Cesarean section-born children may face higher risk of infection-related hospitalization — ScienceDaily

Children born via cesarean section may be more likely to be hospitalized for infection during early childhood. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Jessica Miller at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Australia and colleagues suggests that compared to vaginally-born children, cesarean-born children may have a higher risk of infection-related hospitalization for up to five years of age.

The global proportion of cesarean section births has nearly doubled since 2000, yet the relationship between mode of birth and common childhood infections beyond the neonatal period is not well understood. To assess the association between mode of birth and infection-related hospitalization, researchers analyzed hospital data of 7,174,787 singleton children in Denmark, Scotland, England, and Australia born between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2015. Children born during this period were followed from their birth-related hospital discharge date until an infection-related hospitalization, death, emigration, 5th birthday, or end of the study period.

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Higher death, hospitalization rates compared to non-white Hispanic individuals, variable by race — ScienceDaily

Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) demonstrate the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Hispanic groups within the US, with the most severe outcomes, including death and intensive care, among Hispanic Black individuals. Analyzing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found differences between Hispanic groups, with higher rates of hospitalization and increased risk of death for Hispanic Black compared to Hispanic multiracial individuals. Published online in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, the results highlight that Hispanic populations as a whole have worse COVID-19 outcomes compared to the Hispanic white population, demonstrating the need for more accurate demographic data collection efforts in order to better address the disparities among Hispanic individuals impacted by COVID-19.

Results from previous COVID-19 research have shown that Latinx populations, as a whole, have worse outcomes compared to other ethnic groups. This study, the first to

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