Intel unveils its second-generation quantum computing control chip

Intel unveiled its second-generation quantum computing control chip during its Intel Labs virtual event today. The chip, codenamed Horse Ridge II, is another milestone toward making quantum computing — one of the holy grails of computing — more practical. The new prototype builds on the first-generation Horse Ridge controller introduced in 2019. Horse Ridge II has more capability and higher levels of integration to control a quantum computer, which remains a long-term goal for the company.

At the outset of the project, Intel’s researchers designed the scalable system-on-chip (SOC) to operate at cryogenic temperatures, simplifying the control electronics and interconnects required to elegantly scale and operate large quantum computing systems. Most quantum computing systems only really works at near-freezing temperatures. Intel is trying to change that, but in the meantime, the control chip eliminates having to run hundreds of wires into a refrigerated case that houses the quantum computer.

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Intel upgrades quantum computer ambitions with new control chip

Intel's Horse Ridge 2 chip, packaged in this metal housing, is designed to simplify communications between a quantum processor and conventional computers.

Intel’s Horse Ridge 2 chip, packaged in this metal housing, is designed to simplify communications between a quantum processor and conventional computers.


Intel

Intel unveiled on Thursday its Horse Ridge 2 processor for controlling quantum computers, an important milestone in making the potentially revolutionary machines practical.

The Horse Ridge 2 isn’t a quantum processor itself but is designed to solve the challenges of communicating with future quantum processors with thousands or more qubits. The processor is the second generation of a family that debuted in 2019.

The processor comes as Intel endeavors to catch up with quantum computer rivals like IBM and Google. The chipmaker hopes it eventually will leapfrog the competition with processors housing vastly more qubits, the data processing element fundamental to quantum computers, than its competitors have. Horse Ridge 2

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IBM aims for quantum computing safe encryption, security tools

IBM Cloud said it will offer cryptography technology that will be futureproofed for quantum computing deployments.

Big Blue, which is among the key players in the quantum computing race, launched Quantum Safe Cryptography for Key Management and Application Transactions.

Quantum computing promises to solve new problems, leap past supercomputers and possibly used to easily break encryption algorithms and data security measures.

IBM’s bet is that it can combine its security and hybrid cloud knowhow with its quantum computing research.

The new tools under the quantum-safe effort from IBM include:

  • Quantum Safe Crypto Support, a service to secure data transmissions between hardware externally and internally via a quantum-safe algorithm.
  • Extended IBM Cloud Hyper Protect Crypto Service, a design to protect transactional data within applications. The protection covers encryption schemes in databases and digital signature validation.

These services will support the following:

  • IBM Key Protect and for Red Hat OpenShift on IBM
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Global Quantum Technology Market 2020 Key Players Data, Revenue, Future Development, Trend and Competitive Landscape Analysis by 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 29, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
Global Quantum Technology Market 2020 by Company, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 describes an in-depth evaluation and the essential aspects of the market presenting information regarding the emerging opportunities in the market. The report offers an analysis of market factors, industry trends, market dynamics, leading players, and their limitations. The report provides an overview of market definitions, scope, application, segmentation, share, revenue status and outlook, market drivers, production status, and outlook. The report displays emerging trends along with major drivers, challenges, and opportunities in the global Quantum Technology market. Market share data are available at global and regional levels. Analysts understand the competitive forces and provide competitive analysis for each competitor separately. Key segments covered in this report: geography segment, end use/application segment, and competitor segment.

For

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Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier — ScienceDaily

The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL researchers in the i-sense McKendry group.

Paper-based lateral flow tests work the same way as a pregnancy test in that a strip of paper is soaked in a fluid sample and a change in colour — or fluorescent signal — indicates a positive result and the detection of virus proteins or DNA. They are widely used to detect viruses ranging from HIV to SARS-CoV-2 (lateral flow tests for Covid-19 are currently being piloted across England) and can provide a rapid diagnosis, as the results do not have to be processed in a lab.

The new research, published in Nature, found that low-cost nanodiamonds could be used to signal the presence of an HIV disease marker

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Quantum magic squares cannot be as easily characterized as their ‘classical’ cousins — ScienceDaily

Magic squares belong to the imagination of humanity for a long time. The oldest known magic square comes from China and is over 2000 years old. One of the most famous magic squares can be found in Albrecht Dürer’s copper engraving Melencolia I. Another one is on the facade of the Sagrada Família in Barcelona. A magic square is a square of numbers such that every column and every row sums to the same number. For example, in the magic square of the Sagrada Família every row and column sums to 33.

If the magic square can contain real numbers, and every row and column sums to 1, then it is called a doubly stochastic matrix. One particular example would be a matrix that has 0’s everywhere except for one 1 in every column and every row. This is called a permutation matrix. A famous theorem says that every doubly

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NPL and Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC) collaborate in quantum computing

LONDON, Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) are working with Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC) to accelerate research and development to support the commercialisation and optimisation of their quantum technologies, such as IronBridge™, and help with the characterisation of photonic components. This includes the metrology of emerging ultra-low loss optical connectors, for example, to meet the exacting requirements of IEC standards for improving the efficiency of quantum optical networks.

CQC’s IronBridge™ is a photonic quantum device, built to provide high grade entropy to be used for post-quantum encryption algorithms, cached entropy generation for IoT devices, key generation for certificates, quantum watermarking and many other use cases in cybersecurity, science, engineering, finance and gaming by utilising verifiable quantum randomness.

NPL is the UK’s National Metrology Institute and home to the Quantum Metrology Institute, which brings together NPL’s cutting-edge quantum science and metrology research and provides the

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Direct visualization of quantum dots reveals shape of quantum wave function — ScienceDaily

Trapping and controlling electrons in bilayer graphene quantum dots yields a promising platform for quantum information technologies. Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now achieved the first direct visualization of quantum dots in bilayer graphene, revealing the shape of the quantum wave function of the trapped electrons.

The results, published November 23 in Nano Letters, provide important fundamental knowledge needed to develop quantum information technologies based on bilayer graphene quantum dots.

“There has been a lot of work to develop this system for quantum information science, but we’ve been missing an understanding of what the electrons look like in these quantum dots,” said corresponding author Jairo Velasco Jr., assistant professor of physics at UC Santa Cruz.

While conventional digital technologies encode information in bits represented as either 0 or 1, a quantum bit, or qubit, can represent both states at the same time due to quantum superposition. In theory,

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Researchers minimize quantum backaction in thermodynamic systems via entangled measurement

Researchers minimize quantum backaction in thermodynamic systems via entangled measurement
Conceptual design of the quantum work and its experimental realization. Credit: Wu Kangda et al.

Led by academician Prof. Guo Guangcan from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Prof. Li Chuanfeng’s group and Prof. Xiang Guoyong’s group from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), CAS, in cooperation with theoretical physicists from Germany, Italy and Switzerland, conducted the first experiment using entangled collective measurement for minimizing quantum measurement backaction based on photonic system.


The result was published online in Physical Review Letters on Nov. 16.

When an observable object is measured twice on an evolving coherent quantum system, the first measurement usually changes the statistical information of the second measurement because the first measurement broke the quantum coherence of the system, which is called measurement backaction.

A former theoretical work of Dr. Martí Perarnau Llobet in 2017 pointed out that, without violating the basic requirements of quantum thermodynamics, measurement

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Scientists make sound-waves from a quantum vacuum at the Black Hole laboratory — ScienceDaily

Researchers have developed a new theory for observing a quantum vacuum that could lead to new insights into the behaviour of black holes.

The Unruh effect combines quantum physics and the theory of relativity. So far it has not been possible to measure or observe it, but now new research from a team led by the University of Nottingham has shed light on how this could be achieved using sound particles. The team’s research has been published today in the journal Physical Review Letters.

The Unruh effect suggests that if you fly through a quantum vacuum with extreme acceleration, the vacuum no longer looks like a vacuum: rather, it looks like a warm bath full of particles. This phenomenon is closely related to the Hawking radiation from black holes.

A research team from the University of Nottingham’s Black Hole Laboratory in collaboration with University of British Columbia and Vienna

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