Hubble telescope witnesses ‘very weird’ fast fade of Stingray nebula

Hubble’s observations of the Stingray nebula in 1996 and 2016 show the dramatic changes in the glowing gases. 


NASA, ESA, B. Balick (University of Washington), M. Guerrero (Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía), and G. Ramos-Larios (Universidad de Guadalajara)

In a universe where processes are often measured in millions and billions of years, the Hubble Space Telescope witnessed something extraordinary over the course of just two decades. The Stringray nebula went from bright in 1996 to faded in 2016, as if it had been left hanging on a cosmic drying line.

Stingray, more formally known as Hen 3-1357, was hailed as the youngest known planetary nebula when it was first noticed. The nebula formed during the star’s end of life when it ejected glowing gases that gave it a marine-animal-like shape. 

What’s so wild about the

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NASA’s Hubble Spots Galaxy Being Stripped Of Dark Matter

Dark matter theory has long been sacrosanct in mainstream astronomical circles. Rarely do astronomers contradict the tenet that some 85 percent of all matter in the cosmos is dominated by unseen matter that only weakly interacts with gravity.   

Thus, it came as a surprise that doubt was cast on its existence by recent Hubble Space Telescope observations of two massive galaxies that appeared to be altogether devoid of this exotic matter. 

But in a paper submitted to The Astrophysical Journal, an international team of scientists detail observations on NGC 1052-DF4, the second galaxy purported to harbor little or no such dark matter.

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NASA Hubble Snaps ‘Cosmic Cinnamon Bun’ In Andromeda Constellation [Photo]

KEY POINTS

  • NASA shared an image of a cinnamon bun-shaped galaxy snapped by the Hubble telescope
  • UGC 12588 is located 31 million light-years away in the constellation of Andromeda
  • It is considered a spiral galaxy despite its peculiar shape

NASA has shared a stunning new image of a galaxy resembling a “cosmic cinnamon bun” that lies in the constellation of Andromeda in the Northern Hemisphere.

A galaxy called UGC 12588 has a peculiar yet enticing shape in a photo snapped by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Astronomers revealed on the NASA website that unlike most spiral galaxies, UGC 12588 doesn’t have a line of stars across its center. Neither does it boast the classic prominent spiral arm pattern usually seen in other galaxies in this category.

UGC 12588 instead is composed of a white and mostly unstructured center, making it more reminiscent of a cinnamon bun than a megastructure composed

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NASA’s trusty Hubble just got a whole new job



a star filled sky: hubble star survey


© Provided by BGR
hubble star survey

  • The Hubble Space Telescope is about to embark on its most intense investigation ever.
  • NASA has tasked the space telescope with studying over 300 stars in our own galaxy and neighboring galaxies.
  • The survey will mainly focus on younger stars in the hopes of better understanding their evolution.

The Hubble Space Telescope has been with us for decades, and it’s done an incredible job of documenting some of the more interesting aspects of the cosmos. Now, despite its advancing age, the trusty telescope is being tasked with its largest observing program ever, according to NASA, as it will study over 300 stars using their ultraviolet light signatures.

The survey, which is called the “UV Legacy Library of Young Stars as Essential Standards,” or ULLYSES for short, will be aimed at building out the documentation and data on young stars in our own Milky

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Psyche, an asteroid believed to be worth $10,000 quadrillion, is observed through Hubble Telescope in new study

A rare metallic asteroid about three times farther away from the sun than our planet could yield secrets about Earth’s molten core, and scientists want to learn all about it.





© MaxarASU/P. Rubin/NASA/JPL-Caltech


A new study published Monday in The Planetary Science Journal takes a closer look at this mysterious asteroid, using data from the Hubble Telescope.

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Located between Mars and Jupiter, Asteroid 16 Psyche is one of the most massive objects in the asteroid belt in our solar system, and with a diameter of about 140 miles, it is roughly the same length as Massachusetts (if you exclude Cape Cod).

The exact composition of Psyche is still unclear, but scientists think it’s possible the asteroid is mostly made of iron and nickel. It’s been hypothesized that a piece of iron of its size could be worth about $10,000 quadrillion, more than the entire economy on our planet.

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New study uses Hubble Telescope to look at Psyche, a metal asteroid that could be worth $10,000 quadrillion

A rare metallic asteroid about three times farther away from the sun than our planet could yield secrets about Earth’s molten core, and scientists want to learn all about it.





© MaxarASU/P. Rubin/NASA/JPL-Caltech


A new study published Monday in The Planetary Science Journal takes a closer look at this mysterious asteroid, using data from the Hubble Telescope.

Loading...

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Located between Mars and Jupiter, Asteroid 16 Psyche is one of the most massive objects in the asteroid belt in our solar system, and with a diameter of about 140 miles, it is roughly the same length as Massachusetts (if you exclude Cape Cod).

The exact composition of Psyche is still unclear, but scientists think it’s possible the asteroid is mostly made of iron and nickel. It’s been hypothesized that a piece of iron of its size could be worth about $10,000 quadrillion, more than the entire economy on our planet.

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NASA Shares ‘Galactic Pumpkin’ Photo Captured By Hubble For Halloween

KEY POINTS

  • Hubble shared an image of two galaxies forming what astronomers dubbed the “Greater Pumpkin”
  • The image is a result of a collision between two galaxies, the NGC 2292 and NGC 2293
  • The galaxy pair is located 120 million light-years away from the Milky Way galaxy

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a “galactic pumpkin” just in time for this year’s Halloween. The Hubble captured an image of a pair of galaxies that looks like a Halloween decoration in space as they are in the early stages of a collision.

Described as the “Greater Pumpkin” by astronomers, the photo NASA shared on its Twitter and website shows what appears to be two eyes and a crooked smile inside a pumpkin-shaped head. The object emits a bright orange color, while the sector surrounding the “smile” is bluish.

The so-called “Greater Pumpkin” consists of two galaxies, identified as NGC 2292

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Hubble telescope gets Halloween-y with grinning ‘Greater Pumpkin’ galaxies

The Hubble Space Telescope caught two galaxies in the act of colliding. Their orange color earned them the nickname “Greater Pumpkin.”


NASA, ESA, and W. Keel (University of Alabama)

The It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown animated Peanuts special might not be on broadcast TV this year, but you can look to the cosmos for your giant pumpkin Halloween fix. The Hubble Space Telescope spied a pair of galaxies that could pass as a space jack-o’-lantern. 

Hubble — a joint project of NASA and the European Space Agency — snapped a spooky view of two galaxies colliding, and it reminded NASA of the Peanuts pumpkin, so it earned the nickname “Greater Pumpkin.” 

“‘Great’ is an understatement in this case because the galaxy pair spans 100,000 light-years,” NASA said in a statement on Thursday. “The ‘pumpkin’s’

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Hubble gets Halloween-y with grinning ‘Greater Pumpkin’ galaxies

The Hubble Space Telescope caught two galaxies in the act of colliding. Their orange color earned them the nickname “Greater Pumpkin.”


NASA, ESA, and W. Keel (University of Alabama)

The It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown animated Peanuts special might not be on broadcast TV this year, but you can instead look to the cosmos for your giant pumpkin fix for Halloween. The Hubble Space Telescope spied a pair of galaxies that could pass as a space jack-o’-lantern. 

Hubble — a joint project of NASA and the European Space Agency — snapped a spooky view of two galaxies colliding, and it reminded NASA of the Peanuts pumpkin, so it earned the nickname “Greater Pumpkin.” 

“‘Great’ is an understatement in this case because the galaxy pair spans 100,000 light-years,” NASA said in a statement on Thursday.

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