New Defense Bill Would Reestablish Cybersecurity Position Previously Nixed by Trump Administration

A provision to establish a national cybersecurity director at the White House has been included in the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which outlines the budget for national defense spending. In 2018, the administration of President Donald Trump eliminated a similar position.



James Langevin wearing a suit and tie sitting on a stage: The 2021 National Defense Authorization Act could provide for a new national director of cybersecurity, according to Rhode Island Congressman Jim Langevin.


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The 2021 National Defense Authorization Act could provide for a new national director of cybersecurity, according to Rhode Island Congressman Jim Langevin.

Rhode Island Democrat Congressman Jim Langevin, a senior member of the House Armed Servies Committee, co-introduced separate legislation in June to create the position. The provision included in the 2021 NDAA is based on that legislation, known as the National Cyber Director Act.

“I’ve been working on bolstering our nation’s cybersecurity for more than a decade, and it is abundantly clear the country needs someone in charge of cybersecurity at the highest levels

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Bay Area Council, Stanford win as Trump admin rules nixed

The Bay Area Council, Stanford University and a host of other business and educational groups scored a legal victory over the administration of President Donald Trump on Tuesday, with a federal judge tossing out new rules for the H-1B visa.

“This is a major win for our economy and for our ability to recover from the worst downturn in generations,” Bay Area Council CEO Jim Wunderman said in a statement. “H-1B workers fill an important need in our economy and provide immense benefits not only to the companies they work for but the communities where they live. Many of the leading and fastest-growing technology companies in the Bay Area have been founded by entrepreneurs from other countries who first came here on visas.”

The rules issued in October by the federal departments of Labor and Homeland Security had imposed a one-year limit on placement of H-1B workers at third-party firms,

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