Secretary Lonnie Bunch on the Invisible Work of the Smithsonian’s Conservators | At the Smithsonian

After the Smithsonian collects an object, what happens to it? Some objects go on display, some become vital resources for researchers and scientists, some are loaned to peer institutions or federal agencies.

But none of this would be possible without conservation: the complex technical work to preserve, restore and research the 155 million objects in the Smithsonian collections. From pigment to porcelain, silk to stone, our conservators support the material needs of every Smithsonian museum. Whether protecting revered artifacts from rare bacteria or pioneering new methods in spectroscopy, Smithsonian staff combine object expertise and state-of-the-art technology to better understand the natural world, history, aerospace, archaeology and art.

I am awed by this work. It requires great technical acumen, ingenuity and meticulous attention to detail. Many of the objects we collect need serious TLC: intensive cleaning, painstaking repair, storage in a controlled and safe environment. And at the Smithsonian, we specialize

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Expected as a technology for visualization of the invisible change of object surfaces such as stress intensity and distribution — ScienceDaily

Under JST Strategic Basic Research Programs, PRESTO researcher Ayumi Ishii, (Toin University of Yokohama, specially appointed lecturer) has developed a photodiode using a crystalline film composed of lead perovskite compounds with organic chiral molecules to detect circularly polarized light without a filter.

A technology to detect “polarization,” or oscillation direction of light can visualize object surfaces with damages, foreign objects, and distortions. Furthermore, detection of “circularly polarized light,” or rotating electric field of light makes it possible for us to identify stress intensity and distribution of objects. Conventional photodiodes for camera or sensor applications cannot detect polarization of light directly, and therefore, various types of filters must be attached on top of the device to separate the information of polarization spatially. These structures cause substantial losses of sensitivity and resolution in the light detection, especially detection of circularly polarized light is heretofore considered difficult. Thus, it has been much desired

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How A 70-Year-Old Entrepreneur Reinvented The Invisible Fence

After selling his military startup, Ken Solinsky used his tech expertise to build a smarter canine enclosure using GPS. For pet owners, it’s a new leash on life.


Ken Solinsky wasn’t looking for a new business. He was living just outside Manchester, New Hampshire, after selling a military firm, Insight Technology, that he’d founded with his wife, Grace, to L-3 Communications (now L3Harris) in 2010. But in 2014 when an irrigation contractor he’d hired to work on a sprinkler system mentioned how often he’d accidentally cut the wires in invisible dog fences, Solinsky, a long-time dog owner, was intrigued. He wondered if he could design a completely wireless version that would get rid of homeowners’ frustrations and offer more flexibility.

 “I was floating ideas in my head, and checking for the sanity of them,” says Solinsky, now 70.

It took three years after he had the initial idea to develop

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The Invisible Threat: Building Cyber Resilience to Respond to the Rise in Third Party Cyberthreats

Last year, the number of targeted attacks — which often seek the crown jewels of sensitive, critical data — reported by the average federal agency soared from 211 to 320, a 53% increase. This is according to Accenture’s recent report, “State of Cyber Resilience – Federal Edition,” which surveys the threat landscape faced by federal agencies and the responses effective in quashing those threats. 

The good news is federal agencies are getting more adept about protecting their IT infrastructures and successfully thwarting traditional data breach methods, slashing the number of data breaches by 43% last year, according to the report. 

Even still, a new threat is looming: Increasingly, hackers, cyber criminals and other threat actors are finding new ways to infiltrate government systems through indirect attacks on suppliers, contractors and other third parties. Adversaries are shifting their target from an agency’s direct perimeter to the diffuse network of suppliers and

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New technology allows cameras to capture colors invisible to the human eye

New research from Tel Aviv University will allow cameras to recognize colors that the human eye and even ordinary cameras are unable to perceive.

The technology makes it possible to image gases and substances such as hydrogen, carbon and sodium, each of which has a unique color in the infrared spectrum, as well as biological compounds that are found in nature but are “invisible” to the naked eye or ordinary cameras. It has groundbreaking applications in a variety of fields from computer gaming and photography as well as the disciplines of security, medicine and astronomy.

The research was conducted by Dr. Michael Mrejen, Yoni Erlich, Dr. Assaf Levanon and Prof. Haim Suchowski of TAU’s Department of Physics of Condensed Material. The results of the study were published in the October 2020 issue of Laser & Photonics Reviews.

“The human eye picks up photons at wavelengths between 400 nanometers and

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