How New York Attorneys Are Riding the Waves of Legal Technologies

Internet of Things (IOT) technology with AR (Augmented Reality) on VR dashboard.business man hand using smart phone,laptop, online banking payment communication network technology. - ImageAcross the state of New York, new legal technologies continue to transform the legal sector, provoking waves of anxiety about the future of the legal profession. These waves were felt at the New York State Bar Association Annual Meeting in New York City earlier this year. The forum hosted a session titled “Emerging Technologies in Litigation,” the purpose of which was to discuss the changing role of technology in the courtroom—particularly the use of artificial intelligence (AI).

Participants learned that AI is already a fairly well-established phenomenon in the legal sector, even if attorneys have never interfaced with a legal tech product directly. Consider the Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS) program. According to one participant, the Hon. Melissa Crane of the New York City Civil Court, COMPAS uses AI in a risk assessment program, a tool that makes decisions about the kind of supervision an offender will

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Private spies reportedly infiltrated an Amazon strike, secretly taking photos of workers, trade unionists, and journalists. Now a union is taking legal action.



a person wearing sunglasses and standing in a parking lot: November 2018: An Amazon worker with a mask of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos posing during a strike on Black Friday in the main logistic center protesting demanding better working conditions. Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images


© Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images
November 2018: An Amazon worker with a mask of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos posing during a strike on Black Friday in the main logistic center protesting demanding better working conditions. Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • Private spies sub-contracted by the infamous Pinkerton Agency, a firm Amazon employs, infiltrated and photographed a worker strike at a warehouse on Black Friday 2019, according to a Spanish media report.
  • The spies compiled a 51-page document, which included photos of trade unionists, workers, and journalists who attended the strike, Spanish news site El Diario reported.
  • Amazon has used Pinkerton spies to track warehouse workers and labor movements at the company in the past, according to a November report.
  • Spanish labor union CCOO has asked a judge to seize documentation relating to the report ahead of potential legal action against Amazon. An Amazon spokesperson told El Diario
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Trump threatens to veto major defense bill unless Congress repeals Section 230, a legal shield for tech giants

President Trump on Tuesday threatened to veto an annual defense bill unless Congress repeals the federal law that spares Facebook, Google and other social-media sites from legal liability over their content-moderation decisions.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie


© Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images


Trump delivered the ultimatum targeting the digital protections, known as Section 230, in a late-night tweet that marked a dramatic escalation in his attacks against Silicon Valley over unproven allegations that the country’s tech giants exhibit bias against conservatives.

“Section 230, which is a liability shielding gift from the U.S. to ‘Big Tech’ (the only companies in America that have it – corporate welfare!), is a serious threat to our National Security & Election Integrity,” Trump tweeted.

Unless the “very dangerous & unfair Section 230 is not completely terminated as part of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA),” Trump continued, “I will be forced to unequivocally VETO the Bill when sent

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Hannity: Transparency, integrity at heart of Team Trump’s legal fight

This is a rush transcript from “Hannity” November 19, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SEAN HANNITY, FOX NEWS HOST: I thought I lost you for a second. It went blank. I said, wait a minute, what happened?

All right, Tucker, thank you.

Welcome to “Hannity.”

All right. Tonight, the Trump campaign vowing to investigate — by the way, wouldn’t every American want to have faith and confidence in your elections? Every election irregularity, legitimate claim of fraud and abuse, these are American people, sworn affidavits, so that every legal vote can be counted in a fair, verifiable way, and we need a system we can all have confidence in, don’t we? So, yeah, it’s worth it.

Coming up, we are going to have more on the recount developments in Wisconsin. Reince Priebus has an update. Ronna McDaniel

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Above the Law, Evolve the Law, and Legal Tech Media Group Partner to Deliver Revolutionary Legal Tech Content

NEW YORK, N.Y. and DEL MAR, Calif., Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Above the Law (ATL), Evolve the Law (ETL), and Legal Tech Media Group (LTMG) announced today they have partnered to launch ATL’s NON-EVENT, a new virtual resource for lawyers and law firms of all sizes to access the latest in legal tech information.

The legal profession has been experiencing rapid technological change, even before COVID-19, and that pace has accelerated exponentially during the pandemic. To help the legal community understand these changes and demonstrate how they impact lawyers, the partners have launched the ATL NON-EVENT: the first stop for news, opinions, reviews, how-tos, and the adoption of all things legal technology.

The Non-Event will be geared specifically for lawyers — the key decision-makers in a law firm’s buying decisions — instead of the niche technology professionals who are often served by technology events. Because of this approach,

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Wanted: DIY-style tools to boost legal tech adoption

Legal technology promises to make lawyers’ lives easier — and the pandemic has highlighted how much this is needed as working from home becomes widespread. But critics say its scale is unlikely to ever reach that of financial technology.

Demand from clients to achieve more with less has forced the legal profession to innovate in recent years, and the legal tech market has been growing fast, offering a vast range of products for specific uses.

The next step is to move from products with narrow uses to customisable tools that lawyers can use like building blocks according to their requirements, say legal tech proponents.

“A few years ago we had a lot of vendors appearing that created point solutions [for single issues] that were often used for very deep but narrow use cases,” says Oliver Campbell, head of practice operations at Hogan Lovells.

“They were great but they didn’t integrate

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Apple to cut app store fees as legal scrutiny intensifies

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple will cut its app store commissions in half for most developers beginning next year amid an intensifying debate about whether the iPhone maker has been using the fees to unfairly fatten its profits and stifle rivals competing against its own music, video, and other subscription services.

The concession announced Wednesday will lower Apple’s commissions for in-app subscriptions and other purchases from the 30% rate that has been in place since 2008 to 15%, effective Jan. 1. But the discount will only apply to developers with app store revenue up to $1 million annually — a threshold that excludes the makers of some of the most popular apps downloaded on iPhones, iPads and other Apple devices.

That group includes two of Apple’s fiercest critics, music streaming service Spotify, and Epic, the maker of the popular Fortnite video game.

Both those companies have helped spur increasing

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Does President Trump have a legal path to reelection?

This is a rush transcript from “Special Report” November 17, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

BRET BAIER, FOX NEWS HOST : Good evening, I’m Bret Baier. Breaking tonight, Rudy Giuliani makes the president’s case to try to change the election outcome in the key state of Pennsylvania. After the discovery of thousands of uncounted votes in Georgia, that gave the president and his supporters new ammunition in their quest to challenge the results of the election.

Well, the Republican Secretary of State in Georgia, speaking out about why the president fell short as that recount comes to the end. We are also learning more about the president’s plans for U.S. troops in the Middle East.

Chief White House correspondent John Roberts starts us off tonight with a lot of news from the North Lawn. Good evening, John.

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Tech’s legal shield draws substantive scrutiny.

A law that has legally shielded online platforms — Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act — has long been mentioned by lawmakers as a potential target for reform.

President Trump signed an executive order in May to curtail the law. And the legal shield, which largely protects tech companies from the liability for what their users post, has been the topic of other congressional hearings.

Yet when it came down to it, the debate on Section 230 has resulted in minimal concrete discussions. At a hearing last month with chief executives of the social media companies, there was little substantive debate and few suggestions about how to reform the law.

Not on Tuesday. At the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing with Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Jack Dorsey of Twitter, lawmakers approached Section 230 differently out of the gate. They began with a bipartisan call to change the “golden goose”

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Service NSW expecting cyber attack to set it back AU$7m in legal and investigation costs

Service NSW, the New South Wales government’s one-stop shop for service delivery, in April 2020 experienced a cyber attack that compromised the information of 186,000 customers.

Following a four-month investigation that began in April, Service NSW said it identified that 738GB of data, which comprised of 3.8 million documents, was stolen from 47 staff email accounts.

Service NSW assured, however, there was no evidence that individual MyService NSW account data or Service NSW databases were compromised during the attack.

“This rigorous first step surfaced about 500,000 documents which referenced personal information,” Service NSW CEO Damon Rees said in September. “The data is made up of documents such as handwritten notes and forms, scans, and records of transaction applications.”

In delivering its 2020-21 Budget on Tuesday, the government revealed the legal and investigative cost it is expected to incur from the attack.

“In April 2020, Service NSW alerted police and authorities

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