Dr. Mary Fowkes, 66, Dies; Helped Science Understand the Pandemic

Dr. Mary Fowkes, a neuropathologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan whose autopsies of Covid-19 victims early in the pandemic discovered serious damage in multiple organs — a finding that led to the successful use of higher doses of blood thinners to treat patients — died on Nov. 15 at her home in Katonah, N.Y., in Westchester County. She was 66.

Her daughter, Jackie Treatman, said the cause was a heart attack.

When Dr. Fowkes (rhymes with “pokes”) and her team began their autopsies, little was known about the novel coronavirus, which was believed to be largely a respiratory disease. The first few dozen autopsies revealed that Covid-19 affected the lungs and other vital organs, and that the virus probably traveled through the body in the endothelial cells, which line the interior of blood vessels.

“We saw very small and very microscopic blood clots in the lungs, the heart, the

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Delta 9 Develops Proprietary Decontamination Technology to Help Fight COVID-19 Pandemic

WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Nov. 25, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — DELTA 9 CANNABIS INC. (TSX: DN) (OTCQX: VRNDF) (“Delta 9” or the “Company”), is pleased to announce that it has developed and validated new proprietary decontamination equipment, branded the “Decontamination Pod” (or “D-Pod”), which can be used to decontaminate medical supplies, personal protective equipment (“PPE”), and other equipment.

Canadian and US patent applications have been filed on behalf of the Company for the D-Pod, which is a standard shipping container retrofitted to include heating and ultraviolet light technologies. When PPE or other materials are placed inside the treatment area of the D-Pod, the combination of heat and UVC is sufficient to kill the COVID-19 virus.

“This technology could be a game changer for governments, hospitals, and care-facilities in the fight against COVID-19, allowing them to decontaminate large amounts of PPE and other equipment, increasing the availability of existing PPE inventories and preventing

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As the pandemic shatters Americans’ mental health, the FDA, psychiatrists, and developers are betting on smartphone apps to treat them directly



a man holding a sign in front of a television: A woman seen walking past a charity's shopfront in Stoke-on-Trent, England, on October 28, 2020.


A woman seen walking past a charity’s shopfront in Stoke-on-Trent, England, on October 28, 2020.

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the US mental-health crisis, with apps like Calm and Headspace booming as people try to cope.
  • Now, a new cohort of apps are working to directly treat mental illness, rather than just help people get by.
  • Three such companies told Business Insider their programs can drive similar results as medication, and said they believe in-person therapy is outdated.
  • The Food and Drug Administration has in recent months moved to help these mental-health apps become more available.
  • Experts at the FDA, National Institute of Mental Health, and American Psychiatric Association told Business Insider that evidence indicates the apps work, and that regulators are frantically playing catch up.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic has precipitated a universal mental-health crisis.

Symptoms of anxiety and depression are rising across

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Time to rethink predicting pandemic infection rates? — ScienceDaily

During the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Joseph Lee McCauley, a physics professor at the University of Houston, was watching the daily data for six countries and wondered if infections were really growing exponentially. By extracting the doubling times from the data, he became convinced they were.

Doubling times and exponential growth go hand in hand, so it became clear to him that modeling based on past infections is impossible, because the rate changes unforeseeably from day to day due to social distancing and lockdown efforts. And the rate changes differ for each country based on the extent of their social distancing.

In AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, McCauley explains how he combined math in the form of Tchebychev’s inequality with a statistical ensemble to understand how macroscopic exponential growth with different daily rates arise from person-to-person disease infection.

“Discretized ordinary chemical kinetic equations applied to infected, uninfected,

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Pandemic has forced producers to bring new technology to sets

A week ago Monday, cast and crew of the Amazon series “Goliath” gathered to check in for a day of filming at Santa Clarita Studios.

Despite the pandemic, the fourth season of the show is back in action, thanks in part to technology that helps track COVID-19 testing for hundreds of cast and crew members, including stars such as Billy Bob Thornton.

As people arrived on set, a COVID safety officer scanned color-coded IDs with embedded chips that could be read by portals stationed around the set. The chips would collect and track data on the movements of cast and crew in case any of them came into contact with someone who tested positive for the disease.

This system, called Safe Set, was recently launched by Culver City-based Greg Guzzetta, a former production manager who spent the last decade providing public safety technology for live music events.

After the pandemic

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Sportsdigita’s software, used by major sports teams, sees growth during pandemic

Angelina Lawton

Source: John Wagner

Sportsdigita, an all-in-one cloud-based presentation software company owned by former National Hockey League executive Angelina Lawton, sees opportunity amid the pandemic as sports teams conduct business online instead of in person.

The company, which counts the Chicago Bears, Los Angeles Lakers, Boston Red Sox, Pittsburgh Steelers and New York Yankees among its clients, is raising $10 million to $25 million in Series A funding. It may use some of the money it rasies to acquire smaller firms that have been hurt financially by Covid-19.

Sportsdigita is a subscription-based software company that’s seen growth since Covid-19 halted in-person meetings. It offers customized presentations and integrates video conferencing and presentation software. It competes with other services, like Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Teams, both of which are included in an Office subscription.

But Sportsdigita considers itself “PowerPoint on steroids” because its Digideck software offers customized presentations for sports

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PEDSnet report details how COVID-19 pandemic has affected children — ScienceDaily

In the most comprehensive analysis to date of U.S. children tested and treated for COVID-19, an organization representing seven of the nation’s largest pediatric medical centers reports that some groups of children are faring significantly worse than children in general during the pandemic.

Findings from the PEDSnet organization — which includes Cincinnati Children’s — were published Nov. 23, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. The report is based on electronic medical records data from more than 135,000 children who have been tested for infections from the SARS-CoV-2 virus from Jan. 1 through Sept. 8, 2020.

“These findings are important because they improve our understanding of the impact of COVID-19 in the pediatric population,” says Nathan Pajor, MD, a pulmonary medicine specialist at Cincinnati Children’s and a co-author of the study. “We see that relative to adults, kids are less likely to have severe disease or to die from COVID-19. However, we

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Hydroponics Technologies Market | Insights on the Crisis and the Roadmap to Recovery From COVID-19 Pandemic | Technavio

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Technavio has been monitoring the hydroponics technologies market and it is poised to grow by USD 450.18 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of almost 15% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. Download a Free Sample Report on COVID-19

Impact of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to transform the growth of various industries. However, the immediate impact of the outbreak is varied. While a few industries will register a drop in demand, numerous others will continue to remain unscathed and show promising growth opportunities. COVID-19 will have At Par impact on the hydroponics technologies market. The market growth in 2020 is likely to increase compared to the market growth in 2019.

Frequently Asked Questions-

  • Based on segmentation by technology, which is the leading segment in the market?
  • The
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Pandemic boost to tech and digital industries worsens gender job divide

The boost given by the pandemic to the digital, automation and technology industries is set to exacerbate gender inequality in the workplace, as the new jobs being created are being taken largely by men.

The pandemic is driving a shift in companies’ use of technology, both official statistics and business surveys suggest, making the automation and digitalisation industries some of the few winners from this year’s economic turbulence.

Nearly 800,000 additional jobs have been created in computer programming and related services across the EU, the US, the UK, Japan and Australia so far this year, according to an FT analysis of official data. The number of other tech-related professional jobs in areas such as information technology and telecoms was also up in some countries, with men over-represented in both sectors.

This is in sharp contrast to the overall jobs market — unemployment has risen in most major developed economies

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Kazakh Fintech Star Kaspi A Pandemic Bright Spot

With most staff working from home, the headquarters of Kazakhstan’s fintech hero Kaspi.kz exudes a sleepiness ill-fitting for a company whose rapid rise has been accelerated by the coronavirus pandemic.

Kaspi, Kazakhstan’s payment systems and e-commerce leader, became the Central Asian country’s most valuable firm after it was valued at $6.5 billion on the London stock exchange in October in what was the United Kingdom’s second largest float of this year.

The listing took commentators by surprise, coming after a failed attempt — falling short of a $4 billon market cap valuation — the year before.

But Kaspi’s Georgia-born CEO Mikheil Lomtadze, told AFP that the company and its investors, including Goldman Sachs and CIS-focused Baring Vostok — were not fazed by the false start.

“We believe that we have a lot of space for further growth, and we were not in any hurry to do our IPO,” said Lomtadze

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