The 2020 election polls were less accurate than those in 2016, our ranking finds.

So how did pollsters do in 2020?

After 2016, pollsters worked to fix problems

After the 2016 election, we worked with political scientist Aaron Weinschenk to release analyses, revealing 2016’s final, national pre-election polls were actually more accurate than they had been in 2012. They pretty closely forecast the popular vote, even if Donald Trump snagged victory in the electoral college. We found a slight pro-Democratic bias that was mostly not statistically significant.

That suggests that, overall, the 2016 national pre-election polls were generally accurate and unbiased. That year’s state-level polls similarly underestimated Republican support, but here too these biases were generally statistically insignificant. The larger problem — at least for those who wanted to know the outcome in advance — was too few quality statewide polls in key battleground states, compared with previous years.

Nevertheless, the discrepancy between poll projections and the eventual outcome pushed many pollsters to reconsider

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Science May Be The Real Winner In 2020 Polls

As the 2020 election looms, an intriguing new poll shows that Americans agree on one key issue: science. The survey published by Research!America shows that Americans overwhelmingly support science, regardless of their political parties.

According to the survey analysis, a strong majority of Americans agree that “the Covid-19 pandemic is a disruptive event and requires urgent refocusing of America’s commitment to science.” 88% believe that science benefits them and 89% believe that America should maintain its global leadership in science. Exactly. 

The unprecedented avalanche of misinformation that has been spread during the Covid-19 pandemic has been discouraging to both scientists and the public they serve. As people struggle to find the information they need to make decisions about life in the pandemic, the survey indicates that they still consider science the standard. 

Not only were survey participants committed to science,

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Polls close in California on Proposition 22 on allowing Lyft and Uber drivers to be independent contractors

  • Polls have closed in California on Proposition 22, which would allow companies to hire app-based drivers as independent contractors instead of employees of the company.
  • A recent study from the University of California, Santa Cruz shows that over 70% of gig workers work more than 30 hours a week but do not receive most employee benefits.
  • Insider will have live results on the propositions as soon as they come in.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

California’s 2020 ballot includes Prop 22, which would allow app-based drivers and delivery workers to work as independent contractors instead of company employees. State law currently requires rideshare and delivery companies to hire drivers as employees, not independent contractors.

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A recent study from the University of California, Santa Cruz shows that over 70% of gig workers work more than 30 hours a week but do not receive most employee benefits. If

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R.I. political status quo upended as House Speaker trails at the polls

“That is a game changer,” Providence College political science Professor Adam Myers said. “We are in a new era of Rhode Island state government.”

While progressives have been making inroads in recent elections, the House and Senate have been led by Mattiello and Senate President Dominick J. Ruggerio, both Democrats with “A” ratings from the NRA who voted against abortion rights legislation last year.

“It’s most likely going to lead to an increase in progressive social legislation coming out of the State House,” Myers aid. “And I think, increasingly, the House will start to resemble a legislative chamber like we see in a lot of blue states.”

Amid the pandemic, the state is facing enormous budget deficits, hoping for further federal aid while bracing for potential spending cuts, job reductions, or tax increases.

So a loss by Mattiello would have major implications for looming state budget and taxation decisions, Myers

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The voting technology problems that could trigger panic at the polls

While mail-in voting has raised fears and sparked court battles during this election, problems with technology ranging from voting machines to results websites could just as easily disrupt voting or sow doubts about the outcome.

Newly competitive battleground state Georgia is using controversial touch screen voting machines for the first time in a presidential election. In the critical swing state of Pennsylvania, where new voting machines malfunctioned last year, several counties have now also configured those machines to speed up ballot-counting in a way that doesn’t give voters a chance to hold the ballots in their hands.

And voting machines could turn out to be the least of the technological problems. Across the country, the servers that store voter data and post unofficial results are vulnerable to temporary outages — snafus that could worsen long lines on Election Day, block or discourage voters from casting ballots or fuel claims of

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Blue Cross Blue Shield partners with Bluebikes to offer free rides to the polls on Election Day

Need a lift to the polls on Election Day? Head to your nearest Bluebikes station for a free socially distanced ride to your polling location.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts will sponsor free bike rentals on Nov. 3 from more than 350 Bluebikes stations in eight Greater Boston municipalities: Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Somerville, Arlington, Everett, Newton, and Watertown.

The organization introduced this effort after a survey conducted by the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement found that 30 percent of registered youth did not vote in the 2016 presidential election because they could not find transportation to the polls.

Using the Bluebikes mobile app, voters can use the map feature to find the closest station to them and their polling location. Once they arrive at a station, they can activate an “Adventure Pass” on the app to unlock a bike and enjoy unlimited two-hour bike

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Drive-thru voting, wait-time technology and more safety measures at the polls this election

“No one should have to choose between their right to vote and their health.”

Mask-wearing, social distancing and good hand hygiene will continue to play their part in minimizing COVID-19 risk as millions head to the polls during a global pandemic. But voters can also expect to encounter new protocols, tools and, in some cases, polling sites to help keep people safe.

PHOTO: Cameron County early voting clerk Crystal Garcia sanitizes the plastic shields for the poll worker's station, Oct. 15, 2020, before the early voting polling location opens in Brownsville, Texas.

Cameron County early voting clerk Crystal Garcia sanitizes the plastic shields for the poll worker’s station, Oct. 15, 2020, before the early voting polling location opens in Brownsville, Texas.

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Lagging in the Polls, Trump Team Predicts Win Based on ‘Enthusiasm’

Trailing Democratic rival Joe Biden in most major national polls, President Donald Trump and his supporters say a different metric—enthusiasm—is all that matters, and they point to massive crowds at his rallies in key swing states as evidence that he’ll pull off a win on November 3.



Donald Trump standing in front of a crowd: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at North Coast Air aeronautical services at Erie International Airport on October 20, 2020 in Erie, Pennsylvania. Trump is holding the rally two days ahead of the final presidential debate.


© Jeff Swensen/Getty
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at North Coast Air aeronautical services at Erie International Airport on October 20, 2020 in Erie, Pennsylvania. Trump is holding the rally two days ahead of the final presidential debate.

President Donald Trump 2020 Reelection Campaign Facts

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“We’re going to win,” Trump said Monday in a call his campaign invited reporters to join. “I wouldn’t have told you that maybe two or three weeks ago.”

But experts aren’t so sure and say enthusiasm may not be enough to treat Trump’s campaign wounds.

Ben Berger, a

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