It works by reducing the heart’s workload and oxygen demand, allowing it 

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This wildlife crossing helps mountain lions cross the 101 in LA

Reconnecting the open space on either side of the freeway is crucial for wildlife. “We know from science what’s going on there, and it’s a little deeper than just that the animals are getting hit by cars,” says Beth Pratt of the National Wildlife Federation, one of several partner organizations working on the project. “They are becoming genetically isolated, because animals cannot move into the small islands of habitat that are created by our freeways.” The situation is most acute for mountain lions, who risk extinction in the area within decades, but other wildlife, from lizards to birds, are also showing a decline in genetic diversity.

Fires fueled by climate change are making the challenges worse, as animals often can’t relocate when their habitat is destroyed, or they can’t directly flee the flames. A mountain lion named P-64, who died because of the Woolsey Fire, is one example. “That cat

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California County Smartphone App Helps With Waste Management

(TNS) — A new smartphone app is available to help Merced County, Calif., residents manage their household waste.

The ‘Merced Recycles’ app, launched by the Merced County Regional Waste Management Authority, allows users to view trash pick-up schedules and information on what bins items should be placed in.

Customers can generate a local trash pick-up schedule by inputting their home address, with an option to send personalized reminders to place bins at the curbside, according to a Merced County Association of Governments news release.

The app also includes an interactive feature called the ‘Waste Wizard’ which teaches users what items can be recycled, composted or placed in the trash.

Customers can type in an item on the Waste Wizard search engine and receive instructions, such as which color cart to place the item in as well as tips to ensure of proper disposal.

The app can also provide the

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VCs say big tech often helps startups, challenging House lawmakers

  • When House lawmakers released a 449-report earlier this month calling for new antitrust legislation against big tech companies, it lambasted Google, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook for contributing to an innovation “kill zone” that it said hurts startups. 
  • But a growing number of VCs and industry leaders are challenging such claims, calling them misleading.
  • VCs say that practices like acquisitions, which the report wants to make more difficult for large tech companies to do, actually benefits startups. 
  • They also point to data showing that the rise in venture capital funding in recent years has accompanied the rise of big tech.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Buried in the sprawling, 449-page Congressional report spearheaded by House Democrats about regulating big tech is a recommendation that is making the venture capital world very nervous. 

To make it harder for big tech companies to snuff out young, upstart competitors by buying them,

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