U.S. should look at how other high-income countries regulate health care costs, experts urge — ScienceDaily

Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States’ health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study.

The study, published in the journal Health Affairs, examined how other high-income countries that use a fee-for-service model regulate health care costs.

Although the United States has the highest health care prices in the world, the specific mechanisms commonly used by other countries to set and update prices are often overlooked. In most countries with universal health insurance, physicians are paid on a fee-for-service basis, yet health care prices there are lower than in the U.S. To lower health care spending, American policymakers have focused on eliminating fee-for-service reimbursement, which provides an incentive for performing additional services rather than setting up price negotiations to address the main factor that drives health care spending.

U.S. policy

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Genes that give plant nucleus its shape discovered, also regulate copper tolerance — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have identified how the architecture of the cell nucleus can change gene activity in plants. This discovery reveals fundamental knowledge about genome regulation and points towards future methods for potentially manipulating the expression of many genes simultaneously.

The long strands of DNA and the protein machinery needed to turn gene expression on or off are contained, floating within the nuclei of cells. The nucleus is essentially a sack made of a flexible, double-membrane envelope that is supported by an inner, fine-mesh frame of proteins called the nuclear lamina.

“DNA does not drift aimlessly within the nucleus. We expect that there is nonrandom spatial positioning of genes around the nuclear lamina,” said Professor Sachihiro Matsunaga who led the research project from the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, recently published in Nature Communications.

Gene regulation is often studied at the one-dimensional level

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This A.I. CEO says if governments don’t regulate technology, we will live in a ‘very scary place’

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Thomas Siebel wearing a suit and tie: C3.ai CEO Tom Siebel on Leadership Next podcast


© Courtesy of C3.ai
C3.ai CEO Tom Siebel on Leadership Next podcast

Tom Siebel, long-time Silicon Valley investor and the CEO of C3.ai, has first-hand knowledge of the capacity of artificial intelligence, both to create “goodness and light” and to make the world “a very scary place.” On the latest episode of “Leadership Next,” Siebel shared with hosts Alan Murray and Ellen McGirt his views on technology regulation.

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“If government does not regulate we will be sorry,” he said. And that’s coming from someone who claims he isn’t “really a big government guy.”

Particularly in the use of A.I. for human systems, Siebel is wary of over-dependence on machine learning. The use of the technology is inevitable, he said, but the possibility for introducing and worsening

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