SpaceX CRS-21 to Launch Multiple Life Science Investigations to International Space Station Under National Lab Sponsorship

SpaceX CRS-21 to Launch Multiple Life Science Investigations to International Space Station Under National Lab Sponsorship

Press Release
From: Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS)
Posted: Wednesday, December 2, 2020

SpaceX is slated to launch its 21st commercial resupply services (CRS) mission, contracted through NASA, to the International Space Station (ISS) no earlier than December 5 at 11:39 a.m. EST. This is the first-time SpaceX will leverage an upgraded version of the Dragon cargo spacecraft to launch critical research and supplies to the orbiting laboratory. This launch comes on the heels of the successful launch and docking of SpaceX Crew-1, which delivered four astronauts and research to the space station for a six-month science mission. Over the coming months, the Crew-1 astronauts, along with NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, will work on many of the research investigations launching on SpaceX CRS-21 as part of Expedition 64.

Several investigations

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Lab Developing Device To Help Earth Dodge Asteroids

In a corner of the campus at Riga Technical University, a team of scientists is working on technology that could one day stop asteroids from smashing into Earth.

The high-precision timers being built by hand in the lab of Latvian start-up Eventech are currently being used to track satellites.

This year, the company won a European Space Agency (ESA) contract to develop timers that will study the possibility of re-directing an asteroid before it comes too close to our planet for comfort.

NASA plans to launch the first part of the Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission — known as the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) — on July 22, 2021 on a Falcon 9 rocket belonging to tech tycoon Elon Musk’s Space X.

The 500-kilogram (1,100-pound) camera-equipped probe will fly to an asteroid named Didymos and smash into it, trying to blow it off its current course that

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Lab results don’t explain ‘obesity paradox,’ but bias may — ScienceDaily

Results of standard laboratory tests performed on adult outpatients to provide an overall picture of their health are fairly consistent between those with obesity and their leaner counterparts, investigators report.

The finding negates one rationale behind what’s called the “obesity paradox,” which is that people with obesity are known to be at increased risk for a host of health problems like diabetes and hypertension, but tend to do better with these conditions than their leaner peers, including when they get admitted to critical care for reasons like heart attack or stroke.

One thought was that patients with obesity end up in intensive care sooner because their laboratory results were already out of line with their thinner peers, and these acute health events push them higher, they report in The Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine.

“People who have obesity also have more hypertension, they get more diabetes, they get more

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Rocket Lab says recovered booster in “good condition,” some parts will re-fly

Rocket Lab successfully launched its “Return to Sender” mission 10 days ago. Then, for the first time, the company attempted to recover the Electron booster’s first stage from the ocean after this launch, and now Rocket Lab has provided a preliminary assessment of the vehicle’s condition.

In summary, the company said in an update on its website, “We couldn’t have asked for a better outcome of our first recovery attempt and the team is thrilled.” The rocket came back in such good condition, the company added, “We will re-qualify and re-fly some components.”

The November 20 flight marked the first time Rocket Lab has fished an Electron out of the

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Startup founded by ‘Love Lab’ experts releases new platform and tech tools to assess relationships

(Affective Software Image)

Affective Software Inc., the startup founded by the leaders of the famed Gottman Institute, is releasing a new portal and products to harness technology in assessing and improving relationships.

The startup, which first revealed its plans back in May, has raised $400,000 in new funding from angel investors, adding to previous seed funding and bringing the company’s total to date to $2.9 million.

Affective Software was co-founded by Drs. John and Julie Gottman, who found fame with their research-based love and therapy Institute and the so-called “Love Lab,” which opened in 1986 at the University of Washington and was considered at the time to be the world’s original couples laboratory.

Microsoft veteran Rafael Lisitsa, a longtime engineer and technology executive, is also a co-founder and is Affective’s CEO and president.

The startup uses artificial intelligence and machine learning technology to bring the Gottman’s techniques to personal computing

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New 5G research lab to be created to help UK replace banned Huawei technology

The UK is to open a new 5G lab so that the country no longer has to rely on the technology of foreign companies like Huawei. 

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden has unveiled Government plans Monday for a £250 million scheme to develop new secure internet technology in Britain, which includes building a new research facility.

The lab will bring together security experts, businesses and leading academics to pioneer ways to create a more open 5G network that will allow smaller British companies to also develop the vital technology.

The move comes after ministers decided to ban the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei from the UK network in July over national security fears of its closeness to Beijing.

However, the decision leaves the UK facing a situation where it could be left dependent on just two large companies, Ericsson and Nokia, to supply all the hardware for the transformative next generation of

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The world’s newest monkey species was found in a lab, not on an expedition

The discovery of the Popa langur, a medium-sized leaf-eating monkey found in central Myanmar, was recently announced by scientists. It is estimated there are just 200 to 250 of these monkeys, which will likely mean the new species is classed as “critically endangered.” This find was announced just a week or so after two new species of greater glider – a gliding marsupial – were identified in Australia. But what do scientists mean when they announce the discovery of “new” mammalian species? Were these animals really unknown to science?



a monkey sitting on a tree branch: The Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) is named after the sacred Mount Popa, which holds the largest population of the species with just over 100 animals.


© Provided by Live Science
The Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) is named after the sacred Mount Popa, which holds the largest population of the species with just over 100 animals.

While discoveries such as the langur and the gliders are certainly exciting, it is important to clarify that these were not previously unseen species uncovered by some intrepid explorer. Rather, these

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Gaming Computer Black Friday Deals 2020: CyberpowerPC, NZXT, iBUYPOWER, Skytech & More Gaming Desktop Deals Monitored by Spending Lab

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Rocket Lab on road to reusability after successful booster recovery

Rocket Lab is now confident that its reusability dreams can come true.

The company recovered the first stage of its two-stage Electron rocket for the first time on Thursday (Nov. 19), fishing the booster out of the Pacific Ocean a few hours after it had helped launch a 30-satellite mission aptly called “Return to Sender.”

The stage survived its trip back from space in great shape, helping to validate Rocket Lab’s reusability vision, according to company founder and CEO Peter Beck.

“The test was a complete success,” Beck said during a call with reporters today (Nov. 23). “We’re really confident now that Electron can become a reusable launch vehicle.”

Related: Rocket Lab and its Electron booster (photos)

The 58-foot-tall (18 meters) Electron, which gives small satellites dedicated rides to orbit, has been an expendable vehicle since its debut launch in 2017. Last year, however, Beck announced that the company plans

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Small U.S. launch firm Rocket Lab recovers rocket, in test of reusability

FILE PHOTO: Rocket Lab CEO Peter Beck sits alongside a Rutherford rocket engine in Auckland, New Zealand, October 20 2015. REUTERS/Nigel Marple

(Reuters) – Small launch firm Rocket Lab was able to safely recover from the ocean a rocket it sent to space, its chief executive said on Monday, a key test of the company’s strategy to slash rocket launch costs via reusability.

California-based Rocket Lab’s 16th mission to space using its Electron rocket took off last Thursday from the company’s New Zealand launch site, with its four-storey-tall booster stage returning back to Earth under parachutes for the first time instead of burning up in the atmosphere.

The recovery test comes as other launch companies ramp up investments into reusable systems after the industry was jolted by successes from the reusable Falcon 9 rocket of Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

“What it really proved to us is that, yep, this is a

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