Young scientist s named TIME’s first-ever Kid of the Year for technology that leads social change

TIME Magazine has announced its first-ever Kid of the Year – 15-year-old scientist and inventor Gitanjali Rao. 

Roa’s love for science began at the age of 10 when she discovered carbon nanotube sensor technology, which uses molecules to detect chemicals in water, and her passion grew from there.

Prior to being named Kid of the Year, Roa was listed on the Forbes 30 Under 30 List for developing a mobile device in 2017 to test for lead in drinking water – an innovation she made to address the Flint, Michigan water crisis.

Her most recent project is an app called Kindly that uses artificial intelligence to detect cyberbullying online at an early stage.

Roa was selected from a group of more than 5,000 nominees, but judges were astonished by her use of technology to combat a number of social issues ranging from contaminated water to opioid addiction and cyberbullying.

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Computer scientist and community builder

When Charlie Helms decided to major in computer science more than three years ago, he was excited for the possibilities ahead of him.

It seemed like the perfect major to combine his interests in science, math and business. It would even let him tap into his creative side.

Three years later, Helms knows he made the right choice. He’s interned with Cisco, networked with executives at Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan Chase, and in January, he’ll start a full-time job as a program manager at Microsoft.

Helms will graduate from Carolina in December, completing his degree a semester early.

“I feel like in the past three years, I’ve done so much that I feel like I’ve gotten everything out of Carolina that I possibly could have,” said Helms, a native of Spring Lake, North Carolina. “From research, doing internships, to having really amazing friendships, to traveling abroad.”

Initially, though, he

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Scientist who developed quantum computing code wins ORNL’s top science award

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IMAGE: Paul Kent, shown above posing with Summit in April 2018, received the 2020 ORNL Director’s Award for Outstanding Individual Accomplishment in Science and Technology.
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Credit: ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Paul Kent, a computational nanoscience researcher in Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Computing and Computational Science Directorate, received the ORNL Director’s Award for Outstanding Individual Accomplishment in Science and Technology. The award recognizes Kent’s leadership in quantum computing development and application on high-performance computing platforms to help solve major scientific problems.

The Director’s Awards were presented during a livestreamed ceremony by ORNL Director Thomas Zacharia on Friday. The lab’s top awards concluded a two-week period in which category winners were announced daily to laboratory staff. The awards are typically presented at an Awards Night event hosted by UT-Battelle, the management and operating contractor of ORNL for the Department of Energy.

Kent received the lab’s top science and technology

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A ‘Catalyst’ for Growth? Chief Scientist and CEO, June Lai Represents Future for Women in Science & Tech > CEOWORLD magazine

Meet June Lai, the CEO, and scientist behind the high-performance and award-winning manufacturer of protective and stylish smartphone and smart tablet cases, Catalyst.

Consumer technology is no doubt changing, as the race towards mass adoption of artificial intelligence (A.I.), augmented reality (AR), and blockchain technologies continues. But the stories that still go unnoticed are those narratives of how these technologies have come to be.

Every year, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) puts on the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, attracting tens of thousands of consumers from all parts of the world. It’s products galore for the everyday tech enthusiast.

But for CEOs, C-Suite executives, and other badass entrepreneurs, it is a very different experience. In recent years, we have seen an increase of women in technology, which in my opinion, should have been highlighted and emphasized way more than it has been–a story for another time.

Two

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As Australia’s chief scientist, Alan Finkel brought more science into government. His successor Cathy Foley will continue the job

Australia’s chief scientist, Alan Finkel, will bring his five-year stint in the role to a close at the end of 2020. His successor will be Cathy Foley, a physicist and current chief scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the national government research agency.

What legacy will Finkel leave behind? If there’s a defining theme to his time as chief scientist, it must surely be how he has drawn science and evidence more deeply into government policy-making. Among his many achievements in this vein, two key examples leap out.

Bringing scientists to public service

The first is the Australian Science Policy Fellowship pilot program. Based on a hugely successful US scheme run by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, this program recruits brilliant professionals from scientific, technical, engineering and mathematical (STEM) fields and places them in the federal public service. Now in its third successful

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White House taps second controversial scientist to steer major U.S. climate change report

A second Trump political appointee who questions the seriousness of global warming has been assigned a key role in the program that oversees the federal government’s definitive report on climate change.



a fish swimming under water: This enhanced satellite image made available by NOAA shows Tropical Storm Florence, upper left, in the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 11, 2018. (NOAA via AP)


© AP/AP
This enhanced satellite image made available by NOAA shows Tropical Storm Florence, upper left, in the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 11, 2018. (NOAA via AP)

Ryan Maue, the newly installed chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has been detailed to the White House where he will have an oversight role at the U.S. Global Change Research Program, which carries out the climate report.


Trump administration official who questions global warming will run key climate program

Maue’s move was confirmed by two NOAA officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Maue joins climate skeptic David Legates, a meteorologist who claims that excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is good for plants and

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Close to 200 Queen Murder Hornets in Wash. Nest Killed ‘In the Nick of Time,’ Scientist Says

WSDA A new Asian giant hornet ready to emerge

Scientists said they destroyed close to 200 queen murder hornets after discovering a large nest in Washington.

Officials with the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) announced in a press release on Tuesday that the nest they found late last month ultimately contained more than 500 Asian giant hornet specimens in various stages of development.

Among those included 76 queens, which had the potential to start a new colony over the next year, and 108 capped cells with pupae, which were believed to be pupae of new virgin queens, according to the press release.

There were also six combs, 776 cells, six unhatched eggs, 190 larvae, 112 workers and nine drones, which are also known as male hornets, the WSDA said.

“We got there just in the nick of time,” Sven-Erik Spichiger, an entomologist helping kill the murder hornets, said in

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Blue Origin scientist fleshes out plans for lunar cargo delivery

Blue Origin landers
An artist’s conception shows the human landing system that’s being developed by Blue Origin and its industry partners in the foreground, and Blue Origin’s Blue Moon cargo lander in the far background. (Blue Origin Illustration)

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture is working on a landing system that could put astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024 — but it’s also keeping its options open to deliver a ton of cargo to the lunar surface a year before that.

Blue Origin’s chief scientist, Steve Squyres, outlined the current state of plans for an Amazon-like cargo delivery to the moon today during a virtual symposium presented by the University of Washington’s Space Policy and Research Center.

The idea isn’t exactly new: Blue Origin floated its Blue Moon cargo lander concept with the Trump administration in early 2017, even before President Donald Trump formally took office. And a

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White House taps mainstream climate scientist Betsy Weatherhead to run key report

Weatherhead, who has decades of experience as a climate scientist in the academic and private sectors, accepts human-induced climate change is happening and is a serious physical, ecological and economic threat.

Her appointment stands in sharp contrast to two recent high-level political hires at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), David Legates and Ryan Maue, who are on the record challenging the seriousness of climate change. It also is in contrast to the climate change views of President Trump, who downplays humans’ role in causing global warming, despite the scientific consensus on the topic.

Weatherhead’s appointment was verified by one current and one former senior official at NOAA. Both spoke on the condition of anonymity, because they were not authorized to speak on the matter.

Unlike several past climate assessment directors, she has not previously held a position in the federal government but has worked extensively with scientists and

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Decades Ago, One Political Scientist Rejected Political Polling as Faulty and Futile. Maybe the World Should Have Listened.

Every era enshrines its prophets. Politics today has whiz kids like Nate Silver, Nate Cohn, Harry Enten and Dave Wasserman, who have achieved varying degrees of cultural celebrity by telling us what to expect come Election Day—even when, as happened once again this week, their vision proves cloudy (or worse). In 1948 there was no greater prophet than George Gallup, whose face graced the cover of Time magazine in May of that year. The accompanying profile called him “the Babe Ruth of the polling profession.”



a man sitting on a table


© Byron Rollins/AP Photo


Gallup’s name had by then become synonymous with a wide-ranging new effort by survey-takers and statisticians who were striving to know, with scientific precision, the very nature of American mind, including which presidents the public meant to elect. Gallup had rocketed to fame in 1936 by confidently declaring that the Literary Digest—at the time the gold standard of polls, which

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