In Wi-Fi ‘Dead Zones,’ Rural Students Can’t Log On to Virtual School

Shekinah and Orlandria Lennon were sitting at their kitchen table this fall, taking online classes, when video of their teachers and fellow students suddenly froze on their laptop screens. The wireless antenna on the roof had stopped working, and it could not be fixed.

Desperate for a solution, their mother called five broadband companies, trying to get connections for their home in Orrum, N.C., a rural community of fewer than 100 people with no grocery store or traffic lights.

All the companies gave the same answer: Service is not available in your area.

The response is the same across broad stretches of Robeson County, N.C., a swath of small towns and rural places like Orrum dotted among soybean fields and hog farms on the South Carolina border. About 20,000 of the county’s homes, or 43 percent of all households, have no internet connection.

The technology gap has prompted teachers to

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Liberty Science Center, Hudson County Schools of Technology Reach Agreement on Innovative High School Collaboration

JERSEY CITY, NJ – Liberty Science Center has come to an agreement with the Hudson County Schools of Technology to establish a unique public-private partnership for the creation of the new proposed Liberty Science High School, located within the new cutting-edge SciTech Scity. The planned 30-acre innovation campus, a “mini city of the future”, will be a revolutionary technological hub for students, innovators, entrepreneurs, and scientists working together to create a community for learning and innovation.

The state-of-the-art school will be built in Jersey City next to Liberty Science Center and will include a robust set of skill-centric classes for students in grades 9-12. Under the new collaboration, the Hudson County Schools of Technology (HCST) will oversee operations at the new public county magnet high school to provide 400 science-talented high school students from across Hudson County with a unique opportunity for a curriculum centered on science, technology, engineering, and

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Man caught on camera burglarizing Kenner elementary school, police say | Crime/Police

Investigators are trying to identify a man accused of burglarizing a Kenner elementary school. 

The suspect slipped into Audubon Elementary, 200 W. Loyola Drive, about 6:45 a.m. on Oct. 21, said Lt. Michael Cunningham, a spokesman for the Kenner Police Department. 

A Michigan man accused of threatening to kill relatives of a 10-year-old girl who had accused the man’s brothers of raping her has been arrest…

School officials discovered the break-in when an employee arrived at work later that morning and realized someone had been rummaging around in her office. 

Police officers reviewed surveillance video and spotted the unidentified man entering the building after the doors had been unlocked for the day but before students and staff arrived, Cunningham said. 

The man entered several offices, picking up a laptop and a computer joystick, according to authorities. He eventually left behind the laptop but took the joystick, hurrying off just minutes

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Jersey City unveils new science school plan at innovation campus

Jersey City is moving forward with a new high school in its SciTech
Scity, a planned 30-acre innovation campus around the Liberty Science Center.

The new Liberty Science High School will be developed by the
city in partnership with Liberty Science Center (LSC) and Hudson County Board
of Education in what’s being hailed as a “mini city of the future”, with a
technological hub for students, innovators, entrepreneurs, and scientists to work
together.

 The state-of-the-art
school will include a set of skill-centric classes for students in grades 9-12.
The Hudson County Schools of Technology (HCST) will oversee operations at the
new public county magnet high school to provide 400 science-talented high school
students from across Hudson County with an opportunity for a curriculum
centered on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) that will
leverage a work education program around the 200+ technology startup companies
and entrepreneurs that will call SciTech

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Michelle Sabick Appointed Dean of the Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science

Michelle Sabick

Michelle Sabick has been named the new dean of the Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Denver. She will begin her new role on March 1, 2021. Most recently, Sabick served as the as dean of the Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology at Saint Louis University (SLU).

An expert in the biomechanics of the shoulder and elbow, medical device development, and engineering education, Sabick received her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Iowa. She worked at several of Colorado’s top educational and medical institutions, including as an affiliate and adjunct faculty member at Colorado State University and the Colorado School of Mines, and as senior staff scientist at the world-renowned Steadman Hawkins Sports Medicine Foundation in Vail.

“Dr. Sabick brings to the University of Denver exceptional leadership skills, a commitment to the future of research, teaching, and learning in the engineering

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When teens host parties, some school districts return to remote learning. But does the science support that?

“This isn’t just a school conversation,” he wrote. “This is a community conversation. And the bottom line is that what we don’t know about this situation absolutely CAN hurt us.”

However, the decision to close a school without any evidence of coronavirus transmission within the building appears to contradict the guidance laid out by state education officials this summer and updated on Friday. Though more than 1,100 cases among students and staff have been reported in school buildings as of Wednesday, Governor Charlie Baker and Massachusetts education leaders have repeatedly said there’s been no evidence of coronavirus transmissions happening in schools.

Baker has been hesitant to directly criticize individual communities where parties have been held, including Marblehead. Asked during a press conference Friday how he felt about schools that temporarily close after parties are held, he said “local communities need to make their own call with respect to how they

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Smithtown High School West wins grant to develop technology to help kids with autism

SMITHTOWN, Long Island (WABC) — Thirteen high schools across the United States have been selected to receive a prestigious $10,000 grant celebrating outstanding innovation and invention, and one of them is from New York.

Smithtown High School West was selected as a Lemelson-MIT InvenTeam and will spend the next nine months developing a Personal Distance Monitor that is designed to help children with autism manage their personal space.

InvenTeams are teams of high school students, teachers, and mentors who receive grants to invent technological solutions to real-world problems.

Also Read: Police officer helps non-verbal child with autism

The initiative of the Lemelson-MIT Program aims to inspire a new generation of inventors to pursue creative lives and careers through invention.

“The InvenTeams program represents the future,” said Leigh Estabrooks, invention education officer from the Lemelson-MIT Program. “We place an emphasis on STEM-focused projects to develop interest in these fields among youth.

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NC School of Science and Math student collaborate at a distance to win competitions during the pandemic :: WRAL.com

Last June, a student team from the North Carolina School of Science and Math was among 5 national winners of the annual “Samsung Solving Problems for Tomorrow” competition.

Solving problems using their STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) experience is their passion. It was last January when their team was among three in the state and 200 across the country still hoping to be among the top 5 teams that would each earn a prize worth $100,000.

The team, led by seniors Jason Li and Dalia Segal-Miller, developed an app that uses artificial intelligence to help people separate recyclables.

Holding an average thermos with a metal container and plastic lid, Li explained how the app works. The phone’s video function scans the metal surface. “It will classify as metal with about an 80% accuracy,” he said.

There were three North Carolina student teams who made it to the second stage

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Poor nutrition in school years may have created 20 cm height gap across nations — ScienceDaily

A new global analysis led by Imperial College London, and published in journal The Lancet, has assessed the height and weight of school-aged children and adolescents across the world.

The study, which used data from 65 million children aged five to 19 years old in 193 countries, revealed that school-aged children’s’ height and weight, which are indicators of their health and quality of their diet, vary enormously around the world.

There was a 20 cm difference between 19-year-olds in the tallest and shortest nations — this represented an eight-year growth gap for girls, and a six-year growth gap for boys. For instance, the study revealed that the average 19-year-old girl in Bangladesh and Guatemala (the nations with the world’s shortest girls) is the same height as an average 11-year-old girl in the Netherlands, the nation with the tallest boys and girls.

The international team behind the study warn that

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Measure RR, L.A. school bond for modernization and technology, headed to victory

Measure RR, which would provide $7 billion for building, repairing and modernizing local public schools, was headed to victory in unofficial final voting results Wednesday morning. To pass, the measure needed 55% of the votes cast within L.A. Unified boundaries, which extend beyond the city of Los Angeles. Ballot totals showed nearly 71% of voters choosing to support the tax measure, well above the needed margin.



a person sitting on top of a wooden fence: Iron worker Pete Perez welds posts at a performing arts building under construction at Cleveland Charter High School in Reseda. A bond measure on Tuesday's ballot to pay for additional school modernization and construction projects has enough votes to win. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)


© (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)
Iron worker Pete Perez welds posts at a performing arts building under construction at Cleveland Charter High School in Reseda. A bond measure on Tuesday’s ballot to pay for additional school modernization and construction projects has enough votes to win. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

“The students are the real winners today — this victory is theirs,” said L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner in a statement Wednesday. “Because of voter support, and the support of labor,

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