Blackcurrants are favorable for glucose metabolism — ScienceDaily

Blackcurrants have a beneficial effect on post-meal glucose response, and the required portion size is much smaller than previously thought, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

Blackcurrants have a beneficial effect on the blood glucose response after a meal. They balance the glucose response of ingested sugar by attenuating its rise and delaying its fall. The effect is likely associated with berry-derived polyphenolic compounds, anthocyanins, which are rich in blackcurrants.

The beneficial health effect of blackcurrants was supported by a recent study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland. In the clinical meal study (Maqua) the beneficial effect on postprandial glucose response was achieved by 75 g (1.5 dL) of blackcurrants, a remarkably smaller portion size than in earlier studies. Blackcurrants are often consumed with added sugar because of their natural sourness, which may be a cause of concern for health-conscious consumers. However, it seems that

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Metabolism influences parasite’s resistance to drugs — ScienceDaily

New insight on how a parasite can resist current therapies has been published today in the open-access eLife journal.

The study in cultures of human cells infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the parasite that causes Chagas disease, suggests that its metabolic state influences the effectiveness of azole drugs that inhibit its growth. These findings could be useful for the development of more effective antimicrobial treatments.

Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, can cause a sudden, brief (acute) illness, or it may be a long-lasting (chronic) condition. Around six to seven million people worldwide are estimated to be infected with the T. cruzi pathogen that causes the disease, according to the World Health Organization. Symptoms can range from mild to severe, but do not often appear until the chronic stage of disease.

“The goal for the treatment of Chagas and other infectious diseases is to eliminate the pathogen

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Bacterial metabolism of dietary soy may lower risk factor for dementia — ScienceDaily

A metabolite produced following consumption of dietary soy may decrease a key risk factor for dementia — with the help of the right bacteria, according to a new discovery led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Their study, published today in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, reports that elderly Japanese men and women who produce equol — a metabolite of dietary soy created by certain types of gut bacteria — display lower levels of white matter lesions within the brain.

“White matter lesions are significant risk factors for cognitive decline, dementia and all-cause mortality,” said lead author Akira Sekikawa, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health. “We found 50% more white matter lesions in people who cannot produce equol compared to people who can produce it, which is a surprisingly huge effect.”

To obtain this

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