Russia says data on Sputnik Covid vaccine shows 95% efficacy

Russia has said that its coronavirus vaccine had more than 95% efficacy according to new preliminary data, giving it a success rate comparable to vaccines being developed by Pfizer and Moderna.The country also said claimed it had greater efficacy than the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine because of Russia’s proprietary technology, which it offered to share with British scientists.



a hand holding a bottle: Photograph: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images


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Photograph: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images



a close up of a hand holding a bottle: Kirill Dmitriev, who has been tasked with selling the vaccine abroad, said on Tuesday that a dose would cost about $10 on international markets about half the cost of the Pfizer vaccine.


© Photograph: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images
Kirill Dmitriev, who has been tasked with selling the vaccine abroad, said on Tuesday that a dose would cost about $10 on international markets about half the cost of the Pfizer vaccine.

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An Ex-Trump Insider Looks to Our Future With Russia and China

Unfortunately, McMaster’s boss was not on board with this approach. In McMaster’s time, he notes, President Trump often said improving relations with Russia “would be a good thing, not a bad thing,” while succumbing to Putin’s flattery and treating his criminal actions “with dismissiveness and moral equivalency.” And, of course, the repeated references to “the Russia hoax,” which meant no one in the president’s circle could discuss election interference without dreading an eruption triggered by Trump’s fear that the legitimacy of the election was being questioned.

McMaster never deals head-on with the fundamental problem — that the administration had, on paper, a defensible Russia strategy, and the president kept undermining it. Instead, he cites his top Russia aide, Fiona Hill, who, he writes, always warned that “Putin seeks to divide; Americans and Europeans should not divide themselves.”

China, the climate-changer, is, of course, immune to containment strategies. If the old

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NATO to set up new space center amid China, Russia concerns

KESTER, Belgium (AP) — To a few of the locals, the top-secret, fenced-off installation on the hill is known as “the radar station.” Some folks claim to have seen mysterious Russians in the area. Over the years, rumors have swirled that it might be a base for U.S. nuclear warheads.

It’s easy to see how the rumors start. The site is visually striking. Four huge white Kevlar balls sit like giant spherical spacecraft in a compound in the middle of open farm country 25 kilometers (16 miles) west of Belgium’s capital, Brussels.

But the Kester Satellite Ground Station is both safer and more sophisticated than local lore might suggest. It’s central to space communications at NATO — the biggest and most modern of four such stations the military alliance runs.

Around 2,000 satellites orbit the earth, over half operated by NATO countries, ensuring everything from mobile phone and banking services

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