Problems downloading Google apps on your Huawei smartphone? This is the reason

The conflict between the Chinese technology company and the US government could prevent you from using your favorite applications.

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This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


If you recently released a Huawei brand smartphone , you may have a problem installing Google applications. The reason behind the new “failure” would be the fight that the United States government maintains against the Chinese multinational.

Last September, Huawei announced that its devices would no longer have Google services by default. Despite the decision, there were ways to download the tech giant’s apps, but now they are failing. In addition, it is possible that smartphones that already had Google installed also begin to present difficulties.

A Reddit user reported problems downloading the

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the tech kids solving life’s problems

Adarsh Ambati, 15, San Jose, California

I started getting interested in coding when I was about 11. I joined a local community lab where biologists and computer scientists come together and conduct experiments. I wanted to join the lab because my brother was really into biology and at the time I wanted to be exactly like him. I was too young to participate in the experiments, so my mentor pushed me more towards coding.

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Then a couple of years ago my mum had a third-degree heart block and had to go to hospital where she was hooked up to so many different wires to monitor her health. But the wires ended up hindering her health because they stopped her moving around. I wanted to make something that could help her and other people feel better by having their mobility restored, while still being able to monitor their vital

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Crypto exchange Coinbase hit by connection, latency problems as bitcoin plummets

FILE PHOTO: Illumination of the stock graph is seen on the representations of virtual currency Bitcoin in this picture illustration taken taken March 13, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo

LONDON (Reuters) – Cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase said on Thursday its retail and professional-focused platforms were hit by tech problems, with users reporting difficulty trading as bitcoin plunged towards its biggest one-day drop since September.

California-based Coinbase said on its website at 14:14 GMT it was investigating connectivity problems, adding at 14:42 GMT that it had identified the problem and implemented a solution.

In a separate post at 15:21 GMT on its Coinbase Pro site it said “increased latencies impacting order entry and settlement” for its Coinbase Pro service, adding it was investigating the problem.

A spokesman for Coinbase, one of the biggest cryptocurrency exchanges, declined to comment.

Coinbase users on Twitter reported problems trading.

One Coinbase Pro user told Reuters by message:

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Is Amazon Web Services Down? Roku, Adobe, Others Experience Problems

Amazon Web Services saw an outage Wednesday that caused problems for several companies. In a statement, Amazon said it was specifically having problems with its service that processes large streams of data. 

“We continue to work towards recovery of the issue affecting the Kinesis Data Streams API in the US-EAST-1 Region. We also continue to see an improvement in error rates for Kinesis and several affected services, but expect full recovery to still take up to a few hours,” the statement said. 

“The issue continues to also affect other services, or parts of these services, that utilize Kinesis Data Streams within their workflows. While features of multiple services are impacted, some services have seen broader impact and service-specific impact details are below. We continue to work towards full recovery.” 

Amazon Web Services is the company’s cloud storage business that many high-profile companies use. 

Many companies including the Baltimore Sun and

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iPhone 12 Problems Confirmed, Powerful iPhone Leaks, Your New Magical MacBook

Taking a look back at another week of news and headlines from Cupertino, this week’s Apple Loop includes iPhone 12 audio problems, a powerful iPhone 13 leak, reviews of the new MacBook Air and MacBook Pro laptops, the power of the M1 chip, macOS Big Sur bricking older Macs, the lower App Store commission rate, Apple settling iPhone throttling case, and the M1 takes on the first ARM chip…

Apple Loop is here to remind you of a few of the very many discussions that have happened around Apple over the last seven days (and you can read my weekly digest of Android news here on Forbes).

iPhone 12 Audio Issues Confirmed By Apple

From the iPhone 12 Mini to the iPhone 12 Pro Max, Apple’s latest iPhone family has been picking up critical acclaim. But faults and flaws have also been noticed, from issues with the MagSafe charger to

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New drug can improve fertility in women with reproductive health problems — ScienceDaily

A drug that acts via the natural ‘kisspeptin’ hormone system in the body has the potential to treat reproductive health problems in women, according to a new study.

Twenty-four women were injected with a drug called MVT-602 which targets the kisspeptin system to stimulate reproductive hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation.

The naturally occurring form of kisspeptin called kisspeptin-54 (KP54) has been researched for a number of years to treat reproductive disorders, but in the new study, MVT-602 induced more potent signalling of the kisspeptin system over a longer period of time than KP54.

The researchers behind the study suggest that MVT-602 may be used to effectively treat a range of reproductive conditions that affect fertility such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) — a common condition that affects how a woman’s ovaries work and hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) — a condition where a woman’s periods stop.

The researchers suggest

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Apple’s app-security tech Gatekeeper caused all kinds of problems last week, but here’s why your Mac would be in far worse shape without it



a screenshot of a computer: macOS Big Sur. Apple


© Provided by Business Insider
macOS Big Sur. Apple

  • The surge of downloads for Apple’s latest version of macOS Big Sur caused an issue with Apple’s servers that triggered a bug in the company’s Gatekeeper.
  • Gatekeeper is the service that confirms that a piece of software is legitimate before it’s downloaded — when it stopped working, apps didn’t open.
  • Gatekeeper, and its failure, can be an annoyance for those who don’t want Apple regulating what they download, but most people would argue it’s better to be safe than sorry.
  • “Security always includes a tradeoff between convenience and protecting a user, sometimes from themselves,” says columnist Jason Aten.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Last week, as Apple users upgraded to the latest version of macOS Big Sur, the surge of downloads caused an issue with Apple’s servers that triggered a bug in the company’s Gatekeeper. That may not sound

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AliveCor raises $65 million to detect heart problems with AI

AliveCor, a startup developing algorithms that detect atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, tachycardia, and other health issues from heart rate readings, today raised $65 million in funding. The company says the proceeds will be used to bolster go-to-market efforts as AliveCor kicks off a partnership with Omron to provide at-home blood pressure monitoring tech to customers.

Over the past few months, in response to the pandemic, companies like Current Health and Twistle have teamed up with the Providence and other health care providers to pilot at-home COVID-19-tracking platforms. Beyond the pandemic, investors see lots of potential in digital biomarker monitoring for telehealth. In a case in point, Healx raised $56 million to further develop its AI platform that seeks new drug treatments for rare diseases. Elsewhere, Viz.ai recently secured $50 million for AI that detects early signs of stroke, and Verisim Life closed a $5.2 million seed round to create AI-powered biosimulations

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can the public help solve our biggest problems?

It is hard not to feel a thrill of excitement when you land on the Galaxy Zoo homepage and read the words “Few have witnessed what you’re about to see” looming out of a star-strewn black background.

The anticipation is justified when, in five quick clicks, you’re asked to classify a galaxy as part of an online crowdsourcing astronomy project. The project is hosted on Zooniverse, a platform that aims to make cutting-edge research accessible to everyone.

“Galaxy Zoo was one of the first projects that showed the amount of enthusiasm there was out there to participate in science,” says co-founder Chris Lintott, the professor of astrophysics and citizen science lead at the University of Oxford. “It was supposed to be a side-project for me – now we have more than 80 crowdsourcing projects like it on Zooniverse, more than 2 million registered volunteers, and [we’ve had] our busiest year

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The rise of citizen science: can the public help solve our biggest problems? | Universities

It is hard not to feel a thrill of excitement when you land on the Galaxy Zoo homepage and read the words “Few have witnessed what you’re about to see” looming out of a star-strewn black background.

The anticipation is justified when, in five quick clicks, you’re asked to classify a galaxy as part of an online crowdsourcing astronomy project. The project is hosted on Zooniverse, a platform that aims to make cutting-edge research accessible to everyone.

“Galaxy Zoo was one of the first projects that showed the amount of enthusiasm there was out there to participate in science,” says co-founder Chris Lintott, the professor of astrophysics and citizen science lead at the University of Oxford. “It was supposed to be a side-project for me – now we have more than 80 crowdsourcing projects like it on Zooniverse, more than 2 million registered volunteers, and [we’ve had] our busiest

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