Pompeii ruins unearth ‘master and slave’ remains

The grisly remains of a master and his slave in their final death throes have been discovered amid the ruins of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.

The skeletal remains of what are believed to have been a rich man and his male slave attempting to escape death were found during excavations in the Civita Giuliana area.

Parts of the skulls and bones of the two men were found near a cryptoporticus, or covered gallery, of an ancient villa. Casts of the skeletons have been made, according to the Archaeological Park of Pompeii.

SHOCKING POMPEII DISCOVERY: EXPERTS FIND EVIDENCE OF NEURONS IN VESUVIUS VICTIM

Pompeii officials said the men apparently escaped the initial fall of ash from Mount Vesuvius, then succumbed to a powerful volcanic blast that took place the next morning. The later blast “apparently invaded the area from many points, surrounding and burying the victims in ash,” Pompeii

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Apple remains ‘fully committed’ to privacy features like anti-tracking in iOS 14 [u]

Apple remains committed to implementing anti-tracking features in iOS 14 and further privacy improvements down the road, the company’s privacy chief said in a letter.

The iOS 14 feature, dubbed App Tracking Transparency (ATT), makes cross-app and website tracking opt-in, and gives users additional information and context. In September, Apple delayed the rollout of the privacy feature until 2021.

Shortly after Apple announced the delay, a coalition of digital civil rights groups penned a letter expressing their “disappointment” that it wouldn’t be available during the initial iOS 14 rollout. On Nov. 19, Apple sent a letter back in response.

“We delayed the release of ATT to early next year to give developers the time they indicated they needed to properly update their systems and data practices, but we remain fully committed to ATT and to our expansive approach to privacy protections,” wrote Jane C. Horvath, Apple’s Senior Director of Global

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Mysterious remains of ancient flying reptile found hidden among shark fossils

flying

A type of North African pterosaur, believed to be similar to the one uncovered by the University of Portsmouth researchers.


Davide Bonadonna

Combing through a drawer of shark fossils early this year, British doctoral student Roy Smith made a surprising and thrilling discovery: remains of a flying reptile that lived more than 60 million years ago. 

Smith, a Ph.D. candidate at the UK’s University of Portsmouth, was examining fossils of shark fin spines from two British museum collections when he noticed some fragments contained neural foramina, or tiny but perceptible holes where nerves come to the surface to sense prey. Sharks fin spines don’t have these, so Smith instantly knew some of the fragments weren’t like the others. 

In fact, they didn’t even come from creatures of the sea, but from creatures of the air: toothless pterosaurs, an enigmatic flying reptile and the earliest vertebrates known to have evolved powered

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A female hunter’s remains hint at more fluid gender roles in the early Americas

Women in early hunter-gatherer groups regularly hunted big game alongside their male peers, indicates a study published on November 4 in the journal Science Advances. Researchers excavated a 9,000-year-old partial skeleton in the Andes buried with hunting tools and determined that the remains belonged to a young woman. The team also pored over previous reports of human remains from this time period, and found numerous other examples of women in North and South America buried with tools used in big-game hunting.



a person jumping up in the air on a beach: A number of researchers have speculated that some ancient societies might have had a more equal division of labor.


© Provided by Popular Science
A number of researchers have speculated that some ancient societies might have had a more equal division of labor.

“This was really surprising to us…given our understanding of the world, which was that in hunter-gatherer societies males hunt and females gather or process subsistence resources,” says Randall Haas, an archaeologist at the University of California, Davis. In more recent and contemporary hunter-gatherer societies,

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Verizon’s 4.4% Dividend Yield Remains One of the Best in Tech

Though shares have turned in an unimpressive negative 6% return this year, Verizon‘s (NYSE:VZ) business has been a stable staple. That was on display once again in Q3 2020, with net new wireless subscriber additions and the highest rate of Fios Internet additions since 2014. But the big news — another double-digit percentage increase in free cash flow — underpins the real reason to own this stock: the 4.4% dividend yield. 

A city skyline with a bubble that has "5G" in hovering above.

Image source: Getty Images.

Wireless is a modern necessity

New 5G wireless networks have been all the rage this year, and on this front Verizon trails behind T-Mobile (NASDAQ:TMUS) in terms of national coverage. However, its 4G LTE network outperforms other carriers’ new 5G in average performance.

It shows in the numbers. Verizon added net 136,000 retail postpaid connections on the consumer side, net 417,000 retail postpaid connections in the business segment, and net 144,000 Fios Internet additions

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