Nanoscopic barcodes set a new science limit

Nanoscopic barcodes set a new science limit
Different kinds of nanobarcodes can form a “library” for future nanoscale sensing applications. Credit: University of Technology Sydney

Using barcodes to label and identify everyday items is as familiar as a trip to the supermarket. Imagine shrinking those barcodes a million times, from millimeter to nanometre scale, so that they could be used inside living cells to label, identify and track the building blocks of life or, blended into inks to prevent counterfeiting. This is the frontier of nanoengineering, requiring fabrication and controlled manipulation of nanostructures at atomic level—new, fundamental research, published in Nature Communications, shows the possibilities and opportunities ahead.


The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) led collaboration developed a nanocrystal growth method that controls the growth direction, producing programmable atomic thin layers, arbitrary barcoded nanorods, with morphology uniformity. The result is millions of different kinds of nanobarcodes that can form a “library” for future nanoscale sensing applications.

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New UK tech regulator to limit power of Google and Facebook

A new tech regulator will work to limit the power of Google, Facebook and other tech platforms, the government has announced, in an effort to ensure a level playing field for smaller competitors and a fair market for consumers.



Alok Sharma wearing glasses and looking at the camera: Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Under the plans, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) will gain a dedicated Digital Markets Unit, empowered to write and enforce a new code of practice on technology companies which will set out the limits of acceptable behaviour.

The code will only affect those companies deemed to have “strategic market status”, though it has not yet been decided what that means, nor what restrictions will be imposed.

The business secretary, Alok Sharma, said: “Digital platforms like Google and Facebook make a significant contribution to our economy and play a massive role in our day-to-day lives – whether it’s helping us stay in

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Zoom’s new security feature should limit virtual meeting disruptions

  • Zoom revealed a new security feature that enables users to remove disruptive individuals from meetings.
  • We think the feature’s unveiling will help solidify Zoom’s position as an innovator in the video conferencing space.
  • Insider Intelligence publishes hundreds of insights, charts, and forecasts on the Connectivity & Tech industry with the Connectivity & Tech Briefing. You can learn more about subscribing here.

The video conferencing provider announced the launch of a new security enhancement in a recent blog post, which permits Zoom users to temporarily halt meetings to block the sharing of improper content and remove disruptive individuals from calls, per The Verge. For context, “Zoombombing” refers to the practice of bad actors infiltrating Zoom calls to display distressing or otherwise inappropriate content to meeting participants.

enterprise use of collaboration tools

Zoom revealed a new security feature that enables users to remove disruptive individuals from meetings

Insider Intelligence


With Zoom usage surging amid the pandemic,

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Twitter labels Trump’s latest claim about election fraud as ‘disputed’ but doesn’t limit dissemination

President Trump took to Twitter late Saturday to falsely claim he had won the 2020 presidential election, airing a fresh barrage of baseless attacks mere hours after Democratic candidate Joe Biden had achieved victory.



a large crowd of people walking down a street: People gather along 16th street in front of the White House to celebrate the presidential race being called in favor of President-elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)


© Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
People gather along 16th street in front of the White House to celebrate the presidential race being called in favor of President-elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

His post — coming after major media networks said Trump lost the election — prompted Twitter to immediately slap a label on the tweet, saying “This claim about election fraud is disputed.” The tech giant, however, took minimal action to limit Trump’s millions of followers from viewing it or re-sharing it widely.

The president’s all-caps tweet questioned the integrity of the vote, alleging “BAD THINGS” had occurred, even though he has not presented

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Google, Walmart’s PhonePe Hit by India’s Move to Limit Some Digital Payments Players | Technology News

By Sankalp Phartiyal and Nupur Anand

DELHI/MUMBAI (Reuters) – Global tech giant Google on Friday criticised India’s move to cap the share of transactions some companies within the country’s digital payments space can account for, saying it would hinder the nation’s burgeoning digital payments economy.

Google’s criticism came after India’s flagship payments processor the National Payments Corp of India (NPCI) on Thursday said third-party payments apps, from Jan. 1, will not be allowed to process more than 30% of the total volume of transactions on state-backed United Payments Interface (UPI) framework, which facilitates seamless peer-to-peer money transfers.

The move will likely stymie the growth of payments services offered by Facebook, Alphabet’s Google and Walmart, while boosting the likes of Reliance’s Jio Payments Bank and SoftBank-backed Paytm, which are armed with bank permits.

More than 2.07 billion UPI transactions were processed in October, according to NPCI, with Walmart’s PhonePe accounting for

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Alberta court ruling may limit smartphone, laptop searches at border crossings

An Alberta Court of Appeal ruling is likely to limit phone and laptop searches at Canadian border crossings, an Edmonton lawyer says.

The ruling comes after Kent Teskey’s client, Sheldon Canfield, was arrested at the Edmonton International Airport in 2014 when returning from Cuba. 

Canadian Border Services Agency officers flagged Canfield for a secondary screening because of his travel patterns and “overly friendly demeanor” according to court documents. 

During the screening, an officer came to believe Canfield had child pornography on his phone. 

Canfield admitted he did and showed the officer one of a number of child pornography images on the device. He was charged, convicted in 2018 and sentenced to 18 months in jail. 

Daniel Townsend was also arrested at the International airport in 2014. He was flagged when returning from Seattle. 

According to court documents Townsend was referred to secondary screening because the officer found his five-month travel

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Google, Walmart’s PhonePe hit by India’s move to limit some digital payments players

DELHI/MUMBAI (Reuters) – Global tech giant Google on Friday criticised India’s move to cap the share of transactions some companies within the country’s digital payments space can account for, saying it would hinder the nation’s burgeoning digital payments economy.

A man stands in front of a screen during a Google event in New Delhi, India September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi/File Photo

Google’s criticism came after India’s flagship payments processor the National Payments Corp of India (NPCI) on Thursday said third-party payments apps, from Jan. 1, will not be allowed to process more than 30% of the total volume of transactions on state-backed United Payments Interface (UPI) framework, which facilitates seamless peer-to-peer money transfers.

The move will likely stymie the growth of payments services offered by Facebook FB.O, Alphabet’s GOOGL.O Google and Walmart WMT.N, while boosting the likes of Reliance’s RELI.NS Jio Payments Bank

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New study demonstrates candidate’s potential to generate antibodies, limit viral shedding — ScienceDaily

A genetically edited form of a herpes simplex virus — rewired to keep it from taking refuge in the nervous system and eluding an immune response — has outperformed a leading vaccine candidate in a new study from the University of Cincinnati, Northwestern University and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Published Nov. 6 in the journal Nature Vaccines, the study found that vaccinating guinea pigs with the modified live virus significantly increased the production of virus-combating antibodies. When challenged with a virulent strain of herpes simplex virus, the vaccinated animals displayed fewer genital lesions, less viral replication and less of the viral shedding that most readily spreads infection to others.

The modified virus is actually a form of herpes simplex virus type 1, best known for causing cold sores around the lip. The fact that it demonstrated cross-protection against HSV type 2 — the sexually transmitted type usually responsible for

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To limit global warming, the global food system must be reimagined — ScienceDaily

Fossil fuel burning accounts for the majority of global greenhouse gas emissions, and to the world’s credit, several countries are working to reduce their use and the heat-trapping emissions that ensue. The goal is to keep global temperatures under a 1.5° to 2°C increase above preindustrial levels — the upper limits of the Paris Climate Agreement.

If we stopped burning all fossil fuels this minute, would that be enough to keep a lid on global warming?

Acording to UC Santa Barbara ecology professor David Tilman, petroleum energy sources are only part of the picture. In a paper published in the journal Science, Tilman and colleagues predict that even in the absence of fossil fuels, cumulative greenhouse gas emissions could still cause global temperatures to exceed climate change targets in just a few decades.

The source? Our food system.

“Global food demand and the greenhouse gases associated with it are

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Winchester’s extended speed limit works better than fake camera

Winchester residents Tracey Herrick, left and Robyn Hart check out the dummy speed camera on State Highway 1 in the township.

JOHN BISSET/Stuff

Winchester residents Tracey Herrick, left and Robyn Hart check out the dummy speed camera on State Highway 1 in the township.

A fake speed camera is getting no praise for some improved traffic behaviour through a South Canterbury town on State Highway 1.

The praise instead falls to Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency who has extended Winchester’s 50 kilometre per hour zone 140 metres north, putting the dummy camera well inside the wider area.

The change came after residents complained to the agency, making 62 submissions on having the 50kmh zone extended to include the SH1/North St intersection and delivering a petition signed by 268 people in 2019 supporting changes.

On Tuesday, Winchester residents reported improvements in motorist behaviour since the 50kmh speed limit area was extended and not because of the fake camera.

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* Lower speed limit for Burkes Pass following long campaign by residents

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