Pigment raises $25.9 million to ‘reboot the spreadsheet’ with next-gen business forecasting

Pigment, which is setting out to “reboot the spreadsheet” and give businesses a “multidimensional view” of their data with its platform, has raised $25.9 million in a series A round of funding led by Blossom Capital.

Founded out of Paris in 2019, Pigment touts itself as a business forecasting platform that circumvents the limitations of “error-prone” spreadsheets and inflexible software to bring a “new standard” to planning and modeling. The platform is still in closed beta, though the company claims to have secured some undisclosed high-profile clients, including a major European bank and pre-IPO startups.

Pigment’s founding team includes co-CEOs Eléonore Crespo, a former financial analyst at Google who later joined Index Ventures as an investor, and Romain Niccoli, cofounder and former CTO of advertising tech giant Criteo.

Incumbents

Pigment is entering a space occupied by some long-standing incumbents, including Anaplan, Workday (which acquired Adaptive Insights in 2018), and trusty

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Scientists are getting closer to figuring out how to synthesize a plant pigment that could have medicinal uses — ScienceDaily

Nagoya University scientists have furthered understanding of how plants make a common pigment that might have medicinal applications. They published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.

“We studied black soybeans and found a new biosynthetic precursor of the most common anthocyanin in plants,” says Kumi Yoshida of Nagoya University, who led the study and specializes in natural products chemistry.

Anthocyanins are plant pigments with anti-oxidant activities. They are responsible for many of the red through purple to blue colors found in flowers, fruits, vegetables and roots. Scientists are currently researching their medicinal potential for treating metabolic diseases like diabetes and obesity. But so far, anthocyanins can only be extracted from plants. Scientists want to be able to synthesize large amounts of the pure compounds to accelerate research into their potential benefits, which requires understanding how plants make them.

The most common anthocyanin is cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3G). Scientists

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Scientific analysis of an ancient portrait pigment reveals long-lost artistic details — ScienceDaily

How much information can you get from a speck of purple pigment, no bigger than the diameter of a hair, plucked from an Egyptian portrait that’s nearly 2,000 years old? Plenty, according to a new study. Analysis of that speck can teach us about how the pigment was made, what it’s made of — and maybe even a little about the people who made it. The study is published in the International Journal of Ceramic Engineering and Science.

“We’re very interested in understanding the meaning and origin of the portraits, and finding ways to connect them and come up with a cultural understanding of why they were even painted in the first place,” says materials scientist Darryl Butt, co-author of the study and dean of the College of Mines and Earth Sciences.

Faiyum mummies

The portrait that contained the purple pigment came from an Egyptian mummy, but it doesn’t

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