Moderna Covid vaccine is 94.1% effective, plans to apply for emergency OK Monday

Moderna said Monday it will request emergency clearance from the Food and Drug Administration for its coronavirus vaccine after new data confirms the vaccine is more than 94% effective in preventing Covid-19 and was safe.

Moderna will be the second drugmaker to seek emergency use from the FDA after Pfizer, another front-runner in the Covid-19 vaccine race, applied for the same authorization on Nov. 20. The announcement means some Americans could get the first doses of Moderna’s two-dose vaccine within a few weeks.

The new analysis from Moderna evaluated 196 confirmed Covid infections among the late-stage trial’s 30,000 participants. The company said 185 cases of Covid were observed in the placebo group versus 11 cases observed in the group that received its vaccine. That resulted in an estimated vaccine efficacy of 94.1%, the company said.

The company released on Nov. 16 an early analysis of its phase three trial based

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Moderna designed a covid-19 vaccine in just two days thanks to mRNA technology


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This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


As laboratories are working hard to develop a vaccine against COVID-19, it emerged that the American pharmaceutical company Moderna took only two days to design its proposal. The speed of response is a result of the use of new mRNA technology, but how does it work?

What could be the greatest scientific advance of the decade was designed in just 48 hours, according to a New York Times report. Mind you, it took them more than three decades of research to come up with a coronavirus vaccine in record time.

Moderna’s vaccine is based on messenger RNA, a piece of ribonucleic acid that carries information about the amino acid sequence of a specific protein from the DNA, where all that information is stored, to the ribosome,

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Pfizer and Moderna use mRNA in their COVID-19 vaccines. This never-before-used technology could transform how science fights diseases.

The success of two COVID-19 candidate vaccines marks a turning point in the long history of vaccines and could lead to major advances against a variety of diseases.

COVID-19 vaccine candidates from Moderna and Pfizer both promising

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Vaccines developed by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna are more than 95% effective against COVID-19, trials show. Both depend on a technology never before used in a commercial vaccine that could upend the way future ones are made.

This new messenger RNA technology, as well another method that depends on viruses to deliver vaccines, are transforming the field, said Brendan Wren, a professor of vaccinology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.



a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is being shipped in specially designed, insulated containers that hold between 195 and 975 five-dose vials and are about the size of a carry-on suitcase. The vials are stored in flat, pizza box-sized compartments, each of which holds 195 vials. A fully-loaded thermal container, which is reusable, contains five of these and weighs about 70 pounds. These "shippers" as Pfizer calls them have space at the top for dry ice, which can keep the vaccine at the necessary temperature for ten days if unopened, or five days as long as it’s opened no more than twice a day for very short periods of time


© Pfizer Inc.
Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine is being shipped in specially designed, insulated containers that hold between 195 and 975 five-dose vials and are about the size of a carry-on suitcase. The vials are stored in

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Vaccine mRNA research from Moderna, Pfizer vs COVID huge for science

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Pfizer and Moderna have both announced promising results in the phase 3 trials of their COVID-19 vaccines. Here’s how they differ.

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The success of two COVID-19 candidate vaccines marks a turning point in the long history of vaccines and could lead to major advances against a variety of diseases.

Vaccines developed by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna are more than 95% effective against COVID-19, trials show. Both depend on a technology never before used in a commercial vaccine that could upend the way future ones are made.

This new messenger RNA technology, as well another method that depends on viruses to deliver vaccines, are transforming the field, said Brendan Wren, a professor of vaccinology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

“It could be quite a new era for vaccines and vaccinology,” he said. “We seemed to move ahead in this one year 10 years.”

These technologies had

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Success of Pfizer, Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines ushers in ‘new era’

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Pfizer and Moderna have both announced promising results in the phase 3 trials of their COVID-19 vaccines. Here’s how they differ.

Storyful

The success of two COVID-19 candidate vaccines marks a turning point in the long history of vaccines and could lead to major advances against a variety of diseases.

Vaccines developed by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna are more than 95% effective against COVID-19, trials show. Both depend on a technology never before used in a commercial vaccine that could upend the way future ones are made.

This new messenger RNA technology, as well another method that depends on viruses to deliver vaccines, are transforming the field, said Brendan Wren, a professor of vaccinology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

“It could be quite a new era for vaccines and vaccinology,” he said. “We seemed to move ahead in this one year 10 years.”

These technologies had

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When Pfizer, Moderna vaccines could be available, and the genetic science behind how they work

In a year when every turn of the calendar brought more bad news, the recent announcements that two coronavirus vaccines are more than 90% effective is a rare shot of good news.

Moderna and Pfizer both revealed promising results this month for the mRNA vaccine candidates both companies are developing.

Moderna, which worked with scientists from the National Institutes of Health, said Monday its vaccine was 94.5% effective against SARS-CoV-2 and the disease it causes, COVID-19. Last week Pfizer and BioNTech said preliminary results show its COVID-19 vaccine is 95% effective.

For this week’s FAQ Friday, we answer questions about COVID-19 vaccines, the findings of which have not yet been peer-reviewed.

When will the vaccines be available?

Pfizer said Friday it applied to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for emergency authorization for its vaccine. The FDA and an independent committee will then make a recommendation. Moderna is expected to

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What is mRNA? How Pfizer and Moderna tapped new tech to make coronavirus vaccines

For decades, vaccine researchers have been enchanted and frustrated with the promise of messenger RNA. The tiny snippets of genetic code are essential in telling cells to build proteins, a basic part of human physiology — and key to unleashing the immune system.

But they’ve been hard to tame, at least until the coronavirus spurred a global race to create a vaccine.

Now, both Pfizer and Moderna are testing their separate vaccine candidates that use messenger RNA, or mRNA, to trigger the immune system to produce protective antibodies without using actual bits of the virus. If the experimental coronavirus vaccines win approval from the Food and Drug Administration, they will be the first-ever authorized vaccines that use mRNA — a development that would not only turn the tide in this pandemic but could also unlock an entirely new line of vaccines against a variety of viruses.

The two experimental vaccines

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Vaccine tech used by Moderna, Pfizer, could be programmed to fight other diseases

The new technology behind Pfizer’s and Moderna’s coronavirus vaccines could be used to prevent everything from heart disease to cancer, experts say. 

The breakthrough vaccine ‘platform’ they use transforms the body into a virus-zapping vaccine factory and could be retooled to run interference on other diseases and speed the development of shots to prevent future pandemics. 

So-called messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines have now seen great success in late-stage trials by Moderna as well as Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech, and their efficacy for COVID-19 serve the first proof the concept works.

Both experimental vaccines had efficacy rates above 90 percent based on interim findings, which was far higher than expected and well above the 50 percent threshold U.S. regulators insist upon for vaccines.

Now scientists say the technology, a slow-motion revolution in the making since the discovery of mRNA nearly 60 years ago, could speed up the development

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