Intel unveils its second-generation quantum computing control chip

Intel unveiled its second-generation quantum computing control chip during its Intel Labs virtual event today. The chip, codenamed Horse Ridge II, is another milestone toward making quantum computing — one of the holy grails of computing — more practical. The new prototype builds on the first-generation Horse Ridge controller introduced in 2019. Horse Ridge II has more capability and higher levels of integration to control a quantum computer, which remains a long-term goal for the company.

At the outset of the project, Intel’s researchers designed the scalable system-on-chip (SOC) to operate at cryogenic temperatures, simplifying the control electronics and interconnects required to elegantly scale and operate large quantum computing systems. Most quantum computing systems only really works at near-freezing temperatures. Intel is trying to change that, but in the meantime, the control chip eliminates having to run hundreds of wires into a refrigerated case that houses the quantum computer.

Quantum

Read More

Intel and AMD to Add Secure Pluton Processor to Future CPUs

Microsoft said that it has developed a highly secure chip that Intel, AMD and Qualcomm plan to integrate in future central processing units used in laptops and other personal computers. 

Microsoft said the Pluton security processor would bring more advanced protection to PCs using its flagship Windows operating system. Designed by Microsoft, the chip would be used to lock up secret information, including passwords, in a secure vault in the CPU itself, instead of on a separate component on the PCB. Microsoft said the Pluton chip would help stymie all sorts of attacks on the hardware and prevent the theft of secret keys used in cryptography.

The company is partnering with Intel, AMD, and Qualcomm to add Pluton as part of a system on a chip, where all the components of the personal computer, including the CPU, are housed on the same die. It is unclear when the integrated Pluton

Read More

Intel upgrades quantum computer ambitions with new control chip

Intel's Horse Ridge 2 chip, packaged in this metal housing, is designed to simplify communications between a quantum processor and conventional computers.

Intel’s Horse Ridge 2 chip, packaged in this metal housing, is designed to simplify communications between a quantum processor and conventional computers.


Intel

Intel unveiled on Thursday its Horse Ridge 2 processor for controlling quantum computers, an important milestone in making the potentially revolutionary machines practical.

The Horse Ridge 2 isn’t a quantum processor itself but is designed to solve the challenges of communicating with future quantum processors with thousands or more qubits. The processor is the second generation of a family that debuted in 2019.

The processor comes as Intel endeavors to catch up with quantum computer rivals like IBM and Google. The chipmaker hopes it eventually will leapfrog the competition with processors housing vastly more qubits, the data processing element fundamental to quantum computers, than its competitors have. Horse Ridge 2

Read More

HP Omen Gaming PC With 5GHz 8-Core 11th Gen Intel Rocket Lake-S CPU Leaks Details

HP Omen Desktop
Intel has not been shy about in letting the world know it plans to update its desktop CPU lineup with its 11th Gen Core processors, codenamed Rocket Lake-S, sometime next year. It is some of the specifics that are currently kept in a Top Secret file within Intel’s labs, like specific CPU models and other details. If you are feeling impatient, however, a new entry at Geekbench sheds some light on one of the SKUs.
Before we get to that, let’s recap what we know for sure, straight from the horse’s mouth, so speak. Rocket Lake-S will feature Cypress Cove cores with up to 8 cores and 16 threads, and a memory controller supporting DDR4 speeds of up to 3200MHz. Intel also has let it be known that Rocket Lake-S will bring support for PCI Express 4.0 (up to 20 lanes), it will have new overclocking features and capabilities, and
Read More

Steam PC Gaming Hardware Survey Shows AMD Ryzen CPUs Continue To Take Share From Intel

AMD Ryzen

AMD versus Intel is sort of a David versus Goliath story, only these days, AMD has armed itself with more than just a slingshot. Zen is the real deal. That is abundantly clear by now, but lest anyone needs reminding, a peek at Steam’s latest hardware survey results for November 2020 show how well AMD’s processors are being received by gamers, as it continues to, uh, chip away at Intel’s share.

I can hear the groans at the pun, but bear with me. The point is, this is a different AMD versus Intel battle than in past years, before Zen came along. AMD for a long time was the also-ran, while Intel dominated the market with better performing CPUs at the high end. But now? The Ryzen 5000 series is an awesome lineup, while the previous generation Ryzen 3000 series still holds its own.

Combined with excellent platform support—X570 and

Read More

Nvidia, Intel, and AMD GPU shipments up 10.8% as consumers scoop up PCs

Demand is sky high for GPUs, according to industry intelligence firm Jon Peddie Research. In the company’s latest Market Watch report for calendar Q3 of 2020, it found that GPU shipments increased 10.8% year-over-year. AMD, Nvidia, and Intel all saw quarter-over-quarter increases as well.

As Jon Peddie notes in the breakdown of the report, GPU shipments are a leading indicator. Manufacturers purchase them before shipping PCs to consumers. This means that the market expects demand for PCs to remain high through the foreseeable future. The overall PC market increased 9.47% year-over-year, according to Jon Peddie.

Discrete GPUs from AMD and Nvidia were up 13.44% quarter-over-quarter. That jump is partially due to historical trends that lead to consumers purchasing more discrete GPUs in Q3 than Q2. But it also reflects the launch of Nvidia’s RTX 3000-series video cards in September. Those products flew off shelves and are still difficult to find.

Read More

Flash deals: save $250 on Apple’s Intel Core i7 Mac mini

There isn’t a better time to pick up an Intel Mac mini, with $250 knocked off two Core i7 models of the pint-sized Mac for 24 hours only ahead of the holidays.

Intel Mac mini deal

While the M1-equipped Mac mini is getting all of the attention, there are still good reasons to acquire the Intel-based models. At this early stage in the processor transition, sticking with Intel will ensure you will immediately be able to run the apps you want, without worrying if it will be affected by Rosetta 2 translation or won’t be ported over by the developer at all.

There’s also a few other benefits, such as being able to run Windows straight away, or having the option to run three monitors from the Mac mini, instead of just two on the M1 version (without the use of special adapters).

A promotion through

Read More

New Arm-based gaming PC set to take on Intel and AMD rigs

We’ve been expecting a PC based on the little-known quad-core Arm processor from the time it was launched in July this year. But surprisingly, instead of utilizing the low-power CPU for an entry-level desktop PC, its designers have rolled it inside a gaming PC. 

The Phytium FT-2000/4 from the Chinese state-owned China Electronics Corporation (CEC) isn’t well-known outside the mainland, but the processor caught our attention earlier this year thanks to its considerably lower TDP of around 10 W. 

We expected the company to leverage the CPUs low power consumption to compete with inexpensive processors from AMD and Intel inside small form-factor desktops. It’s taking on the American processing behemoths all right, but with a well-stocked gaming rig.

Game on

Our sister publication Tom’s Hardware caught wind of the gaming PC from photographs posted on Chinese microblogging website, Weibo. 

It reports the PKS gaming PC pairs the FT-2000/4 processor with

Read More

Reliable Leaker Suggests Redesigned MacBooks in 2021 Will Include Both Apple Silicon and Intel Models

Reliable leaker known as “L0vetodream” has today suggested on Twitter that redesigned MacBooks coming in the second half of 2021 will include models with both Apple Silicon chips and Intel processors.

13 16 inch macbook pro air trio

The brief Tweet came in response to a MacRumors article from earlier today, which outlined a report from Ming-Chi Kuo claiming that Apple plans to release redesigned MacBook models with ‌Apple Silicon‌ in the second half of 2021.

L0vetodream simply says that the MacBook redesigns expected in the second half of 2021 will not be only for ‌Apple Silicon‌ models, implying that the redesigns will also come to new Intel-based MacBooks.

Apple just released its first ‌Apple Silicon‌ Macs, which include the MacBook Air and lower-end configurations of the 13-inch ‌MacBook Air‌ and Mac mini. While the new MacBook Pro and ‌Mac mini‌ still have a few shortcomings relative to their more expensive Intel counterparts, they are demonstrating better

Read More

Apple could include Intel in 2021 MacBook redesigns, vague rumor suggests

A leaker known for their accuracy has inferred that redesigned MacBook Air and MacBook Pro models said to launch in 2021 could ship with either Intel or Apple Silicon processors.

The leaker known as @L0vetodream on Twitter has shared an especially vague remark regarding a Ming-Chi Kuo report about future MacBook models published late on Monday. The tweet just suggests that the redesigned models destined for late 2021 would not be limited to Apple Silicon.

This suggests that future models of Apple’s popular MacBooks may still offer Intel variants. This is in direct contrast to what Apple’s SVP Greg Joswiak said in an interview on M1 processors.

“When we said we would support Intel systems for years to come, that was talking about the operating system.” Apple had previously commented that future Intel hardware was coming, but Joswiak said “We still had Intel systems that were in the pipeline” when

Read More