Pompeii ruins unearth ‘master and slave’ remains

The grisly remains of a master and his slave in their final death throes have been discovered amid the ruins of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.

The skeletal remains of what are believed to have been a rich man and his male slave attempting to escape death were found during excavations in the Civita Giuliana area.

Parts of the skulls and bones of the two men were found near a cryptoporticus, or covered gallery, of an ancient villa. Casts of the skeletons have been made, according to the Archaeological Park of Pompeii.

SHOCKING POMPEII DISCOVERY: EXPERTS FIND EVIDENCE OF NEURONS IN VESUVIUS VICTIM

Pompeii officials said the men apparently escaped the initial fall of ash from Mount Vesuvius, then succumbed to a powerful volcanic blast that took place the next morning. The later blast “apparently invaded the area from many points, surrounding and burying the victims in ash,” Pompeii

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UCF Programs Add to Pompeii Exhibit at Orlando Science Center

Several UCF programs are being presented in partnership with the Orlando Science Center’s exhibit of Pompeii: The Immortal City, which will run through Jan. 24.

The traveling display, the third and final stop in the United States, presents artwork, artifacts, interactive devices and multimedia experiences to show the effects of the AD 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which buried the Roman city of Pompeii.

Life and Death in Pompeii will be a UCF webinar presentation and discussion at noon Friday, Nov. 6, about the era and what was going on at the time of the eruption. Historians of art, archaeology, and classical languages and literatures will present their research. Ilenia Colón Mendoza will moderate the symposium and a Q&A will follow each of three topics:

  • “Greek and Roman Myths in the Houses of Pompeii and the Bay of Naples” with Robert Vander Poppen, an associate professor of classical art and
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UCF CREATE’s Work with Children Featured in Pompeii Exhibit at Orlando Science Center

Visitors to the international Pompeii exhibit currently running at the Orlando Science Center (OSC) will get to see frescos from the city buried under ash — as well as frescos made by first, second, and third graders living in neighborhoods around downtown Orlando.

Through the UCF Center for Research and Education in Arts, Technology, and Entertainment (CREATE)’s Extended Classroom Experience program, three classes from Lake Eola Charter School learned about the art and science of making frescos, a painting technique common in ancient Italy that involves plaster and pigment.

The new 10,000 square foot immersive exhibit at the OSC opened earlier this month and will wrap up in January 2021. “Pompeii: the Lost City” provides a look at the archaeological site destroyed by the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. From interactive mechanical devices to artifacts from the time and an erupting volcano display, the exhibition captures the

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