$100,000 By 2021 Possible, Morgan Creek Co-Founder Reveals Why

KEY POINTS

  • Large companies like Square and PayPal are reportedly eating up new Bitcoin supply
  • Pompliano said the current microenvironment is “rocket fuel” for Bitcoin
  • The only way for supply and demand to equilibrate is at a higher price, he said

With Bitcoin just a few amount below its previous all-time, Anthony Pompliano, the founder of Morgan Creek Capital, said he wouldn’t be surprised to see the benchmark cryptocurrency at a price point of $100,000 by the end of 2021.

Pompliano, whose company assists companies and foundations in investing in blockchain technology, told CNBC the current supply issuance of Bitcoin wouldn’t be able to keep up with the increasing demand from various sectors. 

The recent Bitcoin halving reduced the supply issuance to 900 BTC per day. In today’s environment, this is severely limited because big companies such as Square and PayPal are reportedly buying 100% of these newly mined Bitcoins.

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Fossil Reveals ‘Buck-toothed Toucan’ That Lived With Dinosaurs

The discovery of a creature described as resembling a “buck-toothed toucan” that lived some 68 million years ago has upended assumptions about diversity in the birds that lived alongside dinosaurs.

At less than nine centimetres (3.5 inches) long, the delicate skull of the bird scientists have dubbed Falcatakely forsterae might be easily overlooked.

In fact, it almost was, sitting in a backlog of excavated fossils for years before CT scanning suggested the specimen deserved more attention.

It turns out that its tall, scythe-like beak, while resembling the toucan, is something never before seen in the fossil record.

Birds in the Mesozoic era — between 250 million and 65 million years ago — had “relatively unspecialised snouts”, Patrick O’Connor, lead author of a study on the new creature, told AFP.

“Falcatakely just changed the game completely, documenting a long, high beak unlike anything known in the Mesozoic,” added O’Connor, professor of

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For the first time, scientists detect the ghostly signal that reveals the engine of the universe

In research published Wednesday in the journal Nature, scientists reported that they’ve made the first detection of almost-ethereal particles called neutrinos that can be traced to carbon-nitrogen-oxygen fusion, known as the CNO cycle, inside the sun.

It’s a landmark finding that confirms theoretical predictions from the 1930s, and it’s being hailed as one of the greatest discoveries in physics of the new millenium.

“It’s really a breakthrough for solar and stellar physics,” said Gioacchino Ranucci of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), one of the researchers on the project since it began in 1990.

The scientists used the ultrasensitive Borexino detector at the INFN’s Gran Sasso particle physics laboratory in central Italy – the largest underground research center in the world, deep beneath the Apennine Mountains, about 65 miles northeast of Rome.

The detection caps off decades of study of the sun’s neutrinos by the Borexino project, and

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Experimental evolution reveals how bacteria gain drug resistance — ScienceDaily

A research team at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan has succeeded in experimentally evolving the common bacteria Escherichia coli under pressure from a large number of individual antibiotics. In doing so, they were able to identify the mechanisms and constraints underlying evolved drug resistance. Their findings, published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, can be used to help develop drug-treatment strategies that minimize the chance that bacteria will develop resistance.

Counteracting multidrug-resistant bacteria is becoming a critical global challenge. It seems that every time we develop new antibiotics, novel antibiotic-resistant bacteria emerge during clinical use. To win this cat-and-mouse game, we must understand how drug resistance evolves in bacteria. Naturally, this process is very complicated, involving numerous changes in genome sequences and cellular states. Therefore, a comprehensive study of resistance dynamics for large numbers of antibiotics has never been reported.

“Laboratory evolution combined with

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RNAI Technology Market Size, Share reveals significant growth through 2022

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 24, 2020 (AmericaNewsHour) —
Kenneth Research published a report on ‘RNAI TECHNOLOGY MARKET’ recently which gives a comprehensive insight into the current RNAI Technology Market environment. The report provides an in-depth analysis of the RNAI Technology Market on the basis of size, volume, and compound annual growth rate (CAGR) during the forecast period, i.e., 2020-2022.

According to WHO, the true state of health of a population is revealed by Healthy Life Expectancy (HALE). HALE not only considers the number of years a person lives, but also if they lived in good health. Between 2000 and 2016, HALE increased globally from 59 years to 63 years which is a growth of 8%. Around USD 7.5 trillion is spent globally on healthcare each year and to achieve targets for primary health care, an additional investment of USD 200

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Direct visualization of quantum dots reveals shape of quantum wave function — ScienceDaily

Trapping and controlling electrons in bilayer graphene quantum dots yields a promising platform for quantum information technologies. Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now achieved the first direct visualization of quantum dots in bilayer graphene, revealing the shape of the quantum wave function of the trapped electrons.

The results, published November 23 in Nano Letters, provide important fundamental knowledge needed to develop quantum information technologies based on bilayer graphene quantum dots.

“There has been a lot of work to develop this system for quantum information science, but we’ve been missing an understanding of what the electrons look like in these quantum dots,” said corresponding author Jairo Velasco Jr., assistant professor of physics at UC Santa Cruz.

While conventional digital technologies encode information in bits represented as either 0 or 1, a quantum bit, or qubit, can represent both states at the same time due to quantum superposition. In theory,

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iPhone 12 Pro Max teardown reveals a truly huge main camera

It’s no secret that Apple’s iPhone 12 Pro Max boasts a larger main camera, but it’s now clear just how enormous that sensor really is. iFixit has posted a teardown of the iPhone 12 Pro Max that illustrates the camera size in vivid detail. While the cam itself is visibly larger, it’s the sensor-shift stabilization that puts it over the top — the full unit makes the regular 12 Pro’s main shooter look dainty by comparison. Apple might have needed to make “compromises” to stuff that camera into the smaller phone, iFixit said.



a hand holding a cell phone: Apple iPhone 12 Pro Max teardown with camera removed


Apple iPhone 12 Pro Max teardown with camera removed

Many other parts are larger, too. It’s not surprising that the battery is the largest for any current iPhone at 14.13Wh (albeit smaller than the 15.04Wh from the 11 Pro Max). However, the speaker and Taptic Engine are also huge, at least compared to the compact parts inside

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Folding of SARS-CoV2 genome reveals drug targets — and preparation for ‘SARS-CoV3’ — ScienceDaily

For the first time, an international research alliance has observed the RNA folding structures of the SARS-CoV2 genome with which the virus controls the infection process. Since these structures are very similar among various beta corona viruses, the scientists not only laid the foundation for the targeted development of novel drugs for treating COVID-19, but also for future occurrences of infection with new corona viruses that may develop in the future.

The genetic code of the SARS-CoV2 virus is exactly 29,902 characters long, strung through a long RNA molecule. It contains the information for the production of 27 proteins. This is not much compared to the possible 40,000 kinds of protein that a human cell can produce. Viruses, however, use the metabolic processes of their host cells to multiply. Crucial to this strategy is that viruses can precisely control the synthesis of their own proteins.

SARS-CoV2 uses the spatial folding

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Apple’s Craig Federighi and Johny Srouji Describe the Genesis of the M1 Chip while Microsoft Reveals their own ‘Pluton’ Processor

 

Yesterday Patently Apple posted a report titled “Apple goes on a Media Blitz to Defend their coming iOS 14 Privacy App that is currently under attack by Advertisers & Facebook.” Both Apple’s Jane C. Horvath, Senior Director, Global Privacy and Craig Federighi, Apple’s SVP of Software Engineering took their stance on privacy public big time as they begin to prepare for an antitrust lawsuit filed by the very ad forces want to kill Apple’s iOS 14 “App Tracking Transparency,” feature set to launch in early 2021.

 

Hours after our report, an article by Ars Technica surfaced focusing on the story behind Apple’s new M1 processor that caused a stir when Apple’s SVP Software Craig Federighi caused a bit of a stir about the possibility of Windows running natively on the M1. How realistic is that is that possibility? We briefly touch on that later in the report. 

 

To be sure

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Scientific analysis of an ancient portrait pigment reveals long-lost artistic details — ScienceDaily

How much information can you get from a speck of purple pigment, no bigger than the diameter of a hair, plucked from an Egyptian portrait that’s nearly 2,000 years old? Plenty, according to a new study. Analysis of that speck can teach us about how the pigment was made, what it’s made of — and maybe even a little about the people who made it. The study is published in the International Journal of Ceramic Engineering and Science.

“We’re very interested in understanding the meaning and origin of the portraits, and finding ways to connect them and come up with a cultural understanding of why they were even painted in the first place,” says materials scientist Darryl Butt, co-author of the study and dean of the College of Mines and Earth Sciences.

Faiyum mummies

The portrait that contained the purple pigment came from an Egyptian mummy, but it doesn’t

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