Geoscientists discover Ancestral Puebloans survived from ice melt in New Mexico lava tubes

Geoscientists discover Ancestral Puebloans survived from ice melt in New Mexico lava tubes
USF geosciences professor Bogdan Onac is pictured with ice deposit in New Mexico. Credit: University of South Florida

For more than 10,000 years, the people who lived on the arid landscape of modern-day western New Mexico were renowned for their complex societies, unique architecture and early economic and political systems. But surviving in what Spanish explorers would later name El Malpais, or the “bad lands,” required ingenuity now being explained for the first time by an international geosciences team led by the University of South Florida.


Exploring an ice-laden lava tube of the El Malpais National Monument and using precisely radiocarbon- dated charcoal found preserved deep in an ice deposit in a lava tube, USF geosciences Professor Bogdan Onac and his team discovered that Ancestral Puebloans survived devastating droughts by traveling deep into the caves to melt ancient ice as a water resource.

Dating back as far as AD 150

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Exoplanet Covered In Lava Offers A Glimpse Into Earth’s Distant Future

In a study published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, an international team of scientists describes a hellish exoplanet, providing a glimpse into Earth’s distant future.

In analyzing the illumination pattern of the exoplanet K2-141b, the team discovered that about two-thirds of the planet faces perpetual daylight. K2-141b is an Earth-size exoplanet orbiting an orange dwarf – stars which are slightly cooler than our own Sun – in the Aquarius constellation. K2-141b belongs to a subset of rocky planets that orbit very close to their star. The planet needs just six hours to make a full orbit. This proximity keeps the exoplanet gravitationally locked in place, meaning the same side always faces the star.

Based on this observation, the researchers tried to simulate the environmental

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This lava planet has a magma ocean and ‘rocky’ weather

That’s the portrait painted in a new study by scientists from McGill University, York University and the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research in Kolkata published on Tuesday in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The researchers described conditions on this planet, called K2-141b, which is located about 210 light-years from Earth. It orbits extremely closely around its star, which is just slightly smaller than our sun.

This “lava” planet completes a revolution in about six or seven hours, just about grazing the star’s surface as it hurtles through space.

By contrast, Mercury, the closest planet to the sun in our solar system, takes 87 days to orbit the sun.

“Almost half of the planet is molten magma,” said lead study author Tue Giang Nguyen, a doctoral student at York University in Toronto. “The atmosphere created by vaporized rocks spreads around the planet.”

That vaporized silicon dioxide,

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We’ve Found Oceans Of Molten Lava And ‘Rocky Rain’ On The Most Extreme Planet Yet, Say Scientists

Scientists have found an exoplanet of molten lava oceans where they forecast supersonic winds and “rocky rain.”

A fiery hot world that orbits its star so closely that a year takes less than seven hours, K2-141b is among the most extreme planets discovered thus far beyond the Solar System.

According to a study published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, scientists from McGill University, York University and the Indian Institute of Science Education, K2-141b has a surface, ocean and atmosphere all made up of the same thing—rock.

It’s thought that K2-141b is a place where rock is vaporized and falls as a mineral “rocky rain” that replenishes an ocean of molten lava.

MORE FROM FORBESThis Week Jupiter Aligns With Saturn. What Happens Next Will

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On this hellscape lava planet, it rains rock and the winds are supersonic

Exoplanet K2-141b lives in a close orbit to its star, making it a wild and inhospitable place.


Julie Roussy/Getty Images

If you ever need to feel more grateful for Earth, just take a moment to contemplate some of the truly horrifying exoplanets that lurk outside our solar system. Take, for example, K2-141b, a nightmare “lava planet” where it rains rock.

A team of researchers led by York University doctoral student Tue Giang Nguyen ran computer simulations to predict the conditions and weather on the extreme planet. K2-141b has the misfortune of being located close to its host star. It’s also oriented so that two-thirds of the planet is locked into blazing-hot perpetual light while the dark side remains frigid.

The scientists published a study on K2-141b in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Supersonic winds, rocky rains forecasted on lava planet — ScienceDaily

Among the most extreme planets discovered beyond the edges of our solar system are lava planets: fiery hot worlds that circle so close to their host star that some regions are likely oceans of molten lava. According to scientists from McGill University, York University, and the Indian Institute of Science Education, the atmosphere and weather cycle of at least one such exoplanet is even stranger, featuring the evaporation and precipitation of rocks, supersonic winds that rage over 5000 km/hr, and a magma ocean 100 km deep.

In a study published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the scientists use computer simulations to predict the conditions on K2-141b, an Earth-size exoplanet with a surface, ocean, and atmosphere all made up of the same ingredients: rocks. The extreme weather forecasted by their analysis could permanently change the surface and atmosphere of K2-141b over time.

“The study is the first

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Hellscape lava planet rains rocks, suffers from supersonic winds

Exoplanet K2-141b lives in a close orbit to its star, making it a wild and inhospitable place.


Julie Roussy/Getty Images

If you ever need to feel more grateful for Earth, then just take a moment to contemplate some of the truly horrifying exoplanets that lurk outside our own solar system. Take, for example, K2-141b, a nightmare “lava planet” where it rains rock.

A team of researchers led by York University doctoral student Tue Giang Nguyen ran computer simulations to predict the conditions and weather on the extreme planet. K2-141b has the misfortune of being located close to its host star. It’s also oriented so that two-thirds of the planet is locked into blazing-hot perpetual light while the dark side remains frigid.

The scientists published a study on K2-141b in the Monthly Notices of the Royal

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Indians opt for Samsung, Lava smartphones amid #boycottChina



a close up of a person holding a sign


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The anti-China sentiment in India has started going beyond social media.

Amid border tension between the two countries, one in every four retailers in non-metros in India has stopped stocking Chinese phones, as per a survey by consulting firm CyberMedia Research (CMR). The survey was conducted between April and September.

Several shopkeepers also said they were facing difficulties in convincing customers to buy Chinese brands.

#BoycottChina

Many customers told CMR that they are not only looking to boycott Chinese smartphones but would also shun retailers who sell brands from the country.

“Two in every five users stated that they have changed their mind of upgrading to a Chinese smartphone. This trend is pronounced amongst consumers in locations, such as Mumbai, Kanpur, Jabalpur, and Ranchi,” CMR survey said.

Indian customers are now inclined towards brands like Samsung and home-based phone makers like Lava.

Lately, Samsung has been

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